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View Full Version : Sodium Acetate Heat Packs?



spyboy
11-25-2007, 04:40 PM
Have anyone tried sodium acetate heat packs? They are clear until you click a metal thingie (yeah, that's technical) inside the bag and then it reacts, crystallizing the sodium acetate and giving off heat (130 degrees F).

I was curious how long the heat lasts before recharging (boiling the bag in water until it turns clear again).

Are they worth getting? I was thinking this could be a nice addition to my emergency kit.

Kirk

Knapper
11-25-2007, 11:36 PM
Bought these because they were on sale and a buddy of mine had the same brand. You can usually find good deals online though on them as well. I bought them because they are reusable which would save me in the long run. But I have mixed feelings on them. If you follow the instructions to a point, then they work great. Meaning if you snap the plate to activate them in an indoor setting then stick them in a well insulated area, they stay warm for an hour or so. But the thing is, you have to keep kneeding them to keep the cyrstals active. If not, it seems to cool in like 10 minutes. If you have some large gloves where these can slip into the palms of your hands between the inner and outer layers and squeeze them that way, I have got them to work for three hours for the snow cat ride up in -10F at the top with cooling along the way. Also, if you store them somewhere where they are not insulated, I have had them crystalize without being activated due to temperature (ie, the trunk of my car). Bottom line, if you want instant long term heat that is reliable, use the charcoal type. If you want short term, instant and reusable heat, try the sodium type. But I guess what would be key here is to find someone that has em so you can try them before you buy them. But even after you try them, the outdoors classes I have taken advises that you keep the charcoal type in your emergency kit not these and to make sure you renew the charcoal type every two years to ensure they will work.

spyboy
11-26-2007, 12:27 AM
Thank you for the info. I knew (as always) I'd get an informative answer on these forums :)

Kirk

Mike D
11-26-2007, 12:58 PM
Knapper clearly has more practical experience with these heat packs than I do. When I was a kid, I was fascinated by the heat crystals that spread out from the metal clicker. The one-off heat packs are not nearly as interesting. ;)

Brad
11-26-2007, 01:49 PM
I have 3 of the "really cool" ones. So, I will have to experiment this winter with them a bit. I got them at a log home show to use when waterskiing in the winter.

Mike D
11-26-2007, 07:50 PM
I have 3 of the "really cool" ones. So, I will have to experiment this winter with them a bit. I got them at a log home show to use when waterskiing in the winter.

This is called "cross country skiing".

Brad
11-26-2007, 08:50 PM
This is called "cross country skiing".
... on the lake. If you are pulled by a snowmobile over the frozen lake, does it count as waterskiing?

Steve M
11-26-2007, 09:12 PM
... on the lake. If you are pulled by a snowmobile over the frozen lake, does it count as waterskiing?
Technically speaking that would be iceskiing.:rolleyes:

spyboy
11-26-2007, 09:25 PM
or skijoring if you have the family dog with you

Mike D
11-28-2007, 09:12 AM
I suggest you patent this concept right away and get some ice skis on the market.

spyboy
11-28-2007, 09:39 AM
Wouldn't iceskiing just be extremely long ice skates?

Brad
11-28-2007, 12:30 PM
I suggest you patent this concept right away and get some ice skis on the market.
How about ice kite boarding as a concept?

Brad
11-28-2007, 12:39 PM
Wouldn't iceskiing just be extremely long ice skates?
If you are on an 11 mile long lake that is frozen and has 2 feet of snow on it - no.

Steve M
11-29-2007, 07:53 AM
For excitement you could put ski jumps on the ice just like in waterskiing. Only problem is there is no wake to jump.

Patrad Fischroy
11-29-2007, 08:28 AM
Put as plow on the snowmobile and you will have some wakes to jump

Mike D
11-29-2007, 11:57 AM
For excitement you could put ski jumps on the ice just like in waterskiing. Only problem is there is no wake to jump.

Depends on how choppy it is when the lake freezes over. ;)

Mike D
11-29-2007, 11:57 AM
When did this thread get hijacked?

Brad
11-29-2007, 12:51 PM
When did this thread get hijacked?
Wow, I did not notice it was hijacked.

Steve M
11-29-2007, 08:30 PM
I kinda like it, the original context was starting to get boring.:D


Depends on how choppy it is when the lake freezes over.

Think of how cold it would have to get for that to happen!:cool:

Brad
11-29-2007, 09:39 PM
I kinda like it, the original context was starting to get boring.:D

Think of how cold it would have to get for that to happen!:cool:
many years the lake freezes - then the water level goes down further. The ice cracks, shifts, and a huge ridge picks up. If you were to hit it from one side on a snowmobile you would get launched. Come at it from the other side and it would really hurt. What is amazing is to see river freeze.

Steve M
11-29-2007, 09:45 PM
many years the lake freezes - then the water level goes down further. The ice cracks, shifts, and a huge ridge picks up. If you were to hit it from one side on a snowmobile you would get launched. Come at it from the other side and it would really hurt. What is amazing is to see river freeze.
That's very interesting. Do people get into ice sailing on the lake?

Brad
11-29-2007, 09:53 PM
That's very interesting. Do people get into ice sailing on the lake?
Every 5-6 years the lake freezes over - is smooth - and the snow has not come yet. So, there could be a few days where ice boating is possible - but, it is rare.

Patrad Fischroy
11-30-2007, 08:33 AM
I recall a few years when the upper reaches of Great Bay would freeze over pretty well, except for the channel areas, when the tide went out the ice would fall with teh water, buckle, break up and run hard out under the Newington Bridge. But in the area of the mudflats he ice would just rest on the flats and gently rise and fall. I spent some very cold days out there trying to sample the mud through a foot and a half of ice.

Mike D
11-30-2007, 12:27 PM
I spent some very cold days out there trying to sample the mud through a foot and a half of ice.

Yummm, tasty mud.

Steve M
11-30-2007, 08:25 PM
Yummm, tasty mud.
No.... stinky mud!

Charlie
12-01-2007, 07:00 PM
many years ago i sold a pickup with new tires on it and the first thing the new oner did was to take the tires off and put tons of screws in them and then put a tube in it . and i asked why he said he got this truck to do some ice racing on a lake . i said i hope IT was cold enough :eek:

Mike D
12-01-2007, 08:34 PM
many years ago i sold a pickup with new tires on it and the first thing the new oner did was to take the tires off and put tons of screws in them and then put a tube in it . and i asked why he said he got this truck to do some ice racing on a lake . i said i hope IT was cold enough :eek:

Sounds like he was going screw-tubin'.

Charlie
12-02-2007, 11:42 AM
i wonder if brad will let us do this to his truck and go out on his lake for a drive :D

Brad
12-02-2007, 04:08 PM
i wonder if brad will let us do this to his truck and go out on his lake for a drive :D
When was that other place freezing over?

Steve M
12-02-2007, 05:29 PM
When was that other place freezing over?
Probably never at the rate we are warming:rolleyes:

Charlie
12-02-2007, 06:39 PM
Probably never at the rate we are warming:rolleyes:

we cant do this on your car we need to put skies on yours ,no frezing lakes down there