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JimS
03-20-2008, 08:28 AM
A huge pressure gradient is setting up behind this storm, and winds could easily be the highest of the year...

I have my guess in at 148mph for the peak early Saturday Morning...

On a side note, we've seen the pictures of the HEAVY icing at treeline right now on Tim/Vals pictures. I'm very concerned about tree damage with this storm...

Deadline for entry....11:59 PM tonight (Thursday)

Patrad Fischroy
03-20-2008, 08:51 AM
Put me down for 132MPH for whatever reason

Bill O
03-20-2008, 08:53 AM
xxxmph.

It was pretty warm up there last night, don't you think most of that ice is gone?

Edit....changed to 150mph below

JimS
03-20-2008, 09:04 AM
It was pretty warm, but there was also alot of ice...
I suspect you're likely right though... much of it probably came down...the forest dodges a bullet!

spyboy
03-20-2008, 09:50 AM
157.8 mph :)

mtruman
03-20-2008, 11:22 AM
I'm in for 142

edog2007
03-20-2008, 02:47 PM
165 mph.:eek:

tdb1977
03-20-2008, 04:53 PM
160.2 MPH from this event. Its going to be a big blow

Brad
03-20-2008, 06:31 PM
140.0 mph for me

KD Talbot
03-20-2008, 06:59 PM
144mph

KDT

Steve M
03-20-2008, 07:00 PM
I'll go with 138 mph.

Bill O
03-20-2008, 07:23 PM
165 mph.:eek:

That's close to a 30 year high.

a3dad
03-20-2008, 07:54 PM
I'll guess 130.

Bill O
03-20-2008, 07:56 PM
Front rolled through my place in VT around 6:15pm.

http://www.wunderground.com/weatherstation/WXDailyHistory.asp?ID=KVTWHITI1

edog2007
03-20-2008, 08:03 PM
That's close to a 30 year high.
Wouldn't surprise me if it did get this high,because of the unnormal weather we have been getting.

Bill O
03-20-2008, 08:24 PM
Wouldn't surprise me if it did get this high,because of the unnormal weather we have been getting.

Its certainly possible.

What time does this poll close? I vote on soon.

Charlie
03-20-2008, 08:26 PM
i'm in for 143 mph

JimS
03-20-2008, 08:28 PM
Deadline for entry....11:59 PM tonight (Thursday)

Peak winds shouldn't come until sunset tomorrow...with a few 'little' peaks along the way...

Brad
03-20-2008, 08:44 PM
109.5 mph so far

http://images34.fotki.com/v1123/photos/1/1002902/5957535/20080320_203926_conditions-vi.jpg

Bill O
03-20-2008, 08:47 PM
Peak winds shouldn't come until sunset tomorrow...with a few 'little' peaks along the way...

I just noticed that in the MOS data. ETA peaking at 98kts.

I'm changing my guess to 150mph.

Bill O
03-20-2008, 08:48 PM
Good thing I changed my guess. Wind just hit 123mph.

Bill O
03-21-2008, 11:10 AM
Making new highs right now, 125mph gust.

Did anybody put together a consolidated list of guesses?

Breeze
03-21-2008, 11:51 AM
152 MPH my guess!

DANG Pinkham Notch was a nasty place to be this morning! White out across the road at Great Glen at 8 AM and still hardpack snow-ice surface on 16 @ 10:30.

Breeze

JimS
03-21-2008, 12:10 PM
a3dad 130
Patrad 132
wsr88d 138
Brad 140
mtruman 142
charlie 143
KD talbot 144
JimS 148
Bill O 150
Breeze 152*
spyboy 158
tdb1977 160
edog2007 165

SOOSE
03-21-2008, 12:18 PM
at 12:01 pm 128.8 mph

RI Swamp Yankee
03-21-2008, 12:21 PM
My after the deadline guess = 154 mph

parnelli
03-21-2008, 03:07 PM
http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.png


what kind a party food are youall having up there? :D

edog2007
03-21-2008, 04:09 PM
http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.png


what kind a party food are youall having up there? :D

It was close to that a couple weeks ago.:cool:

JimS
03-21-2008, 09:18 PM
Wahoooo@!

