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Dorothy
07-17-2007, 12:34 PM
If you go up Tuckermans, after the junction there is a small, short rise and you are at HoJos. No ice cream stand, but there is a nice porch to hang out and look at the ravine and all its glory. Here you are looking up. On Lions Head very quickly you are looking down and out across the range. After HoJos the trail is quick easy, flat in places, short up but not too steep. This gets you to the floor of the ravine. This is where I like to get in the winter to take pictures as the sun does not get to the floor at that time of year. Continue ahead and to the north then up a small broken stone traiil that traces the far right face of the headwall. The trail drops right off on your left as you are going up. I was passing someone one day and she slipped as I went by on the outside. I had to fall into her to stop us both from going over the edge. Most people go this trail as it is a lot easier climb.


What do you mean you had to fall into her to stop her from falling??? Is the trail a dangerous one?? Is it on the edge of the mountain?? If it is is there a trail that is not on the edge?? It sounds dangerous.

Brad
07-17-2007, 03:21 PM
If you go up Tuckermans, after the junction there is a small, short rise and you are at HoJos. No ice cream stand, but there is a nice porch to hang out and look at the ravine and all its glory. Here you are looking up. On Lions Head very quickly you are looking down and out across the range. After HoJos the trail is quick easy, flat in places, short up but not too steep. This gets you to the floor of the ravine. This is where I like to get in the winter to take pictures as the sun does not get to the floor at that time of year. Continue ahead and to the north then up a small broken stone traiil that traces the far right face of the headwall. The trail drops right off on your left as you are going up. I was passing someone one day and she slipped as I went by on the outside. I had to fall into her to stop us both from going over the edge. Most people go this trail as it is a lot easier climb.


What do you mean you had to fall into her to stop her from falling??? Is the trail a dangerous one?? Is it on the edge of the mountain?? If it is is there a trail that is not on the edge?? It sounds dangerous.
It is dangerous. All the trails have their hazards. Some are just rocks. Others have very slippery places. You do have to be careful every step of the way.

The trail going up Tucks Headwall is very narrow. Two with packs on can not pass without someone moving out of the way. The place where we had the problem the trail was about 2 feet wide and the "downhill" side drops straight down. For some reason she lost her balance just as we were passing and the only way of protecting us both was to "fall into the hill"and her. Hiking to the summit of Mt Washington should not be taken lightly. I have taken family members who jog every day and are generally in very good shape. Part way up Lions Head they were wiped out and realized the hike was harder than anything they had ever done before. They still talk about that hike many years ago.

KD Talbot
07-17-2007, 08:46 PM
For someone with little climbing experience this trail and all trails on MW may seem a little scary. As Brad says, yes, it's dangerous. Indeed, all trails in the White Mountains have their hazards. You could also walk to the bathroom at night and turn your ankle. A spill on any trail in the Whites could be bad. It's not like you'd fall over a precipice into a void and they'd never find your bones, (although this might be true on Huntington Ravine or the Great Gulf, ha!). Use your own judgement out there, if it's too hairy for your liking, turn around. The trail is relatively easy to the floor of the ravine. This could always be a destination. Nothing says one has to summit at Seek the Peak. There are knowledgeable people at the signup desk who can suggest hikes for all abilities. All trails to the summit are a difficult undertaking at best. However, there are many fine destinations on MW that don't require putting oneself in any danger. The floor of Tuckerman Ravine is one. For that matter, the floor of Huntington Ravine is also a good destination which doesn't require as much stamina or fortitude as climbing up out of the ravines. Climbing up out of Tuckerman Ravine is narrow and drops off on one side, but it's not like you're inching along a building overhang clawing at smooth walls to keep your balance. My guess is none but the very inexperienced or people with vertigo or agrophobia would have any problem here. The real test is when you climb up out of the ravine and there is still a half mile of very steep rock hopping to get to the summit. Thousands of people manage it every year, many with little or no experience. Just know you limitations, come prepared, and do not push yourself beyond your comfort level. If the Tuckerman Ravine Trail sounds like it may be too much for you, but you are determined to make a summit attempt, then there is also Lion's Head Trail, which has fewer spots where you might feel uncomfortable, and is about the same distance. There is also Boott Spur Trail, where I can't think of any narrow spaces with drop offs, though it adds considerable distance to the hike. What you may want to do is pick up a copy of the AMC's White Mountain Guide and read up on the trail descriptions.

http://www.mountwashington.org/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=6_7_9&products_id=28

Or:

http://www.mountwashington.org/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=6_7_9&products_id=118



Don't worry, you'll be fine! If you have more questions feel free to ask, we'll help anyway we can. See you on the mountain!

