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Brad
06-26-2008, 04:37 PM
I was going to post this topic to see what kinds of things people are doing to get themselves in shape for STP08.

Then I realized I was talking with Bill O who just trotted up Ben Nevis the other day. Tim & Val wander around trying to find peaks to stroll around several times a week. Kevin is out there taking pictures of every bird that has seen a summit. Jim Salge probably does not know what it means to "get" in shape. These folks do not need to get in shape.

But, the rest of us mere mortals drive a desk during the week - and do not have the chance to climb and hike on weekends. What are you all doing to get ready? And how often? Have you even started yet?

Charlie
06-26-2008, 07:56 PM
well 2 months ago i had rotator cuff surgery and i was off work for 4 weeks and because of a lot of pain i added some weight and now i need to take it off .it is hard because i still cant use my arm at work so i walk around telling others what to do .

so every night i hit the treadmill with the elevation up all the way and try to go at at a good pace . then on the weekends i try to hit the trails around here .
i got a new back pack and i will be putting some weight in it as i hike .
and i hope it works so i can make the peak and not seek the the peek .:D

JimS
06-26-2008, 08:10 PM
I think you are right in that my spectrum of 'in shape' may be different from others, but training is important for everyone.

I find that the stadium at school is good for running up and down...up for stamina, down for balance and footwork. I find that my shoulders are often worse than my legs carrying big packs, so I try to work on them as well.

The one excercize that has helped me more than anything else though is my indo board. 15 minutes of intense rolling and my legs are shot...and it's all the same muscles that tended to get sore in the past.

http://www.indoboard.com/application/cart/index.php

Bill O
06-26-2008, 08:20 PM
People follow this site exclusively and do amazing things in the mountains: Crossfit. (http://www.crossfit.com) For them, less is more.

Things like squats, sit ups, box jumps can do far more than hours of long slow distance.

I ran 13.1 miles on Sunday and most of my training involved sprints at the track and lifting weights. My longest run before the race was a 3 x 5km (with 15 minute breaks between sets). I did that once and my only other long run was a 10k in early May.

Short, intense training is the way to go. Humans are built to walk all day long and just doing that wont make you any stronger.

Bill O
06-26-2008, 08:29 PM
If you like Crossfit and you want to build endurance check out this site: Crossfit Endurance (http://www.crossfitendurance.com/)

People follow this protocol and complete Ironman and ultra-marathons on 7 hours of training a week.

One of my favorites is the Tabata, it will burn your lungs and wear you out in just four minutes. Pick your sport, I'll choose running. You do 8 rounds of 20 seconds on and 10 seconds off. Go as fast/hard as you can for the 20 seconds on and do nothing for the 10 off. It helps if you have an interval watch or a partner to help with the timing. I promise, its over in 4 minutes.

Charlie
06-26-2008, 09:47 PM
and for some one that gets winded some what quick how long before they see a difference in there breathing
and you do this every day

Bill O
06-26-2008, 09:51 PM
and for some one that gets winded some what quick how long before they see a difference in there breathing
and you do this every day

I don't think that ever goes away. I breath hard after walking up a flight of stairs. That's a normal reaction.

Steve M
06-26-2008, 10:56 PM
so far I have not been doing much. I need to do something though. I'm gonna check out that link Bill posted. Maybe that will be the answer for a poor flatlander.

mary
06-26-2008, 11:25 PM
wow....you guys dont think walking does all that much for a body?....im a huge fan of walking....i walk anywhere from 3-5 miles a day and i use the stairs at a local school....later on in the evening i take my dogs out for a good run although i dont run with them i feel as though its a fair amount of activity....i wish i could run i think running is something i would really like and i am envious of people who participate in marathons....i would love to be able to say ive completed a marathon....but when i run (and i know some of you will think....oh man what a whack job) it absolutely kills my eardrums....i get a type of vibration thing going on and it causes actual pain....ive tried all different types of running.....up on the balls of my feet.....a complete foot roll....a slow run/jog....i just cant do it....i also hike a couple of times a week locally....i kayak which is great for upper body strength....i used to go faithfully to the gym and was in pretty decent shape but got out of that routine when my mom became sick as i needed to help her....ive just never gotten back to that....

mary
06-26-2008, 11:30 PM
lol....i just went back and re read your question....bill o?....hes like a mountain climbing machine!

Brad
06-27-2008, 06:53 AM
lol....i just went back and re read your question....bill o?....hes like a mountain climbing machine!
That is partly why I started this thread. There are some folks here who are in very good shape. So, sometimes their answers have to be taken with a grain of fat.