Just hit 148+

Stay safe up there folks!

edog2007
03-21-2008, 09:36 PM
Come on baby 165 mph:eek:

Charlie
03-21-2008, 10:00 PM
lets see a new record up there tonight :D

treant985
03-21-2008, 11:34 PM
It looks like today may be one of those rare ones where the average wind speed is 100+ mph.

I believe the last one was Jan 16, 2006, which had an avg speed of 101.9 mph. The highest in recent times was 116.8 mph on Dec 4, 1980. It's only happened nine times since 1940 according to a list that one of the MWO staff was nice enough to send me a few months back.

And, for any 24-hour period, I believe the record was 129.0 mph, from 4pm Apr 11 to 4pm Apr 12, 1934.

JimS
03-22-2008, 05:20 AM
Looks like 148.5 is going to stick...Not quite cat 5, but still a very good wind!

Looks like JimS is our winner...Congrats to JimS!

edog2007
03-22-2008, 06:48 AM
Congrats!!!!

Did any body go outside up there?:eek:

Steve M
03-22-2008, 07:11 AM
Looks like 148.5 is going to stick...Not quite cat 5, but still a very good wind!

Looks like JimS is our winner...Congrats to JimS!
Yea, we know, you had this contest fixed right from the beginning.:D ;) :rolleyes: :p

mtruman
03-22-2008, 08:11 AM
So where did this put the lowest wind chill figure? It's showing -52F right now with temp of -10 and 80-90MPH. Not sure how the wind chill calc works with peak gusts.

KD Talbot
03-22-2008, 09:07 AM
Looks like JimS is our winner...Congrats to JimS!

JimS

That is some big wind!:D

KDT

treant985
03-22-2008, 09:39 AM
Looks like yesterday (with an average wind speed of 104.5 mph) was the windiest day since Dec 4, 1980, when the average wind for the day was 116.8 mph. Their peak gust that day was 178mph.

spyboy
03-22-2008, 09:47 AM
Or did I say 158? I meant to type 148 :) LOL!!!! Yeah, that's it..

Bill O
03-22-2008, 10:25 AM
Um, hold on there. According to the MWO website the peak wind gust was 149mph. We measure wind speed to the nearest whole mile per hour, and even that is pushing it.

It looks like a tie between Jim and I.

Bill O
03-22-2008, 10:32 AM
Looks like yesterday (with an average wind speed of 104.5 mph) was the windiest day since Dec 4, 1980, when the average wind for the day was 116.8 mph. Their peak gust that day was 178mph.

I can always count on you to dig up that data. Do you mind double checking that? That is pretty big news if that verifies. The windiest day since the windiest day in the new building.

Steve M
03-22-2008, 12:26 PM
I must say for a while there last night I thought I had it but one gust put me out of the running.

Brad
03-22-2008, 12:30 PM
Um, hold on there. According to the MWO website the peak wind gust was 149mph. We measure wind speed to the nearest whole mile per hour, and even that is pushing it.

It looks like a tie between Jim and I.
Well, you could say that it is a tie using that level of precision. But, we all would know you were off 3 times the amount JimS was off.

Bill O
03-22-2008, 01:10 PM
But, we all would know you were off 3 times the amount JimS was off.

Three times off...that is bad.

The official peak gust is still 149mph.

treant985
03-22-2008, 01:35 PM
I can always count on you to dig up that data. Do you mind double checking that? That is pretty big news if that verifies. The windiest day since the windiest day in the new building.

The info came from Thomas Seidel, a Staff Scientist at MWO, who went through the staff database for 1935-2004 data and found all cases of mean wind of 100+ mph for a given day (midnight to midnight). I also have copies of the monthly reports that MWO sends to the NCDC in Asheville, so that let me check the info since 2004.

Here are the windiest days since 1940, thanks to Mr. Seidel:

12/04/1980: 116.8 mph
01/02/1943: 108.0 mph
03/21/2008: 104.5 mph
12/26/2000: 102.8 mph
04/05/1995: 102.0 mph
01/16/2006: 101.9 mph
04/03/1970: 101.4 mph
11/13/1990: 101.0 mph
01/02/1969: 100.0 mph
01/09/1985: 100.0 mph

...there have been 42 days since 1940 where MWO had a peak wind of 150+ MPH.

bclark
03-22-2008, 06:03 PM
since Dec 4, 1980, when the average wind for the day was 116.8 mph. Their peak gust that day was 178mph.