KDT

Dorothy
07-18-2007, 02:03 PM
So will someone please suggest a couple of trails that are not as dangerous?? Are there trails that have NO ledges and are just paths up the mt?? This is why this is a hard thing to try and support there really are not many threads on people who are going the first time!! Who would want to climb the first time on ledges?? There has to be a trail that is a path that is not dangerous!! Thx.

Bill O
07-18-2007, 03:11 PM
So will someone please suggest a couple of trails that are not as dangerous?? Are there trails that have NO ledges and are just paths up the mt?? This is why this is a hard thing to try and support there really are not many threads on people who are going the first time!! Who would want to climb the first time on ledges?? There has to be a trail that is a path that is not dangerous!! Thx.

My personal opinion is that no trails on Mount Washington are dangerous.

KD Talbot
07-18-2007, 05:15 PM
Whether the trails on MW are dangerous or not is certainly subject to debate. I'd have to say that that Huntington Ravine, especially in the rain, could be dangerous, especially to the inexperienced. I've been up Tuckerman in the pouring rain, (my 1st STP) and what was dangerous was the map lichen that grows on all the rocks becomes slick as ice. I took some nasty tumbles. The danger was the weather and it's effects, not so much the trail.

There are no nice paths through the woods to the summit. All trails eventually rise above treeline and from there on you are hopping, climbing and clamoring over rocks, sometimes hand over hand, to get to the summit.

When you say ledges I think you picture in your mind a narrow footpath with a shear drop-off on one side and smooth walls on the other. This is not at all the case on any of the trails you're apt to take out of Pinkham Notch. There is a narrow section on Tuckerman Ravine Trail, as Brad says, but if you have any experience I don't think it's going to be that difficult for you.

Give us some background. Do you have any climbing experience at all? If you do, then I don't think Tuckerman Ravine is going to be that big of a deal to you.

What is your goal? The summit? Then Tuckerman is probably your best bet. It is the most direct, easiest to follow, and if you do have a mishap, there will no doubt be dozens of people nearby to help you out.

As I said in my previous post, unless you suffer from vertigo, agrophobia or you're just afraid to climb over rocks, then you'll be fine.

If this all sounds too much for you, then think about doing this:

Climb Boott Spur Trail. I cannot think of anywhere where you would be exposed to a ledge with a shear drop. On the way up there is an outlook over Tuckerman Ravine at Harvard Rock. If you feel good from there, continue the climb to Boott Spur. There is a fine view of the surrounding mountains, the summit dome of MW, and below you is Tuckerman Ravine. From the Tuckerman Ravine Trail it is 1.7 miles to Harvard Rock and 1750' elevation. It is 2.9 miles to the summit of Boott Spur, where you could turn around and descend if too tired, or you could continue on to the summit of MW along the Davis and Crawford Paths. This would be 5.4 miles and 4300' elevation. This would be about the same elevation as Tuckerman, though it would add 1.2 miles to the trip, one way. The hike from Boott Sput to the Crawford Path is relatively easy and takes up most of that extra 1.2 miles, then the climb to the summit would begin. This avoids the ravines, and I cannot think of anywhere you would face any shear drops, though you would be above treeline and exposed to any weather there may be for a much longer time than on Tuckerman.

If you still do not feel comfortable with this idea, say so and I can suggest some other hikes.

