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Andrew
06-12-2007, 03:57 PM
Hello Everyone.

I am planning on Hiking the presidential range in 2 weekends. What is it that I should bring when it comes to food and how to cook it and all of that good stuff. Any input would be greatly appreciated. Also, are the huts open for people to go in and refill on water? How about showers? Thanks.

-Andrew-

KD Talbot
06-12-2007, 08:24 PM
Are you planning on hiking the whole range? Are you planning an overnight stay? There is no camping above treeline. You could stay at Mizpah Spring, Lakes of the Clouds, or Madison Springs Hut. Pretty sure you'll need a reservation. They serve meals and give you blankets and pillows so you don't have to tote a sleeping bag along. You can get water there, no showers. You can get a shower at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or swim at Lakes of the Clouds, not sure if this is allowed, but I've seen people do it. Here's a link:

http://www.outdoors.org/lodging/huts/huts-experience.cfm

More useful info:

http://www.outdoors.org/recreation/hiking/hiking-gear.cfm

If you still plan to camp there are designated areas below treeline. You'll need a map to find them and they require permits you can get at Pinkham Notch. For cooked meals you'll need a lightweight backpacking stove. Here:

http://www.rei.com/camping/TOC/Stoves?cm_re=toc*toc*stoves&vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPING_TOC

Pots and utensils:

http://www.rei.com/camping/TOC/Stoves?cm_re=toc*toc*stoves&vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPING_TOC

And lightweight food like this:

http://www.rei.com/camping/TOC/Stoves?cm_re=toc*toc*stoves&vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPING_TOC

Or do like I do and carry sandwiches and snacks. Cans of Chef Boyardee or soup is good, but gets real heavy when your toting it around, better off with packaged soup you add water to and simmer. Bring all your trash including cans back out and put them in a trash bin.

I'm sure others will add to what I have suggested, keep checking this thread until you go. There is another similar thread started today in this forum and many other threads covering these and other subjects about climbing and camping in the Presidentials. Good luck and have fun.
KDT

Bill O
06-12-2007, 08:29 PM
You should be able to get water at the huts even if you aren't staying there. As Kevin said no showers. I'm pretty sure swimming in the Lakes of the Clouds is not allowed.

There are public showers at Pinkham.

What are your plans, camping or huts or one day traverse?

What trailheads are you going to use?

Brad
06-12-2007, 08:38 PM
You should be able to get water at the huts even if you aren't staying there. As Kevin said no showers. I'm pretty sure swimming in the Lakes of the Clouds is not allowed.
I can remember as a kid swimming from one end of a lake at Lakes of the Clouds to the other - then racing to the hut for hot coco. That water was cold! I am sure it is not allowed now. It took several years before I was up to do more than just in and out of the water.

Andrew
06-13-2007, 09:00 PM
this is all good much needed advice! Just what I was looking for. I am confused about the camping (yes this is an overnight trip). I did not know you had to camp at certain areas? The only signs I've ever seen up there is that you can't camp where the trees are under 6 feet tall. Anyway, here's a link to the tent I bought, hope it's a good choice, seemed to have the most room with the least weight and best quality for the price. gotta love LL Bean! haha.

Microlight Tent (http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?page=microlight-tent&categoryId=53422&parentCategory=500105&cat4=1096&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1&feat=1096-sub2)

KD Talbot
06-13-2007, 10:18 PM
Looks like a good tent.

There is no camping on the eastside of Mount Washington. There is no camping above treeline anywhere. There is no camping within 200' of any trail. There is no camping within 1/4 mile of any trailhead, hut, shelter, campground or body of water. If you get caught by the rangers camping anywhere else, and they do patrol, they will fine you.

The designated places you can camp on the Presidential Range are Osgood Tentsite in the Great Gulf, Hermit Lake in Tuckerman Ravine and Nauman Tentsite near Mispah Springs Hut. Lakes of the Clouds Hut has some, but don't count on getting one. There are shelters run by the Randolph Mountain Club on Mount Adams.

http://www.randolphmountainclub.org/

You need permits for all and most are first come first serve. You can get them at Pinkham Notch or at Mispah for Nauman.

