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View Full Version : Tecumseh, Aug. 31 (Just Trish, not Alex)



TrishandAlex
09-03-2008, 09:00 AM
(I've decided to work on the "grid," doing all 48 4K Whites in each month of the year. I anticipate this will take a long, long time. First ascents will always be made with Alex).

Pictures can be found on http://trishgrid.blogspot.com/

******************

Tecumseh Trail from Tripoli Road, 6.2 miles roundtrip.

Second time doing Tecumseh. This time around, the weather was crisp and the wind was gusty. Enough to tell you that autumn is right around the corner.

I decided to try the Tecumseh Trail coming from Tripoli Road this time (instead of the ski area approach Alex and I did the first time around).

I woke early, left a note for Hugh, and got to the trailhead right after daybreak.

The trail starts off flat, and I made quick work of the smooth, easy first mile.

The path comes to a "saddle" at the 1.3-ish mark, then the grade increases to moderate.
I was huffing steadily along now, interested in whether or not I could make book time. This was my first time hiking without Alex, and I was curious about my own natural pace.

The path became ornery -- not because of grade, but because there are three knobs one must climb and descend. Nothing is steep, but psychologically I didn't feel like going up down up down up down. At the top of the first knob there is a look-out point, but I did not check it out on the ascent.

After the three knobs, the path descends into a col between the west peak and the true summit.

At this point there's only .6 miles to go, so I chugged up the remaining pitch.

At the top of this pitch, one can turn around and see some views. I snapped some pictures on the descent, which you can see below, after the summit pictures.

A short walk from the top of that pitch, and I was at the summit cairn.

I was pleased to see I had made it in just under book time. I sat, ate my breakfast, and enjoyed the very fall-like weather. The wind was gusting; at one point my proxy blew away and I had to go retrieve her from the neighboring scrub.

Limited views from the summit:

After a few Cliff Bars and some gulps of water, I began the return journey. I looked over the trees at the top of that first decent pitch. Here's the view from that spot:

I also checked out the view from the top of that first knob (third knob if you're returning).

Descent was quick and easy. I felt good.

About three quarters of a mile from the trailhead, I heard a "cough cough cough" sound. From reading the trip reports of others, I knew that could mean a bear was very close by. Looking down, I saw bear tracks in the mud at my feet.

I backed up a bit, jingled my bear bell awhile, then began to sing "Oh What a Beautiful Mornin.' " Continuing down the path slowly, I made enough noise to annoy other hikers for miles around. I kept that up for a few hundred yards. Of course, I saw no bear. I'm sure all animals cleared that side of the mountain after hearing my infernal racket.

A short time later, the hike was complete!

It was a great hike. Wonderful crisp weather, and I had the trail to myself the entire time.

Rich
09-03-2008, 09:19 AM
WOW!! That is ambitious Trish, especially with two little ones at home and homeschooling! Good luck!

Nice TR from Tecumseh!

TrishandAlex
09-03-2008, 09:50 AM
Rich,

Thanks for your comments.

My mood and outlook on life dramatically improve with exercise. I'm a much better mama and wife when I feel strong and in shape. And I really, really like to hike.

I don't anticipate finishing the grid for many years. I'll just sneak the hikes in whenever I can.

mtruman
09-04-2008, 09:55 AM
Wow - 576 4k summits! Ambitious indeed. I know what you mean about mood and outlook improving with exercise - particularly hiking. If I could spend the rest of my my days hiking in the mountains I'd be a very happy person. Good luck with your quest!

TrishandAlex
09-04-2008, 10:40 AM
Wow - 576 4k summits! Ambitious indeed. I know what you mean about mood and outlook improving with exercise - particularly hiking. If I could spend the rest of my my days hiking in the mountains I'd be a very happy person. Good luck with your quest!

Thanks, Mark. I'm in no rush to do them, I truly anticipate this taking a very, very long time. Just a good excuse to go out and hike the mountains over and over.

rockin rex
09-04-2008, 11:01 AM
First time I have heard of someone doing this. This sounds like something K.D. or Bill O would do. I guess the fastest it could be done is one year but doing all 48 in January would be a challange and if you miss just one then you would have to wait a full year to do it again. Trish good luck with this. Since you enjoy hiking as much as you do then this will be a fun thing for you and you can do it at your own pace and convience. I look forward to your trip reports and pictures. How does Alex feel about mom going with out her???