Actually, the Hays Chart for that day reads a peak wind gust of 182 mph. I suppose I shouldn't say the chart "reads" that speed because a speed of 182 is off the chart on the Hays. These days, gusts over 140 are recorded on the Barton Chart...I'm not sure how they recorded gusts over 140 in 1980. The peak gust of 182 mph is simply written on the Hays chart. That's one of the night observer duties.

We have that Hays Chart on display on the Weather Wall because it stands not only as the windiest day in the Sherman Adams Building, but also as the second highest wind gust MWO has recorded, next to the "Big Wind".

Was the data you have for that day from Tom S., or from NCDC?? I'm curious why we have two different peak wind gusts on record for that day.

edog2007
03-22-2008, 06:18 PM
Wow,thats just crazy wind.Time to fly a kite.:D

treant985
03-22-2008, 07:58 PM
Actually, the Hays Chart for that day reads a peak wind gust of 182 mph. I suppose I shouldn't say the chart "reads" that speed because a speed of 182 is off the chart on the Hays. These days, gusts over 140 are recorded on the Barton Chart...I'm not sure how they recorded gusts over 140 in 1980. The peak gust of 182 mph is simply written on the Hays chart. That's one of the night observer duties.

We have that Hays Chart on display on the Weather Wall because it stands not only as the windiest day in the Sherman Adams Building, but also as the second highest wind gust MWO has recorded, next to the "Big Wind".

Was the data you have for that day from Tom S., or from NCDC?? I'm curious why we have two different peak wind gusts on record for that day.

Tom also sent me a list of days with 150+ mph peak gusts, and it shows 178 for that 12/4/1980. Also, I'm not able to access them right now, but I do believe that NCDC showed the same thing, which makes sense since they just have photocopies of what MWO sent to them.

Also, the page on this site that lists records shows 178 as the record wind for December: http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/normals.php .

I do recall that Tom and I noticed a few places where the NCDC photocopies didn't match what Tom's database showed. A few of them were chalked up to where the observer put the observation in knots in one spot, and in MPH in another. But there were others that had slight differences that we couldn't explain...

bclark
03-22-2008, 08:05 PM
Tom also sent me a list of days with 150+ mph peak gusts, and it shows 178 for that 12/4/1980. Also, I'm not able to access them right now, but I do believe that NCDC showed the same thing, which makes sense since they just have photocopies of what MWO sent to them.

Also, the page on this site that lists records shows 178 as the record wind for December: http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/normals.php .

Very interesting. I'll have to look into this during my next shift and find out which one is correct. Then we need to at least make sure the correct peak gust is displayed in the places we have the power to change. Obviously, the NCDC records are not one of those things.

I've always been under the impression that 182 was correct since I see it on the Hays chart and tell every tour that I give that it was 182 on that day.



A few of them were chalked up to where the observer put the observation in knots in one spot, and in MPH in another. But there were others that had slight differences that we couldn't explain..

I don't doubt that has caused some confusion at times, however there is no way that is the case regarding December 4, 1980. 178 knots = 205 mph.

Neil
03-22-2008, 10:54 PM
Thought I'd add my two cents since I know a thing or two about the Hays chart...

1.) The hays chart is calibrated for an assumed standard pressure and temperature. Namely the average barometric pressure and temperature for MWO. Since the device works off a differential pressure transducer this means that large temperature or pressure variations away from the normal will have a noticeable impact on the recorded windspeed. In order to come up with the actual speed a relatively straightforward calculation needs to be performed using the displacement measured on the chart, the air temperature, and the actual pressure. Technically moisture content of the air could be considered as well but especially at low temperatures it has a rather neglible impact.

2.) The above discussion is why there is a discrepency between what is written on the hays chart and what is officially recorded on the obseravtory F6 and thus with the NCDC as well. After correcting for temp/pressure, the true gust is 178 for Dec 4 1980.

3.) As far as the Hays chart being able to record winds up to 180ish range... First of all it couldn't, the Dec 4th chart has the peaks well off the page. There was a second hays chart, calibrated for 15 inches of water instead of 10". This was used similarly to the way the Barton is currently used. Furtheremore the Hays chart that currently reads to around 145 mph is no longer a 0-10" chart. It was damaged in the late 1990s and then recalibrated to compensate for the damage. It is now only good up to around 8 or 9 inchs of displaced water column. This explains why the charts that are from the big wind summer wind of 1996 could be record peaks above 150 mph on the Hays while yesterdays 148.5 gust topped the chart.

