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View Full Version : Better than the cog railway?



spyboy
12-07-2007, 10:33 PM
Wow, this really puts the cog to shame. It's truly amazing what us crazy upright apes can do :)

http://englishrussia.com/?p=1676

mk10
12-08-2007, 03:08 AM
That's got to be one of the coolest things I've ever seen. Thanks.

Steve M
12-08-2007, 08:58 AM
That's got to be one of the coolest things I've ever seen. Thanks.
Yea I agree, I thought is was gonna be a lock but I was fooled.:)

Proweaver
12-08-2007, 11:09 AM
I live Pittsburgh,Pa and love watching the towboats go through the locks. That sure is cooler the our locks !!!!!!

Bill O
12-08-2007, 03:50 PM
Where is that thing?

spyboy
12-08-2007, 05:23 PM
In Krasnoyarsk, Russia

Here's a link to google maps: http://tinyurl.com/39rqso

it's low res satellite though :(

The track runs to the right of the river, between the dam and the bridge.

Charlie
12-08-2007, 06:02 PM
Wow, this really puts the cog to shame. It's truly amazing what us crazy upright apes can do :)

http://englishrussia.com/?p=1676


i click on it and it will not open ,must be some thing on my end

Brad
12-08-2007, 06:34 PM
That is amazing. It reminds me of a set of pictures I saw several years ago http://koti.mbnet.fi/~soldier/towboat.htm

Steve M
12-08-2007, 07:41 PM
That is amazing. It reminds me of a set of pictures I saw several years ago http://koti.mbnet.fi/~soldier/towboat.htm
I'll bet that was quite a day! One you want to go home straight away and get some sleep!

Bill O
12-08-2007, 07:58 PM
While it certainly is cool to see it is an incredibly complicated contraption. Boat lifts, locks and canals were all the rage before 1910. With the Panama Canal culminating that craze. It puzzles me why the Soviets were busy building these things when the rest of the modern world had moved on.

It would be like somebody installing a cog railway at a ski area instead of a modern chair lift.

Patrad Fischroy
12-08-2007, 09:35 PM
Shipping on water is still the most economical means of getting large amounts of goods from one place to another. And if a dam is in the way, this may be the best way to get around it. And as far as the Panama Canal goes, there is currently a project starting to basically double the size at the cost of about $5 billlion.

http://news.independent.co.uk/business/news/article3157803.ece

It was the smaller canals that were not able to successfully compete against the railroads

Bill O
12-08-2007, 09:51 PM
Shipping on water is still the most economical means of getting large amounts of goods from one place to another. And if a dam is in the way, this may be the best way to get around it. And as far as the Panama Canal goes, there is currently a project starting to basically double the size at the cost of about $5 billlion.

http://news.independent.co.uk/business/news/article3157803.ece

It was the smaller canals that were not able to successfully compete against the railroads

I agree, water is cheap. And there's no argument from me about Panama or Suez Canal type projects. A 30 mile trip across Panama is much easier than a 10,000 mile trip around Cape Horn. If only they had made it a sea level canal as originally planned.

I'm still interested in learning where that thing is. A large reservoir somewhere in Russia that apparently is still moving quite a bit of cargo by water.

Bill O
12-08-2007, 09:54 PM
It was the smaller canals that were not able to successfully compete against the railroads

Its amazing the canals that used to traverse the east. From the well known Erie Canal to canals connecting Lake Erie and the Ohio River in West Virginia. I think there's an old canal/rail system that connected the Potomac and Pittsburgh.

Patrad Fischroy
12-10-2007, 08:30 AM
Its amazing the canals that used to traverse the east. From the well known Erie Canal to canals connecting Lake Erie and the Ohio River in West Virginia. I think there's an old canal/rail system that connected the Potomac and Pittsburgh.


Do you mean this one?

http://www.atatrail.org/

A portion of this trail runs from DC out to Cumberland, MD on the towpath ot the C&O canal. The whole trail system runs west to Pittsburgh

Bill O
12-10-2007, 06:26 PM
That's it. There was an article about that in a recent NG Adventure Magazine.