KDT

Steve M
07-18-2007, 05:40 PM
Dorothy, I think the question would be how much trail experience do you have and how physically fit are you? Hypothetically, if you have never set foot on a trail besides a walking path, are very overweight and no exercise, and smoke 3 packs of cigarettes a day, then I would suggest you not hike to the summit at all. It is roughly a 4000' elevation gain over a 4-5 mile hike. If, however, you have some trail experience, are in fairly decent shape, and exercise regularly, then you should be fine on most trails. You may be slower than those who have more experience and are in great physical shape but you should be able to handle it. Many people hike to the summit each year who aren't experts and do just fine. The Ammonoosuc Ravine Trail would also be a good choice. There is one steep section that is still below tree line that if you should slip you would not fall off the mountain:) . Once you reach tree line you are a short way to the Lake of the Clouds Hut and you could take a rest and make the decision of whether or not you wanted to continue to the summit. Many people use that trail as well so you will not be alone. That trail starts off Base Rd. on the Western side of the mountain by the Cog Station.

Dorothy
07-19-2007, 11:36 AM
I want the safest trail up and down. I don't want to be on ledges where I have to be really careful of every step!!! All the threads say that Tuckermen's is a good one to start on and then there's a thread about a person almost falling off the ledge!!!

Brad
07-19-2007, 01:15 PM
I want the safest trail up and down. I don't want to be on ledges where I have to be really careful of every step!!! All the threads say that Tuckermen's is a good one to start on and then there's a thread about a person almost falling off the ledge!!!
Others will add their comments, I am sure. Hiking anywhere on Mt Washington has its risks. It is a balance of hikers' conditioning, trail and weather forecast that help me determine which trail(s) to use. Lions Head up and Tuckermans Headwall down is a popular combination. Once above tree line you do not have good visibility on what weather is coming in from the west - and you are exposed. For a good weather day this is a good combination.

An easier (in my opinion) combination is Ammo-Jewell. If there are late in the day storms predicted this would not be a good combination as you are exposed. You can see to the west to watch what is coming in though.

mary
07-20-2007, 06:24 AM
i think its pretty much like everything else in life....if you get to a place where you are afraid or wondering about your safety/ability....turn back....no one can really make that call for you....ive personally been up to the top of mt washington before.....and while i certainly can not offer you anything substantial about the trails i can suggest the following....this is a great fundraiser....so make the goals small to start with....raise some money for the mountain....and make it a goal to do the best you can for the hike....its stated several places that you dont have to reach the summit....im going with my son and his girlfriend....while they have hiked locally....(bear mountain and a few others)....this will really be a challenge not only for them but for me too....so make the decision to have a great day and accomplish what you can.....listen to your gut....its usually right on the money....i hope this is taken in the spirit in which it is intended....good luck....

mary
07-20-2007, 06:25 AM
i wonder....are you hiking alone?....

Rich
07-20-2007, 07:26 AM
On July 28th, I highly doubt anyone will be hiking alone on Mt. Washington...especially out of Pinkham. There could be rush hour traffic at points.

For all who are concerned remember...there's strength in numbers.

Dorothy
07-23-2007, 12:53 PM
I am hiking alone but the seekthepeak homepage claims that there will be people and helpers all over the place. If I go up The Tuckerman way and then the Lion Head Trail, will I miss walking on or near ledges?? I don't want to walk on or near any ledge. THX

Brad
07-23-2007, 01:36 PM
I have created a new folder on our Fotki MWO site for trail information. I added 2 topo maps - one of the Pinkham - Tuckermans - summit route and the other being the Pinkham - Lions Head - summit.

They are both the same distance - 3.4 miles. Obviously, the same elevation gain about 4,300 feet. However, the profiles are a bit different. With the Lions Head route at about 2.5 miles there is an increase in slope as you leave the Tuckerman Trail and get above tree line. This is where you have the ladder.

The Tuckermans Headwall route is more gradual all the way.