4.) Unless things have changed since I left, the 148.5 was not measured with the Hays at all. It was measured with a second device, the setra pressure transducer which is a digital device that ranges from 0-30 inches of water displacement. It is an excellent device with high precision, accuracy and response time. It was calibrated at the factory in the summer of 2006 and should be considered the gold standard. The charts are excellent back up however. Also unless things have changed with automation in the data base the setra wind speed would still need to be corrected for pressure and temperature. Could make a difference of a few mph.

Other than that, glad to see the summit getting some good winds.
And Jim, glad to see you've still got a knack for nailing the wind speeds.

Brian, thats probably my fault for never explaining that the Hays chart for 1980 was actually a bit off. It was just easier to tell tours the number on the chart than to launch into the above discussion.

-Neil

Brad
03-23-2008, 07:11 AM
Neil, excellent post - and even I understood it.

edog2007
03-23-2008, 07:48 AM
Thought I'd add my two cents since I know a thing or two about the Hays chart...

1.) The hays chart is calibrated for an assumed standard pressure and temperature. Namely the average barometric pressure and temperature for MWO. Since the device works off a differential pressure transducer this means that large temperature or pressure variations away from the normal will have a noticeable impact on the recorded windspeed. In order to come up with the actual speed a relatively straightforward calculation needs to be performed using the displacement measured on the chart, the air temperature, and the actual pressure. Technically moisture content of the air could be considered as well but especially at low temperatures it has a rather neglible impact.

2.) The above discussion is why there is a discrepency between what is written on the hays chart and what is officially recorded on the obseravtory F6 and thus with the NCDC as well. After correcting for temp/pressure, the true gust is 178 for Dec 4 1980.

3.) As far as the Hays chart being able to record winds up to 180ish range... First of all it couldn't, the Dec 4th chart has the peaks well off the page. There was a second hays chart, calibrated for 15 inches of water instead of 10". This was used similarly to the way the Barton is currently used. Furtheremore the Hays chart that currently reads to around 145 mph is no longer a 0-10" chart. It was damaged in the late 1990s and then recalibrated to compensate for the damage. It is now only good up to around 8 or 9 inchs of displaced water column. This explains why the charts that are from the big wind summer wind of 1996 could be record peaks above 150 mph on the Hays while yesterdays 148.5 gust topped the chart.

4.) Unless things have changed since I left, the 148.5 was not measured with the Hays at all. It was measured with a second device, the setra pressure transducer which is a digital device that ranges from 0-30 inches of water displacement. It is an excellent device with high precision, accuracy and response time. It was calibrated at the factory in the summer of 2006 and should be considered the gold standard. The charts are excellent back up however. Also unless things have changed with automation in the data base the setra wind speed would still need to be corrected for pressure and temperature. Could make a difference of a few mph.

Other than that, glad to see the summit getting some good winds.
And Jim, glad to see you've still got a knack for nailing the wind speeds.

Brian, thats probably my fault for never explaining that the Hays chart for 1980 was actually a bit off. It was just easier to tell tours the number on the chart than to launch into the above discussion.

-Neil
Very helpful info:)

I was wondering if you have any pics of these measuring devices?

Thanks

Eric

Brad
03-23-2008, 09:40 AM
Here is the Hays Chart for March 21, 2008

http://images34.fotki.com/v1125/photos/1/1002902/4071997/IMG_4450-vi.jpg

mtruman
03-24-2008, 09:54 AM
Wow,thats just crazy wind.Time to fly a kite.:D
So are you saying that this would have worked better if the wind was 180+ ? :rolleyes:

http://lh6.google.com/mtruman42/RrDTw2n6cfI/AAAAAAAAAP0/PygBzE7t2lw/s800/IMG_2296.JPG.jpg

This is Jack who we met at Lakes hut last summer. This is how he spent his 70th birthday!

edog2007
03-24-2008, 12:42 PM
So are you saying that this would have worked better if the wind was 180+ ? :rolleyes:

http://lh6.google.com/mtruman42/RrDTw2n6cfI/AAAAAAAAAP0/PygBzE7t2lw/s800/IMG_2296.JPG.jpg

This is Jack who we met at Lakes hut last summer. This is how he spent his 70th birthday!
It would be a BLAST!!!!

bclark
03-27-2008, 09:18 AM
Thought I'd add my two cents since I know a thing or two about the Hays chart...

