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bclark
02-14-2008, 03:55 PM
So after many months of getting particulars ironed out, the partnership between AccuWeather.com and the Observatory is complete! My blog went live on AccuWeather.com this afternoon. It can be viewed on the free site here:

http://www.accuweather.com/news-blogs.asp?partner=accuweather&blog=clarkb

The link that we have to accuweather.com at the bottom of the front page of our website will soon be changed to take you directly to my blog. Using that link to access it is the best way to do it so that AccuWeather sees us driving people to their website :)

Brad
02-16-2008, 09:28 AM
Very cool. Plus, you even got a nice plug in your father's blog!

Bill O
03-13-2008, 08:42 PM
I was just checking Brian's blog. There's some good stuff in there about the historic snowfall in the valleys and some reasons why the summit is lagging behind.

At our place in the Champlain Valley of VT we are in a similar situation to the summit. Sort of. Just to the south in Ludlow (Okemo) I have never seen snow that deep in Vermont. But as soon as you head into the valley its a different story. Maybe not for the exact same reasons as the summit. But we are getting some shadowing from the mountains. The biggest storms just left us dry and the warmer storms left us wet.

Oh well. With a cold second half of the month on tap I'm rooting for those records to fall across southern New Hampshire.

bclark
03-14-2008, 11:15 AM
But as soon as you head into the valley its a different story. Maybe not for the exact same reasons as the summit. But we are getting some shadowing from the mountains. The biggest storms just left us dry and the warmer storms left us wet.

This could actually continue to support the idea that the bulk of the moisture associated with storms this winter has stayed in the low levels, allowing mountains to create that shadow.

Bill O
03-14-2008, 08:52 PM
This could actually continue to support the idea that the bulk of the moisture associated with storms this winter has stayed in the low levels, allowing mountains to create that shadow.

On Mount Rainier snowfall peaks right around the Paradise elevation and decreases higher on the mountain. I wouldn't say that there is a fixed global elevation that snowfall peaks, but it is well accepted that for a particular type of storm there is a sweet spot. In this case, below the summit of Mount Washington.

Add to that the intricacies of collecting snow on a peak in a high wind environment.

I wonder what totals are like over in Lisbon and Bath, NH? I used to drive through those towns in winter and they always had very little snow on the ground. According to the Extreme Weather book that is the driest area in the state.