Link to new album
http://public.fotki.com/MWO/trails/trail-information

Tuckermans Headwall route
http://images26.fotki.com/v940/photos/1/1002902/5197655/TrailTuckerman-vi.jpg

Lions Head route
http://images25.fotki.com/v955/photos/1/1002902/5197655/TrailLionsHead-vi.jpg

KD Talbot
07-23-2007, 09:57 PM
On either route you will be scrambling over boulders. There are ladders over some nasty sections on Lion's Head. By ladders, we mean something more akin to stairs, with no railing. As for ledges, in Tuckerman there are a few spots where there is drop off on one side. I think you are picturing in your mind a cliff with a narrow crawlspace along a ledge. As I've stated before, it's not really like this. If you can scramble over boulders and can get past a few short spots where an inexperienced, afraid of heights person might not want to look down for a few steps, then you will be fine. If you are uncomfortable, turn around and call it a day.

Without trying to sound like a jerk, we have tried to answer all of your questions, you haven't answered any of ours as to your experience, ability, etc.

You asked for alternate routes, what we would suggest. We have suggested alternate routes, i.e. the Boott Spur Trail and the Jewell Trail.

Every route to the summit has it's own degree of difficulty. I've climbed just about all of them and I would not pick one over the other. If you are looking for assurances here that you are going to have a nice safe trip to the summit of the highest peak in the northeast, nobody here is going to give you that. This trip involves climbing a mountain often referred to as the "Rockpile" and is billed as the "Worst Weather in the World". Only you can decide where your comfort level begins and ends.

We all want to help you out in every way we can. Mary's post is about as nice as it can be put:

"i think its pretty much like everything else in life....if you get to a place where you are afraid or wondering about your safety/ability....turn back....no one can really make that call for you.."

and:

"and make it a goal to do the best you can for the hike....its stated several places that you dont have to reach the summit....im going with my son and his girlfriend....while they have hiked locally....(bear mountain and a few others)....this will really be a challenge not only for them but for me too....so make the decision to have a great day and accomplish what you can.....listen to your gut....its usually right on the money..."

We are all pulling for you here, but no one is going to assure you that you will not find someplace you are not comfortable on ANY trail. The Jewell Trail is moderate, has no rock scrambles and pretty good footing, but then you must get on the Gulfside Trail and walk right next to the edge of the Great Gulf. Tuckerman Ravine and Lion's Head have rock scrambles and places where a person uncomfortable with heights may be afraid. My personal suggestion would be Boott Spur Trail, as most of these hazards are avoided. That's all I can tell you, the rest is up to you. Good Luck!
KDT

PS: to Brad: Tuckerman Ravine is 4.2 miles, Lion's Head 4.1.

FisherCat
07-23-2007, 11:32 PM
Ditto on the suggestion for Boott Spur. One aspect to also consider is if Tuckerman's is receiving high traffic(which we're sure it will for this occasion)you may also have to factor in people above you dislodging(inadvertently)loose stone. If one is already trepid this is just another factor to consider. Normally, not a problem, but as stated with increased traffic it could be. It has never directly happened to myself, but I have encountered those who say it has happened to them when the trail was busy.
There are many factors to consider about the Rockpile, the mountain itself, the weather, etc., and the personal factors :ability, health, experience, and judgement. You are in control of the personal factors including the ability to continue or call it quits till another day. We can all agree that over the years we have seen people try to climb Mt W, pass by them and swear they would never make it, then lo and behold, later on at the top they are there. Then there are those you think will have no problem and they just can't do it.
Boott Spur keeps you away from the feeling of severe dropoff. All-in-all it helps your perspective. Some people have no problem climbing headwalls until when they pause for a break, turn and look out behind them, they freeze because perspective -wise they feel they are going to fall all the way down to the parking lot.
Whichever way you go and however far you get, just have a good time in what you can accomplish, that's about as much of a guarantee that the White Mountains will give you !

Brad
07-24-2007, 05:53 AM
I have never done Boott Spur - up or down. With all the times I have been on that range it is a bit odd. I should find a day to go that route. Maybe I should retire and do a hike a week.

Kevin, you are right on the real distances for the 2 trails (4.2 and 4.1 miles). When I switch the Topo software to show "terrain distance" the Lions Head route is 3.8 miles and 3.6 miles for Tuckermans. It is still off a bit.

When talking with folks at the office about "hiking" on Mt Washington I find the terminology is not always clear. Some think of the hike they took in NC around a park along the coast - perfectly flat terrain. That is "walking" to me.