Thanks for all that info Neil. That actually answered several questions I have had for a while and always forget to ask Ken...assuming he knows the answers.


Also unless things have changed with automation in the data base the setra wind speed would still need to be corrected for pressure and temperature. Could make a difference of a few mph.

Nothing has changed in the sense that there still isn't an automated process in place to determine the "real wind". This wind event has certainly opened up a can of worms regarding that subject.


Brian, thats probably my fault for never explaining that the Hays chart for 1980 was actually a bit off. It was just easier to tell tours the number on the chart than to launch into the above discussion.

No worries. You're right, it is much easier just to tell them the gust was 182. The majority of the people on our tours in the summer probably wouldn't care to hear that entire explanation anyways. Afterall, it is only a 2% difference.

bclark
03-27-2008, 11:19 AM
As Neil pointed out, wind speeds/gusts measured by the Setra pressure transducer are not corrected for temperature and pressure. Therefore, the 148.5 mph gust is not entirely accurate considering the actual temperature and pressure outside at the time the wind gust was measured.

I was unable to use the Setra to calculate the corrected wind gust because we only save the high resolution differential pressure data used by our computer database to calculate that gust for 20 minutes. So, the Barton high speed wind chart had to be used to calculate it.

So after running through the proper calculations, the official corrected wind gust is.....(drum roll please).....

136.5 mph

That also means that my buddy Mr. Jim is not the winner of this contest. It is actually WSR88D with a guess of 138 mph. And no Jim, you can't argue that your guess was for the uncorrected wind gust. You should have known from that start that 148.5 was uncorrected :p Perhaps in the future it will be best to specify that guesses are for CORRECTED gusts.

Look for a more detailed writeup about this in the observer comments at some point later today.

JimS
03-27-2008, 01:27 PM
As Neil pointed out, wind speeds/gusts measured by the Setra pressure transducer are not corrected for temperature and pressure. Therefore, the 148.5 mph gust is not entirely accurate considering the actual temperature and pressure outside at the time the wind gust was measured.

I was unable to use the Setra to calculate the corrected wind gust because we only save the high resolution differential pressure data used by our computer database to calculate that gust for 20 minutes. So, the Barton high speed wind chart had to be used to calculate it.

So after running through the proper calculations, the official corrected wind gust is.....(drum roll please).....

136.5 mph

That also means that by buddy Mr. Jim is not the winner of this contest. It is actually WSR88D with a guess of 138 mph. And no Jim, you can't argue that your guess was for the uncorrected wind gust. You should have known from that start that 148.5 was uncorrected :p Perhaps in the future it will be best to specify that guesses are for CORRECTED gusts.

Look for a more detailed writeup about this in the observer comments at some point later today.


Oh you guys and your new math...I'm only calabrated to compute data the uncorrected way...

You win...

Congrats to WSR88D

Bill O
03-27-2008, 02:11 PM
137 versus 149? That's not a trivial difference.

I'm going to ponder the ramifications of this. In general should I look at the MWO wind data and think that speed is within 10% of the actual number?

bclark
03-27-2008, 02:32 PM
137 versus 149? That's not a trivial difference.

I agree that it is not a trivial difference, however I also wouldn't call it a significant difference. Afterall, it is "only' an 8% correction.


In general should I look at the MWO wind data and think that speed is within 10% of the actual number?

Absolutely not.

First of all, the correction curve is not linear by any means. A lower wind speed at the exact same temperature and pressure as this most current big gust would not have as big of a correction. For instance, a gust of 101 mph under the same conditions as this gust, recorded by the Barton chart(4.25 inches of displaced water column) would only need a trivial 2% correction to 99 mph.

Additionally, different temperatures and pressures will cause big changes in the correction. I will get into this more in the observer comment I am working on, but I will explain briefly here. The Barton high speed wind chart was calibrated for a temperature of 27 degrees F, according to my boss Ken. I would assume it was calibrated to a "standard pressure" of 800 millibars. The closer the outdoor temperature and pressure is to these values at the time the wind is measured, the more accurate the uncorrected value will be. For this instance, the Barton read 8.125 inches of water, which roughly equates to 140 mph. That means that 137 mph is only a 2% correction. Again, this is small enough to consider trivial in my book.