I have been pretty good recently walking around the block after work - that is a 3.1 mile loop. Doing it in 45 minutes is a steady 4 mph pace. Every other day I have been climbing stairs. From the basement to the first floor and back down is one pass. I am up to 30 of them and still going strong. That is a lot different from when I started and was totally wiped out trying to get to 10.

Patrad Fischroy
06-27-2008, 12:02 PM
Well my first disclaimer is that I am not going to be at STP, I can't justify the trip at this time. And we have such nice mountains out here as well. Anyway, I tend to hit the stairclimbing machine in the weeks before major climbs, that tends to keep my knees from cratering on me. For general stuff, I am usually found on the bike, trying to keep the strengh and endurance up. Not to mention the weight down.

Charlie
06-27-2008, 01:16 PM
so far I have not been doing much. I need to do something though. I'm gonna check out that link Bill posted. Maybe that will be the answer for a poor flatlander.

steve shouldn't training on cooking and cleaning :eek::eek::D:D:D:D

Tim&Val
06-27-2008, 04:10 PM
Just for the record, I sit at a desk from 6am to 3:30pm every workday. Yesterday, I had *seven* hours of conference calls. :D

We're just lucky to live close enough that we can train on all the other mountains. We have learned to go uphill at a consistent, comfortable pace. We don't sprint-and-break, sprint-and-break. I think that developed from being out here in the blackflies and mosquitoes. It's just better to keep moving all the time.

The downhill is still really hard for me. Tim says I'm too timid in my footfalls, and so I spend too much energy (and valuable knee strength) trying to hold myself back. I don't know how to get over that.

Regarding the breathing... I breathe hard on every hike. The way to tell if you are getting in shape is by how quickly your breathing returns to normal when you stop.

Valerie :)

Bill O
06-27-2008, 04:33 PM
Regarding the breathing... I breathe hard on every hike. The way to tell if you are getting in shape is by how quickly your breathing returns to normal when you stop.

Valerie :)

I agree, its recovery time that is a sign of fitness.

mtruman
06-27-2008, 07:29 PM
I have to say that I side with Mary on the benefits of walking. It has been the primary way that I stay in shape for some time. I've always walked on a near daily basis (a couple of miles with the dog) but decided to step it up about 18 months ago. I got involved with a program that has been run the last few years called Shape Up Rhode Island. Joined a team from work in the "pedometer steps" division and started cranking out the miles. I logged 1000 miles in the first 6 months that I was keeping track and wound up at 1700 for the year. I lost 25 pounds in the first 2-1/2 months and hit my goal of being in the best shape of my life on my 50th birthday last year. I've cut back a bit but still average over 25 miles a week and have maintained basically the same fitness level. I'm not sure that I agree with the comments about it being natural to be winded under exertion. I used to be out of breath after one or two flights of stairs but I can do 7 flights (and do this regularly at work) without being out of breath now. I also have found that this carries over to hiking - including up the mountains. I do agree with Valerie about the downhills though. My "old knees" just don't appreciate them much anymore - but I'm happy to go up all day long.

This was the long way of saying that my belief these days is in steady training all year long. We've been doing some extra hiking and getting some miles on the bikes to push it a bit more to prepare for STP but nothing else. We're going to be staying in Camden ME the second week of July and will have a chance to get in some small mountain hiking (nothing over 1000' in Camden Hills). Can't wait for July 26th!!!

KD Talbot
06-27-2008, 08:49 PM
What's that? I actually consider myself in terrible shape. I've got to side with Val that the best training for this is to be out there doing it. A "consistent, comfortable pace" as she says. We seldom do starts and stops as we find it too hard to get going again.

I think age makes a huge difference. If I were young, I would definitely go to Bill's suggested training regimen, but I think at our age, (Jude and I are 49), slow and steady wins the race, or at least completes it.

I've never been one to work out, but what I have found is the best training for hiking up hill is, that's right, hiking uphill. We are lucky to have a steep 3/4 mile hill near us at work and we climb it quite often at lunch. At least we used to. We have been lucky enough to be able to spend like every other weekend in the mountains for the last few years, so that helps. Gas prices and other obligations are putting a damper on things this year. We're planning on spending a lot more time "training " when the weather cools down a bit, late August and on. A few 80 degree humid days makes me long for winter hiking!

I also agree with Val and Bill, because I breathe heavily on "the steeps" but I recover pretty quickly. I know of some extreme hikers who do things in a day that I would take two to do. I doubt they ever get very "out of breath" but I think they are the exception, not the rule.