Others think of rock cliffs and ropes. This is "climbing" to me.

As a kid we used to try to get to the top of Mt Washington on whatever trail we were using and not touch your hands to anything the whole way. On many of the trails this can be done with good balance and conditioning. Tucks, Ammo, Jewell and Lions Head are some that can be done. You are going up irregular sized steps for 3-4 hours. That is the killer. At the top there is about 25% less oxygen. You will get tired and then your balance is not as good. Part of the issue on these trails is they are accessible and therefore people are out there who should not be. They go beyond their abilities and conditioning. I have seen some who went up in a car and decided to walk down and have the car meet them at Pinkham. They were struggling. I have taken a High School top notch in shape kid to the summit. He would not admit how much he was struggling even though we were checking. He rode the Cog down.

Mt Washington trails are rugged - tough on the body - the weather can turn nasty in a minute - and no matter what conditioning I do beforehand I know I have worked hard at the end of the day. Going to the summit is not for folks looking for a walk. The Seek The Peak release form tells it all - we assume all risks.

But, it is beautiful up there . . .

Another suggestion would be to check out the photos taken by folks of the different trails. I know Kevin and Lloyd have many to look at. Mine for Mt Washington have been grouped at http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet/hikes/mt-washington/

Dorothy
07-24-2007, 07:09 AM
All I wanted to know is if there was ledges on Lions Head, I said I never hiked before BUT the seekthepeek page claims it is for all people like there would be lots of help!! I'm not going, forget it. I don't want to be part of something where the people don't really help much. I can't even read the maps left why did you think I could know how to read that map?? You aren't very nice or helpful to new people.

Bill O
07-24-2007, 07:26 AM
Too bad, everyone here was trying to help.

And yes, there are ledges on Lion's Head Trail. Some of which you could easily fall off.

The problem is that everyone on this forum has a hard time dealing with irrational fear. For instance, falling off the side of a mountain. Most of us understand the difference between possibility and probability. When climbing Mount Washington one of the last things you should worry about is falling off the side of the mountain. Statistically you should be much more worried about heart attack, lightning, hypothermia, frost bite, falling into crevasses, cog disasters, and piercing yourself with an ice axe. The only thing I'm worried about is the drive up. That's one of the most dangerous things in the world to do.

I'm not sure that STP is for all people. Nothing ever is. But I'm satisfied that all people who want to climb MWN and do STP have signed up. Or they will by 5pm tomorrow.

Rich
07-24-2007, 08:11 AM
All I wanted to know is if there was ledges on Lions Head, I said I never hiked before BUT the seekthepeek page claims it is for all people like there would be lots of help!! I'm not going, forget it. I don't want to be part of something where the people don't really help much. I can't even read the maps left why did you think I could know how to read that map?? You aren't very nice or helpful to new people.

Hey Dorothy...how are ya?

I'm pretty sure they meant seek the peak is for all people that enjoy hiking and have some experience at hiking (enjoyment of weather too, this is a fund raiser for the obs facility, correct?).

I don't think Mt. Washington is often suggested for someones first hike in the whites. Your attitude is yucky. Everyone here replied to your posts and not one of them was useless. Like I said before, there are plenty of hikers out there who would help you and most likely you'd hook up with people who go at your pace.

Not really fair to say everyone here didn't help you out thus far! You should apologize to Brad for your comment on his post with the maps. He took his time to put that together...pretty generous I think and all you did was SLAM him!

FisherCat
07-24-2007, 12:23 PM
I don't think anyone here or their suggestions were meant to offend. Whether or not someone decides to do Seek the Peak is up to them. It is a chance to enjoy hiking and for a good cause. Hopefully, if you do it or not,you will still enjoy the opportunity to hike NH, especially the White Mountains, and will have a good time wherever it is you go. I don't think anyone will dissuade or disagree with that.
Please enjoy!