The Setra pressure transducer, the device used to measure the 148.5 mph gust, works slightly differently. That will be explained in the observer comment.

Bill O
03-27-2008, 02:35 PM
Thanks for the clarification. Makes us accuracy snobs feel much better.

bclark
03-27-2008, 02:39 PM
...I'm only calabrated to compute data the uncorrected way...

Perhaps you should calibrate yourself to spell correctly. Darn science teachers.

:p

bclark
03-27-2008, 02:40 PM
Thanks for the clarification. Makes us accuracy snobs feel much better.

No problem Bill....glad that made sense.

JimS
03-27-2008, 03:04 PM
Perhaps you should calibrate yourself to spell correctly. Darn science teachers.

:p

Me fail english, tha'ts unpossible!

Neil
03-27-2008, 03:54 PM
As Neil pointed out, wind speeds/gusts measured by the Setra pressure transducer are not corrected for temperature and pressure. Therefore, the 148.5 mph gust is not entirely accurate considering the actual temperature and pressure outside at the time the wind gust was measured.

I was unable to use the Setra to calculate the corrected wind gust because we only save the high resolution differential pressure data used by our computer database to calculate that gust for 20 minutes. So, the Barton high speed wind chart had to be used to calculate it.

So after running through the proper calculations, the official corrected wind gust is.....(drum roll please).....

136.5 mph

That also means that my buddy Mr. Jim is not the winner of this contest. It is actually WSR88D with a guess of 138 mph. And no Jim, you can't argue that your guess was for the uncorrected wind gust. You should have known from that start that 148.5 was uncorrected :p Perhaps in the future it will be best to specify that guesses are for CORRECTED gusts.

Look for a more detailed writeup about this in the observer comments at some point later today.

Equations by definition work both ways. You should be able to use the measured wind speed from the Setra, resolve the equations back to to a differential pressure in inches of water, and then recalculate for temp/pressure errors. The setra actually works more or less identically to everything else, an inch of water is an inch of water, regardless of the device. Thus the same equation that you use for the Barton applies to the setra.

I'll try to take a look at it this evening if I get a chance.

Use the setra. It is far more sensitive than the Barton. Also was the needle on the Barton changed prior to the storm? if not it was probably dried up, and had a lot of frictional drag, hence the lower speed. As a note: the setra and barton agreed extremely well for the 158 mph event back in October of 06.

Lastly, the corrections are typically only applied for record setting gusts... not just any big wind.

-Neil

Brad
03-27-2008, 07:07 PM
Perhaps you should calibrate yourself to spell correctly. Darn science teachers.

:p
If you can only spell things one way you are lacking in creativity.

bclark
03-27-2008, 07:22 PM
Use the setra. It is far more sensitive than the Barton.

Ok, so I have learned a lot over the last couple days in dealing with correcting this wind gust for temperature and pressure. Neil is right, the Setra is a much better device to use to determine the corrected wind speed. I used the equation we use to turn the differential pressure measurement from the Setra into a wind speed, and solved for the differential pressure created during the 148.5 wind gust that the Setra measured assuming a standard temperature and pressure. This gave a measurement of 9.13 inches of displaced water column.

Then, I recalculated the corrected wind speed using this differential pressure instead of the one from the Barton chart. This gave me a corrected wind gust of 144.6 mph. This is only a 2.6% correction from the 148.5 gust originally measured

This is going to be the final and official corrected wind gust for this event...and I'm serious this time. :)

So, that changes the winner of the contest yet again. Sorry WSR88D, it is actually KD who is the winner with a guess of 144.

KD Talbot
03-27-2008, 07:59 PM
Yah, eye noo dat! :p Me go sweep floor and empty trash now. Yoo beeg 4-head guys need NE mor cal-q-lay-shuns, u lemme no.

KDT

Brad
03-28-2008, 06:18 AM
Yah, eye noo dat! :p Me go sweep floor and empty trash now. Yoo beeg 4-head guys need NE mor cal-q-lay-shuns, u lemme no.

KDT
Can I have your order graph?