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novascroller
09-23-2007, 07:17 AM
earlier this month, the wife and I took our first White Mts hike, Mt Willard. Being considerably out of shape, this easy (according to AMC guide) hike almost killed us. we were sore for the next couple of days. our goal next year is something a little more challenging. we want to get in better shape for next year. any suggestions on what piece of exercise equipment for best train us? stairclimber, exercise bike, etc?? thanks in advance.

graham

Rich
09-23-2007, 09:43 AM
Welcome Graham!

Where do you live? Near the mountains? If so then hiking is your best training. If not then get a good stairmaster or if you have stairs in your home use them...they're a lot cheaper!

novascroller
09-23-2007, 01:11 PM
Welcome Graham!

Where do you live? Near the mountains? If so then hiking is your best training. If not then get a good stairmaster or if you have stairs in your home use them...they're a lot cheaper!

i'm in nova scotia, not overly hilly.

Brad
09-23-2007, 06:55 PM
I use the basement to first floor stairs in the house. Up and down = 1 trip. Start with 10 trips and work up. I focus on doing them flat out with no rest and try to add each day. I will do more of this in the spring as i found it did help.

I have found a training hike in NC about 2 hours from here (Pilot Mt) that I did twice this summer with heavy stuff in the pack to focus on the irregular stone steps going up.

Steve M
09-23-2007, 09:23 PM
Welcome to the forums Nova.

I use the bleachers at the local high school. The nice thing about bleachers is you can climb from seat to seat (easier) to start off, then when you need more of a challenge you can do floor to seat. If you live close to a University try there stadium. I guarantee those will get you ready.;)

novascroller
09-24-2007, 07:48 PM
Welcome to the forums Nova.

I use the bleachers at the local high school. The nice thing about bleachers is you can climb from seat to seat (easier) to start off, then when you need more of a challenge you can do floor to seat. If you live close to a University try there stadium. I guarantee those will get you ready.;)

thanks for the info. i like the cheaper options more than the stairmaster. i've started taking the stairs up to where i work. 4 floors and i'm usually sucking air by the time i get to the top! :D i'm going to look around locally for a pile of steps or a steep hill. i want to be able to feel like Mt Willard is a piece of cake next year and try something tougher.

JimS
09-24-2007, 08:24 PM
I am going to give you an intersting option, but it keeps my legs in really good shape for a simple piece of equipment.

It's called an INDO board, or comparable balance trainer.

http://www.indoboard.com/index.php

When you stand on this thing, you have to stabilize your whole body with the little used muscles in your legs. As you build up your balance, you can attempt to do squats on it, which'll feel like starting over.

For under $100, I don't think that there is anything better.

One word of warning. Brace yourself against a wall and clear the room the first time you try it though!!!

Steve M
09-24-2007, 08:41 PM
Jim,

I checked out the site for the Indo boards. Which style do you use or recommend for hiking since there are many styles?

Bill O
09-24-2007, 08:41 PM
thanks for the info. i like the cheaper options more than the stairmaster. i've started taking the stairs up to where i work. 4 floors and i'm usually sucking air by the time i get to the top! :D

Don't worry about sucking wind after four flights of stairs. It's not a good indicator of your physical ability. I get winded from walking up a few flights and I can climb Mount Washington in less than 2.5 hours. Your body needs some time to get your heart rate up.

Steve M
09-24-2007, 08:52 PM
Don't worry about sucking wind after four flights of stairs. It's not a good indicator of your physical ability. I get winded from walking up a few flights and I can climb Mount Washington in less than 2.5 hours. Your body needs some time to get your heart rate up.
That is very true. It seems the body always fights physical exercise. At the beginning with the lack of oxygen comes winded-ness and fatigued muscles, but after a short period of time the blood gets the oxygen to your body and your body will catch up and be fine.
Years ago I was a distance runner and I would experience two of those times. Once when I would start running, and the second was "hitting the wall" so top speak. As I would press on past the wall it was like getting my second wind and I could run quite a bit farther.

Brad
09-24-2007, 08:55 PM
I had a week to "get in shape for STP" this past summer. I did the stairs in the house routine and worked up to 40 round trips - flat out with no rest. I was surprised at how quickly one improves.

Did it help? Yes - definitely. Was it enough to make STP easy or easier? Nope - no way. It was still a struggle for me. A week is not enough :-)

novascroller
09-25-2007, 12:45 PM
for now i'm just going to keep going up and down these four floors of steps at work on breaks and lunchtime. that would be a good start, next will be losing about 40 lbs worth of unnecessary weight i'm carrying.