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spyboy
06-26-2008, 03:19 PM
I'm heading up to Pittsburg, NH tomorrow to camp and kayak.

Does anyone know where I can get (online hopefully) current lake temperatures for Lake Francis and the First Connecticut Lake?

Just trying to get an idea of how cold or warm the water is up there, so I can pack appropriately.

Kirk

KD Talbot
06-26-2008, 04:12 PM
Have they had ice out yet?

KDT

Brad
06-26-2008, 04:42 PM
When I did them they were "cool" not too cold. It got warmer as we came down the CT River to VT.

Now, this trip was a few years ago (47 years ago to be exact) and it was a fantastic trip! Just try to find out if the dam will be doing a major release of water into the river if you plan on coming down the river below the lakes. That can get a bit hairy.

Bill O
06-26-2008, 05:56 PM
Lake Champlain is 67F. Not sure if that helps.

My guess is not that cold. They're not Lake Superior or even close to that depth.

spyboy
06-26-2008, 07:48 PM
Lake Winnipesaukee is 69.

http://www.winnipesaukee.com/tempcal/index.cgi

I guess it's a safe assumption that the water is in the high 60's.

I have a heavy paddle jacket, with gaskets on the wrists, I think that's overkill (I usually use that in Penobscot Bay) I'll pack it in my truck just incase, but it probably won't go in my kayak.

Kirk

Steve M
06-26-2008, 07:48 PM
Have they had ice out yet?

KDT

Now THAT was funny!:D

Bill O
06-26-2008, 08:10 PM
60 is my dividing line. A dunk in anything above 60 might be cold but its manageable. Below 60 is a different story.

Brad
06-26-2008, 08:45 PM
We use the 100 degree rule for waterskiing. If the air and water temps combined is 100 or more, go waterski. Below 100, think twice, check for icebergs, then go waterski.

spyboy
06-26-2008, 09:33 PM
It gets extreme when you're holding the tow handle with one hand, and chipping ice with the other :)


We use the 100 degree rule for waterskiing. If the air and water temps combined is 100 or more, go waterski. Below 100, think twice, check for icebergs, then go waterski.

Brad
06-27-2008, 06:46 AM
Have a good trip!

Neil
06-27-2008, 04:33 PM
You can find the water temp for the CT river a bit downstream here:
http://www.met.utah.edu/cgi-bin/droman/meso_base.cgi?stn=PTSN3

I would guess the more placid water of the lake could get a bit warmer than the river temps, but I'm not sure.

And here are some decent weather obs from the first CT lake:
http://www.met.utah.edu/cgi-bin/droman/meso_base.cgi?stn=FCLN3

-Neil

Bill O
06-27-2008, 04:49 PM
I would guess the more placid water of the lake could get a bit warmer than the river temps, but I'm not sure.


The Colorado River in the Grand Canyon is known for being very cold since its fed by the deeper waters of Lake Powell.

I have no idea how that applies to the upper CT River as I know little about that region.

Neil
06-27-2008, 05:12 PM
Looking around a bit more I found the lake temps for Lake Francis which is kind of like the zero-ith CT lake:
http://amazon.nws.noaa.gov/nexhads2/jsp/interactiveDisplays/createChart.jsp?nesdis_id=033133F6&nwsli=LKFN3&pe_code=TW

I guess that answers the question. The lake is much colder than the river.

-Neil

Bill O
06-27-2008, 05:16 PM
What depth is that? A New Hampshire lake in the 40's seems very cold, even for June.

Neil
06-27-2008, 05:28 PM
It does not specify the depth of the measurement. The air temp for that site is definitely off, so perhaps the water temp is erroneous as well.
It does appear that the overall depth of the water at that location is around 80 some odd feet, which is very deep, and could account for the coldness.
Also they have the wrong lat/long for the site... which is a fairly standard practice as far as I can tell


Here is a link to the parent site that I'm working from.
http://amazon.nws.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/hads/interactiveDisplays/displayMetaData.pl?table=dcp&nwsli=LKFN3

It is kind of obscure (SHEF: Standardized Hydrological Exchange Format) data. You can look on the HADS homepage in their hand book for a guide to the variable types. That is if you want to waste your time learning about random syntax...


-Neil

Brad
06-27-2008, 07:33 PM
Looking around a bit more I found the lake temps for Lake Francis which is kind of like the zero-ith CT lake:
http://amazon.nws.noaa.gov/nexhads2/jsp/interactiveDisplays/createChart.jsp?nesdis_id=033133F6&nwsli=LKFN3&pe_code=TW

I guess that answers the question. The lake is much colder than the river.

-Neil
Neil, nice site. I looked and looked for something like this when Kirk posted his original question. I did not find anything.

I never figured why they did not start counting the CT Lakes at Lake Francis - other than it is man made and was created after naming the others. "Zero-ith Ct Lake" is so much better.