TrishandAlex
09-04-2008, 11:32 AM
How does Alex feel about mom going with out her???

Alex is okay with it as long as I don't do a peak she hasn't yet done. Which is fine by me. I like to explore the "new" summits with her.

Also, I'll be a beginner winter hiker this year, and I'll be receiving a lot of instruction. I need to make darn sure I really know what I'm doing before she accompanies me in the wintertime. Since I'm a complete novice right now, she may have to wait until she's a teenager before I feel I can really take care of her out there in the winter. We'll see how it goes. I don't mind getting myself out there (in groups or with guides for the first year at least). But of course I'm not going to put my kid out there if I don't know what the heck I'm doing myself. And right now, when it comes to winter hiking, I'm clueless. Which is why my Christmas gift from my husband will consist of money for guides and classes.

mtruman
09-04-2008, 03:41 PM
First time I have heard of someone doing this. This sounds like something K.D. or Bill O would do. I guess the fastest it could be done is one year but doing all 48 in January would be a challange and if you miss just one then you would have to wait a full year to do it again. Trish good luck with this. Since you enjoy hiking as much as you do then this will be a fun thing for you and you can do it at your own pace and convience. I look forward to your trip reports and pictures. How does Alex feel about mom going with out her???

There are a bunch of amazing approaches to doing the 4000 footers - most of them listed at the back of "4000 Footers of the White Mountains" by Steve Smith and Mike Dickerman. This is a really good book if you're a 4k peakbagger (http://www.mountwashington.org/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=282 (http://www.mountwashington.org/forums/../store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=282))

The "all the 4ks in every month of the year" is one of the extreme approaches. A few others are: All 4k peaks at midnight in winter, All in less than one week, and the one I find most amazing -
All peaks from all 4 compass directions in winter (by Guy Waterman). If you look at the approach routes on this basis it is pretty much impossible to see how this could be done.

Someday Trish will be joining the record books as well. :)

TrishandAlex
09-04-2008, 06:20 PM
There are a bunch of amazing approaches to doing the 4000 footers - most of them listed at the back of "4000 Footers of the White Mountains" by Steve Smith and Mike Dickerman. This is a really good book if you're a 4k peakbagger (http://www.mountwashington.org/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=282 (http://www.mountwashington.org/forums/../store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=282))

The "all the 4ks in every month of the year" is one of the extreme approaches. A few others are: All 4k peaks at midnight in winter, All in less than one week, and the one I find most amazing -
All peaks from all 4 compass directions in winter (by Guy Waterman). If you look at the approach routes on this basis it is pretty much impossible to see how this could be done.

Someday Trish will be joining the record books as well. :)

I'm trying to figure out some novel approach that no one has ever done. I want to definitely do all possible trails over the course of this adventure (however, I'm not into bushwacking). I'll do at least one summit trip for each mountain at night, once I'm over the heebeegeebees of being in the woods at night. Apart from that, I can't think of any other way to summit the peaks (I'm not imaginative enough). If anyone has any ideas, send them my way.

I want to enjoy the experience, though...so hiking backwards or sideways, or hopping, etc....I'll leave those approaches to others.

TrishandAlex
09-04-2008, 06:25 PM
"4000 Footers of the White Mountains" by Steve Smith and Mike Dickerman.


I read this book as much as I read the White Mountain Trail Guide (or whatever that big book is called). I didn't know there was an updated version -- the one I have is from 2001. I'll have to get the new one.

Acrophobe
09-04-2008, 07:58 PM
Sounds fun, Trish. It's getting towards that time of year when it's best to hike. Falling leaves, crisp air, no bugs, the promise of winter in the air...my favourite time of year. If I ever get hitched, I want to drag the potential Mrs. up to the Whites in early October to propose - doesn't get much more romantic then that. :)

And I've only done Tecumseh once, in January. It was absolutely lovely and possibly even doable with Alex.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v310/Geeeeeeek/100_1160.jpg

Have fun with that list - I haven't even finished the 48 once. :)

TrishandAlex
09-04-2008, 08:12 PM
Your picture is lovely! Yes, Tecumseh seems like a good starter winter hike. Tom, Field and Willey too, I'm guessing. Seems to me winter hikes can be in some ways much nicer than summer hikes. One could safely slide down many trails instead of rock-hopping. More views. Less people, perhaps. Anyway, I look forward to learning.