Brad
07-24-2007, 08:56 PM
All I wanted to know is if there was ledges on Lions Head, I said I never hiked before BUT the seekthepeek page claims it is for all people like there would be lots of help!! I'm not going, forget it. I don't want to be part of something where the people don't really help much. I can't even read the maps left why did you think I could know how to read that map?? You aren't very nice or helpful to new people.
Well, there are ledges on Lions Head. But, the real question is do you have to get near them and the answer would be "no". Here is a view of the major area of "ledges".

http://images23.fotki.com/v871/photos/8/8235/4997969/P0003422-vi.jpg

Here is the ladder going up Lions Head
http://images24.fotki.com/v872/photos/8/8235/4997969/P0003415-vi.jpg

As you can see those are not a big deal.

The Jewell Trail on the western side has one section by the Great Gulf. The ledge drops off quite dramatically. I am not comfortable being too close there as the footing is loose rock. But, the trail is wide enough there to allow you to stay 10-15 feet away from the edge.

http://images23.fotki.com/v866/photos/8/8235/4998508/IMG_6225a-vi.jpg

At this point in the next picture going down Tuckermans Headwall the trail is not very wide and it drops off. There is no room to stay away from the edge on the narrow trail.

http://images23.fotki.com/v859/photos/8/8235/4998010/IMG_3542-vi.jpg

Learning to read a street atlas is one of those things you do when one starts to drive. When hiking one learns to read a topo map. It tells the distance - puts the directions in perspective to help you know where you are on a trail - gives information about water crossings or drinking water sources - and gives a clear idea of the steepness of the trail. Yes, they are confusing - but, just because they are different.

Having a topo map with you when hiking is key - just like having enough water. Pick one up at your local REI store and read the legends. Try to figure it out. If there is something you do not understand, ask questions. The folks here are willing to help.

Charlie
07-24-2007, 09:00 PM
when i was up there a week ago we were at lions head looking down on the tucks and here comes an older man and his wife coming up lion head and he is wearing sandals with socks ,and had a plastic bag that you get at a super market with some food in it .he made it to the top .
so with that said i say if you have some good supply's with you and the weather is not to bad you can do it.
there are a lot of boulders to go over and sandals are not recommended :eek: :eek:

Brad
07-24-2007, 09:07 PM
LOL - I did have to laugh at Hawk's post. I have seen folks in sandals - and even heeled shoes. I saw one girl a couple of years ago barefoot because her shoes were hurting her. My son ran up Tuckermans one day in Tava's. But, I have also helped carry people out of there because they did not have good footwear. Going down seems to be harder on folks because they do not have a good soft down technique. Show them a better approach and they double their speed.

Still when they get to the bottom their knees and hips are shot for a few days. Instead of crashing to a stop with each step down - float from step to step so your upper body is "going down an escalator" and your feet are hopping from rock to rock. It works so much better.

Charlie
07-24-2007, 09:21 PM
do you use walking poles .
some of the people i was with had them and they look like they can help on the rocks ,like having two more legs.

KD Talbot
07-24-2007, 10:26 PM
I started out without poles, pounded my knees. My legs took a beating. There had to be a better way. There is. I use one pole. It not only takes the stress off of going down, you can use it to push going up. Absolutely helps with balance, especially if you're uncomfortable at water crossings like my wife.
After about 2 trips you get used to carrying it. They telescope, so you can always throw it in your pack and just use it when you want to.

I don't leave home without it.

KDT

Brad
07-25-2007, 06:21 AM
Hiking in NC I have started using them (2 actually) - but, have never used them in NH/Maine. The rougher trails and scrambling is very different. I might try taking one this weekend. The ones I use have built in shocks and screw off tops. When the top is unscrewed it becomes a monopod for a camera to hold it steadier.

I got them from REI
http://www.rei.com/product/745686

8 oz in weight is excellent.

BlueDog
07-25-2007, 04:24 PM
Learning to read a street atlas is one of those things you do when one starts to drive. When hiking one learns to read a topo map. It tells the distance - puts the directions in perspective to help you know where you are on a trail - gives information about water crossings or drinking water sources - and gives a clear idea of the steepness of the trail. Yes, they are confusing - but, just because they are different.