KDT

Bill O
06-13-2007, 10:24 PM
If you want to camp anywhere you'll need to go west, way west. Far fewer people means far fewer rules.

As for the White Mountains the regulations do a good job at protecting the fragile environment from the millions of people that surround the mountains.

You should pick up a White Mountain Guide. That goes over all the regulations about camping. On top of that it has maps and information about almost all the trails in the WMNF. To be honest, if you plan on taking more than one trip to the White Mountains the guide is pretty much the standard reference.

KD Talbot
06-14-2007, 06:14 AM
Bill is right on. Most of the info in my last post is straight from the guide. The maps in the new guide even have distance between trail junctions marked beside each trail:

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/books/wmg/index.cfm


There is also a guide specific to Mount Washington and the Presidentials:

http://www.mountwashington.org/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=6_7_9&products_id=118

KDT

Be_Prepared
06-14-2007, 08:06 PM
You could stay at Mizpah Spring, Lakes of the Clouds, or Madison Springs Hut. Pretty sure you'll need a reservation. They serve meals and give you blankets and pillows so you don't have to tote a sleeping bag along.

Only thing I'd add is that although you don't need a sleeping bag, I always make sure that one of us in the group has one. If someone gets hurt in your group and you're above treeline, you might have someone immobile for a while. Even in summer, it can be very cold up there. The sleeping bag keeps them comfortable until they can evac.

Bill O
06-14-2007, 08:15 PM
Only thing I'd add is that although you don't need a sleeping bag, I always make sure that one of us in the group has one. If someone gets hurt in your group and you're above treeline, you might have someone immobile for a while. Even in summer, it can be very cold up there. The sleeping bag keeps them comfortable until they can evac.

I guess it depends on the group I'm with. Guiding paying clients I don't know, I'd carry an emergency bag. A group of friends and family, all hikers, I wouldn't. a group of kids, I'd bring one.

Just my opinion. I guess you have to weigh risk/reward for each situation.

I have a lot of failures on big peaks that are well correlated to me carrying a sleeping bag on summit day. Not that one causes the other, but it could be a part of the problem.

Be_Prepared
06-14-2007, 08:24 PM
Yeah, I tend to be the designated responsible adult with a bunch of youth, so my brain heads toward having a "plan B" when they get hurt. We're trying to teach them to be more personally responsible, but, with guard rails until they actually are! :) You're right that with a bunch of experienced adults, you could probably do without a sleeping bag, but, I still have something like a thermolite bivy in my daypack. (I tend to be "overprepared" I guess. Drilled into me since birth I think)

KD Talbot
06-14-2007, 08:57 PM
A sleeping bag is what they preach and it's a good idea but I carry a plastic thermal blanket. It costs only a few bucks and folds up to the size of a pack of cigarettes and weighs less. It's made for back country emergencies. Keep two of these in your pack, one for under and one for over. I've never had to deal with this situation, but I'd hate to try to put someone with a leg or ankle fracture in a sleeping bag, though it would be good to wrap them in, especially someone hypothermic. I'd rely on these thermal blankets and all the extra clothes that are in my pack and theirs. I hope none of us ever have to deal with it.
KDT

Andrew
06-15-2007, 02:40 PM
Well I have the 27th edition of the white mountain guide. I'll read up on it and before the hike I'll ask at Pinkham Notch where to camp, and for the permits and stuff. Thanks for the help guys :)

Andrew
06-15-2007, 03:01 PM
the guide says if you do use non established areas for camping, to make sure you're at least 200 feet from the trail side and not near surface water, and of course, not above tree line(8 ft or above tree height). To also avoid clearing vegetation, etc. They say that's for the WMNF only. Anywhere else you must be in designated areas.