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View Full Version : CNET Senior Editor missing (Winter Survival)



spyboy
12-05-2006, 10:46 AM
Has anyone been following the story about CNET's Senior Editor James Kim, who was vacationing over Thanksgiving from San Francisco to Oregon, and is now missing?

When he and his wife didn't show up for appointments on tuesday, their colleagues were worried because they usually keep in contact everyday by phone or email.

There was heavy snow in the mountains where they were travelling during the Thanksgiving weekend.

Yesterday they found his wife and 2 children alive and well at their car, on a remote logging road. James had left 2 days earlier to get help and hasn't been located yet.

Here's more info, on the blog that he writes for CNET: http://crave.cnet.com/ (http://crave.cnet.com/8301-1_105-9666094-1.html?tag=head)

From what the family said, they used the car heater until the gas ran out, then burned tires to stay warm, and conserved their food.

This definately brings up the discussion of winter survival. Even driving around in the northern part of New Hampshire, I always try to have an emergency kit with me, extra food, blankets, shovel. A quick spin off a road and over the side, and you might not be seen even if you're only 20 feet from the road, especially if it's snowing.

spyboy
12-05-2006, 10:48 AM
What suprised me is the road they were travelling on to head to the coast.

NF-23 is a remote logging road. I don't know why someone would travel that kind of road in winter.

map of route (http://news.com.com/2300-1028_3-6140554-1.html)

Bill O
12-05-2006, 12:05 PM
I was under the impression they accidentally took that road, but I may be wrong.

I don't understand what could have possibly happened with the husband? Wouldn't you hike back the way you came? Why would he leave the road? It reminds me of the story of "Alive." Not one of the survivors considered walking down the valley that they crashed in. Instead, they climbed back over the highest passes. Save for Antarctica, all glacier filled valleys lead to rivers and all rivers lead down.

Patrad Fischroy
12-06-2006, 08:27 AM
As has been said, hypothermia can be very disorienting. Judgement suffers greatly.

Bill O
12-06-2006, 09:28 AM
As has been said, hypothermia can be very disorienting. Judgement suffers greatly.

This will certainly revive the debate of whether to stay with the car or go for help.

spyboy
12-06-2006, 03:47 PM
He stayed with his family for about 7 days before heading out for help.

How long can one sit there, not doing anything? I know most survival experts say stay put, you'll be found, but after a week, I'd head out too, I'd rather try to find help, than be found frozen solid at my car.

Patrad Fischroy
12-06-2006, 04:13 PM
News now is that his body was found.

Bill O
12-06-2006, 05:01 PM
He stayed with his family for about 7 days before heading out for help.

How long can one sit there, not doing anything? I know most survival experts say stay put, you'll be found, but after a week, I'd head out too, I'd rather try to find help, than be found frozen solid at my car.

Look who survived though. What drives you to leave the car on day seven and not on day six? We could debate this to no end, but what I want to know is why he left the road?

Charlie
12-06-2006, 09:15 PM
how far did he walk on the road before turning off . if he was on it for some time ,maybe hypothermia was setting in and he did not know he was off the road. or if he was having hypothermia he may have bin hallucinating ?

Gorque
12-07-2006, 07:48 AM
how far did he walk on the road before turning off . if he was on it for some time ,maybe hypothermia was setting in and he did not know he was off the road. or if he was having hypothermia he may have bin hallucinating ?
The radio report this a.m. said he was found about a mile from his car near a creek.

Edit: Another news report says it was 8 miles, which makes more sense.

gonewandering
12-07-2006, 11:34 AM
The radio report this a.m. said he was found about a mile from his car near a creek.

Edit: Another news report says it was 8 miles, which makes more sense.

I heard that He walked 8 Miles but ended up only a mile from the car in a ravine (went in a circle) and that they think He may have left the road because a bear was following Him, they found bear tracks.... but I've been wrong before!
Either way a very sad story....

EC

spyboy
12-07-2006, 02:32 PM
Well, it sucks no matter what. It definately was a result of poor planning (they took the wrong road). It's ashame someone has to die for the public to become more aware of how proper planning (not just packing extra food and clothes for a mountain trip, but also analyzing your route) can be a life saver.