Having a topo map with you when hiking is key - just like having enough water. Pick one up at your local REI store and read the legends. Try to figure it out. If there is something you do not understand, ask questions. The folks here are willing to help.

I ordered a map from MyTopo.com for this trip. Reading a Topo is a VERY good skill to have, along with a compass. Here's a link to the preview image that the site gives you before you place the order. If anyone wants to check it out on Friday I'll be at Moose Brook (see the "Where we staying?" thread) and more than happy to share it with everyone. I'm hoping to find a clearer trail map when I get there.

MyTopo map of Mount Washington 1:25000 scale with UTM grid (http://www.follylane.org/getout/mount-washington.jpg)

Brad
07-25-2007, 07:46 PM
What I like about Delorme's TopoUSA software is I can zoom and move around to get the topo map I want. It has most trails and you can do a route - by car - or by trail. Plus, it can work with a GPS like I have in the car.

BlueDog
07-26-2007, 10:30 AM
One of these days I'll actually break down and get a GPS. Handheld so I can take it on the trail. I got the topo because we have to use these same ones on the Adventure Races I do, so I'm forcing myself to become more and more familiar with them and orienteering the old fashioned way.

Steve M
07-27-2007, 07:41 AM
LOL - I did have to laugh at Hawk's post. I have seen folks in sandals - and even heeled shoes. I saw one girl a couple of years ago barefoot because her shoes were hurting her. My son ran up Tuckermans one day in Tava's. But, I have also helped carry people out of there because they did not have good footwear. Going down seems to be harder on folks because they do not have a good soft down technique. Show them a better approach and they double their speed.

Still when they get to the bottom their knees and hips are shot for a few days. Instead of crashing to a stop with each step down - float from step to step so your upper body is "going down an escalator" and your feet are hopping from rock to rock. It works so much better.
I saw two people on Crawford path 50 yards from the summit yesterday who had come up the Ammo trail wearing crocks!!! I couldn't believe it...no packs, no water that I could see...just shorts, t-shirts and crocks. I don't recommend this for anyone!!

Brad
07-27-2007, 01:14 PM
I saw two people on Crawford path 50 yards from the summit yesterday who had come up the Ammo trail wearing crocks!!! I couldn't believe it...no packs, no water that I could see...just shorts, t-shirts and crocks. I don't recommend this for anyone!!
What is amazing is they normally survive.

Charlie
07-27-2007, 02:05 PM
very very Lucky

and they say to each other on the trail ,why do they need to have those big packs

Brad
07-27-2007, 04:34 PM
very very Lucky

and they say to each other on the trail ,why do they need to have those big packs
Beginning of August one year I was caught in a snow storm above treeline.

Another August the clouds came in and our breath blew back on our faces and froze.

And then, of course, there was the time . . .

Charlie
07-27-2007, 06:38 PM
i always say be prepared for the worst ,you never know

Bill O
07-29-2007, 04:15 PM
Upon further analysis, I don't think the Tuckerman Ravine Trail has any ledges you could fall off.

The first steep section is the climb next to the Lunch Rocks. This is nothing more than a steep staircase. Older houses probably have steeper stairs, but not as good a view. At the top of this section you make a hard left and ascend a well-protected ramp. You'd have to purposely make three steps in the wrong direction to have any chance of falling "off the mountain." Even then you'd probably get caught up in the bushes and scrub trees. From there the top of the ravine gradually gets less steep.

Brad
07-29-2007, 04:27 PM
I think this is the section you are referring to as a "well protected ramp". I took this picture from the top of Lions Head.

http://images20.fotki.com/v961/photos/1/1002902/5218194/IMG_4938-vi.jpg

Bill O
07-29-2007, 04:56 PM
That's funny. If I had to pick the most dangerous section, its right in that photo. And those hikers are not helping. They're climbing that rust colored rock section to the right while the main trail obviously goes to the left. To the left there are some nice stone steps, to the right its slick mud and rock.

KD Talbot
07-29-2007, 10:51 PM
Adding to the erosion and general degredation to the ravine! Read the signs, they ask you very nicely to stay on the trail or rocky surfaces.

KDT