KDT

Charlie
06-27-2008, 09:16 PM
i am happy to hear that others have breathing heavy when hiking .

i am doing some of what bill does and trying to recover from my heavy breathing fast and trying to drop some weight .im 278 and that's a lot to move around :eek:

mtruman
06-27-2008, 10:50 PM
What's that? I actually consider myself in terrible shape.
...
I also agree with Val and Bill, because I breathe heavily on "the steeps" but I recover pretty quickly. I know of some extreme hikers who do things in a day that I would take two to do. I doubt they ever get very "out of breath" but I think they are the exception, not the rule.

KDT

Hard to believe that anyone who's done the 4Ks over 3 times is in terrible shape. I look at your TRs each weekend and imagine how sore I'd be on Monday morning (although it would be worth it). Based on the times you guys turn in for these routes I'm pretty sure I'd be out of breath on the steep sections too. Of course you have to keep pace with Emma :rolleyes:

Steve M
06-28-2008, 08:01 AM
Hard to believe that anyone who's done the 4Ks over 3 times is in terrible shape. I look at your TRs each weekend and imagine how sore I'd be on Monday morning (although it would be worth it). Based on the times you guys turn in for these routes I'm pretty sure I'd be out of breath on the steep sections too. Of course you have to keep pace with Emma :rolleyes:
I don't think I would even try to keep pace with a 15 lb.-4 legged animal like Emma. You might as well just shoot me in the head at the trailhead. I'm sure Emma does a lot of looking back to see where her "slower" hiking buddies are.:)

KD Talbot
06-28-2008, 09:04 AM
You've seen the pictures. She's always up the steep part looking down with that inquisitive look, "What's the hold up? Are you coming or what?"

KDT

Brad
06-28-2008, 10:56 AM
You've seen the pictures. She's always up the steep part looking down with that inquisitive look, "What's the hold up? Are you coming or what?"

KDT
Yes, I have seen Emma doing that too.

Acrophobe
06-28-2008, 05:56 PM
I wonder if dogs suffer from altitude sickness...


Not Emma, I suppose. :)

KD Talbot
06-28-2008, 08:44 PM
I have a wonderful book named Fourteeners/Colorado's Highest A Photo Journey by Roger Edrinn. He climbed all 54 with his dog Diente, now passed along, who was the only dog to ever climb all the Fourteeners. The photographs are just astounding. I would recommend it for anyone who loves mountains (and dogs) and it comes with a CD full of screen saver photos.

He makes no mention of the dog suffering altitude sickness, although it's a photo book and not an essay.

If anyone's interested you can get it here:

http://www.abovethetimber.com/

KDT

Acrophobe
06-28-2008, 09:39 PM
I wish my dog was still around every time I pass someone hiking with one. It would make the hikes so much more spirited. Although, Lassie was morbidly obese for a dog (in a cute way) so I'm not too sure how well she'd do....:)

And it's funny you mention Colorado fourteeners. I've been building violins and cellos as a hobby for a while now, and there a few local craft fairs I'm entering them in. The prize money should be enough for round trip airfare to Colorado Springs (it's only two hundred-ish, not that bad, really), home to Pikes Peak. I've been interested in doing something bigger then NH mountains for a while now, and this looks like it could be my chance. I was originally going to do Mount Rainer in Washington (14,411 feet), in part because because my aunt lives in the area and in part because it's so beautiful around there. Unfortunately, a good portion of it is technical ice climbing (probably out of my league) and also, you need to get a permit to climb it alone. Unlikely they'd give it to someone like me.

So, I looked at Mount Whitney (highest in the lower 48), but there's an anti-overuse lottery held in February, and I'd missed it.

Sooo, Pikes Peak. 14,110 feet, it is, and more importantly, it's summitable by a mere hiking trail - no technical skill required, only raw endurance. The Barr trail (the main trail) is twelve and a half miles long and rises 7500 feet. Apparently, the round trip is doable as a day hike, but I'd want to savor the experience and camp after summiting. Interestingly, it looks like Pikes Peak is the Colorado equivalent of our Washington - it's got a road, a cog railway, and a big summit house full of overweight tourists who didn't climb up. :)

How old is Emma, by the way?

mtruman
06-29-2008, 11:55 AM
Sooo, Pikes Peak. 14,110 feet, it is, and more importantly, it's summitable by a mere hiking trail - no technical skill required, only raw endurance. The Barr trail (the main trail) is twelve and a half miles long and rises 7500 feet. Apparently, the round trip is doable as a day hike, but I'd want to savor the experience and camp after summiting. Interestingly, it looks like Pikes Peak is the Colorado equivalent of our Washington - it's got a road, a cog railway, and a big summit house full of overweight tourists who didn't climb up. :)

Yikes - 24 miles and 7500' up and down as a day hike :eek: Makes Seek The Peak seem like a literal walk in the park. Seriously though it sounds like a great trip and a great hike - particularly with a night under the stars at 14,000' to celebrate the victory.