Brad
09-04-2008, 09:27 PM
As kids we used to see who could hike the longest without using their hands. On some trails it does get hard - and you forget.

mtruman
09-05-2008, 07:31 AM
Your picture is lovely! Yes, Tecumseh seems like a good starter winter hike. Tom, Field and Willey too, I'm guessing. Seems to me winter hikes can be in some ways much nicer than summer hikes. One could safely slide down many trails instead of rock-hopping. More views. Less people, perhaps. Anyway, I look forward to learning.

We've discovered the joy of winter hiking the last couple of years (spent Feb vacation in Crawford Notch the last 2). I don't feel quite ready for a major above treeline adventure with ice axe and crampons yet but doing some of the lower peaks on snowshoes has been incredible. I used to hate being outside in the cold but hiking in the snow is changing my mind. I agree about the easier downhill part too - much easier on the knees than rock hopping.

Acrophobe
09-05-2008, 07:42 AM
I agree about the easier downhill part too - much easier on the knees than rock hopping.

Yes indeed - I even brought a sled to a few of our hikes last winter, though I wouldn't recommend that for Alex. :)

KD Talbot
09-05-2008, 10:39 AM
It should be noted that Peter Crane, Obs director, is very humbly and quietly approaching the completion of this amazing feat.


"I'm trying to figure out some novel approach that no one has ever done."

I've been doing them naked in all seasons.


"I guess the fastest it could be done is one year but doing all 48 in January would be a challange and if you miss just one then you would have to wait a full year to do it again."

Actually, the most challenging months are in the spring when the snow is rotten and the trails are streams and mud.


"Yes indeed - I even brought a sled to a few of our hikes last winter"

Just a note: If you sled or Swiss Bob (http://www.wagondepot.com/Eurosled_Swiss_BOB_Snow_Sled_p/eur-esb.htm) off a mountain it is considered mechanical means and would not count. Skis and glissading on snowshoes is allowed.

KDT

TrishandAlex
09-05-2008, 11:07 AM
It should be noted that Peter Crane, Obs director, is very humbly and quietly approaching the completion of this amazing feat.

KDT

Go Peter!!! That's awesome!!!!! :D

mtruman
09-05-2008, 01:07 PM
I've been doing them naked in all seasons.


:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

Acrophobe
09-05-2008, 01:28 PM
I've been doing them naked in all seasons


AHHH!! MY VIRGIN EYES!!!

Well, that IS a novel approach. Not sure I'd want to tackle Washington in January in my birthday suit, though....:)



Just a note: If you sled or Swiss Bob off a mountain it is considered mechanical means and would not count. Skis and glissading on snowshoes is allowed.


Hmm. Thanks for pointing that out. I'd hate to get the list done and then realize half of them didn't count. Sure was fun, though. :)

rockin rex
09-05-2008, 03:02 PM
Now I have to say that doing the grid naked would be very difficult. I guess what ever people can thinkl of. I agree Washington in Jan. would be very difficult with no clothes.

TrishandAlex
09-05-2008, 03:04 PM
Now I have to say that doing the grid naked would be very difficult. I guess what ever people can thinkl of. I agree Washington in Jan. would be very difficult with no clothes.

Wouldn't the very first hike be aborted by a ranger at some point? Unless you did it at night, or at some time when you were sure not to be reported..?

KD Talbot
09-05-2008, 06:52 PM
I agree Washington in Jan. would be very difficult with no clothes.

Southerners. :mad:


Wouldn't the very first hike be aborted by a ranger at some point?

They haven't stopped me yet. ;)

KDT

Patrad Fischroy
09-08-2008, 08:19 AM
Southerners. :mad:



They haven't stopped me yet. ;)

KDT

This might also have the added advantage of dropping the number of people on the trails :D