Acrophobe
06-29-2008, 07:57 PM
Yeah, sounds like a bit much. Here's a trail report of a couple who did it in one day. Sounds like they were really suffering at the end - and don't we all know that feeling? :) http://www.summitpost.org/trip-report/169460/barr-trail-one-day-ascent.html


And yeah, camping at 14k oughta be neat. So high oxygen deprivation might even be noticeable.


Don't suppose I could borrow Emma...? ;)

KD Talbot
06-29-2008, 09:51 PM
Emma's almost 9. You lead, she will follow, or is it the other way around? :)

KDT

Brad
06-30-2008, 06:34 AM
Emma is definitely a leader.

Acrophobe
06-30-2008, 01:39 PM
Yes, she is. You should make her a little sporty vest with "Expedition Leader" on the nametag, KD. :)

rockin rex
07-01-2008, 07:58 AM
I have never wanted to work out INSIDE in a gym so I just hike and trail run to stay in shape. Just got back from the Dacks with Baxter where we tried to do the entire great range with full packs. This will get you in shape and you won't have a choice. After having to bail due to weather we hitched a ride up to A.D.K. Loge and the next day I headed up to Marcy. My wife was coming at 1:00 to pick us both up so I decided to leave the parking lot at 8:30 and try to make Marcy and be back down by 12:30. The round trip is around 12 miles. I quickly found out I was not in the shape I thought I was. I made it as far as 1.2 from the summit but had to turn around so I could be back out in time to be picked up. These are the things that I have done to keep me in some what of shape. I guess what I am saying is you just have stay active. Being inactive is what will do you in.

Brad
07-18-2008, 07:09 AM
I have this STP count down clock running on my computer - but, it is always reminding me I do not have much time left to get in shape. Maybe I should change it to the time remaining to dinner after the hike.

kaseri
07-20-2008, 09:43 PM
I do the following training each week to keep in shape.

1) Amateur Boxer - I spar about 20 rounds per week & coach amateur boxers.
2) Cycling - I ride 20-30 miles per day on a fixed gear bicycle. (link to fixed gear info (http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html))
3) Kettlebell training 3 days per week
4) Climbing/Hiking - I hike at least one 4k summit per week.

Brad
07-21-2008, 05:42 AM
I am now leaving 3 hours early for STP to not have this guy pass me by 10AM.

Steve M
07-21-2008, 06:16 AM
I do the following training each week to keep in shape.

1) Amateur Boxer - I spar about 20 rounds per week & coach amateur boxers.
2) Cycling - I ride 20-30 miles per day on a fixed gear bicycle. (link to fixed gear info (http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html))
3) Kettlebell training 3 days per week
4) Climbing/Hiking - I hike at least one 4k summit per week.

So what do you do on your spare time?:)

Steve M
07-21-2008, 06:17 AM
I am now leaving 3 hours early for STP to not have this guy pass me by 10AM.

So your gonna start your hike at 2 am? I don't think Charlie will be joining you at that hour.

Bill O
07-21-2008, 06:46 AM
3) Kettlebell training 3 days per week


Sounds like somebody else has heard of Crossfit.

kaseri
07-21-2008, 09:39 AM
I've only recently heard of Crossfit. I've been using Kettlebells for about 8 years in my personal training. I've had my competitive boxers using Kettlebells for about 4 years. The training benefits are truly amazing.

Brad
07-21-2008, 10:47 AM
I've only recently heard of Crossfit. I've been using Kettlebells for about 8 years in my personal training. I've had my competitive boxers using Kettlebells for about 4 years. The training benefits are truly amazing.
When the kettle for dinner is ready someone rings a bell? Or are these something different?

Charlie
07-22-2008, 09:01 PM
I am now leaving 3 hours early for STP to not have this guy pass me by 10AM.


So your gonna start your hike at 2 am? I don't think Charlie will be joining you at that hour.

im all for it that way i know i will get to the top by 11am :D:D