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View Full Version : Crag Camp with the OBs Crew...



JimS
09-21-2008, 06:07 PM
Brian, Ryan, Natalie, Cara and a coworker of mine took off yesterday to hike Mount Adams and spend the Night at the RMC shelter on the edge of King Ravine.

The weather was perfect for the hike up, the weather dry, and the views excellent. We reached Crag Camp in a few hours, and split up from there. Brian and Cara took off for the summit, Ryan and I waited a bit and went to Adams 4 for sunset, and the two others enjoyed the sun on the porch...which as one of the best views of any structure in the whites.

Here's what Ryan and I experienced:
Peak autumn foliage on the tundra with blueberry scrub and deerhair sedge in beautful backlit color!
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3044/2876121497_386bbc638d_o.jpg


A fun night, a great dinner and a sunrise which dawned in the fog, so despite my desire to shoot over the great gulf at sunrise, I got to sleep in.

More pics perhaps to follow...

Bill O
09-21-2008, 06:47 PM
Amazing photo....stop teasing us, we want to see more. Any photos of Crag Camp itself?

If everyone from the summit took off who fed the cat?

TrishandAlex
09-21-2008, 06:49 PM
Wow. What a gorgeous picture. I would frame that and hang it on my wall in a second. Gorgeous.

Brad
09-21-2008, 07:14 PM
Jim, that is beautiful

JimS
09-21-2008, 07:29 PM
Thanks guys...Mike, Stacey, Steve and Jeff were still guarding the summit...not to worry...

BillO, I don't have any of the hut itself, but here's a shot of the view from the porch, Natalie front and center:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3131/2876520657_5b72411191.jpg

And the view from 15 feet away on the ledge of King Ravine:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3130/2876520201_cb134377c0.jpg

and..

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3254/2877351700_ee8051610a.jpg

mtruman
09-22-2008, 07:24 AM
Wow - what a beautiful fall day up there! Great shots Jim. The one of the sunset is just spectacular!!!!

Gorque
09-22-2008, 12:56 PM
I've always wondered what the view was from there and I must say, it's beautiful. I can attest to the view from below and it's nowhere near as nice, especially when you reach the headwall. :)

mtruman
09-22-2008, 01:20 PM
Any photos of Crag Camp itself?


There are some good shots of the camp on Hike the Whites: http://hikethewhites.com/crag_camp.html

Looks like a pretty awesome spot. I hadn't considered any of the RMC shelters before but after looking at these I really want to try to get up there.

billysinc
09-22-2008, 01:33 PM
Hey Jim what settings/filters did you use for the first picture?

JimS
09-22-2008, 02:10 PM
Hey Bill,

This was a tough shot to get the settings right. Even after I got it, I had to lighten up a dark band through the middle where my graduated filter rested.

Settings as followed...
Canon 20D w/Sigma 18-200 @ 24mm
1 Second @ F11
ISO 100
3 Stop Hard and 2 Stop Soft GNDs
Polarizer

Processing:
Color Temp in Raw
Slight dodging and burning the grad line
Levels adjustment for slight boost in contrast...

billysinc
09-22-2008, 03:42 PM
Thanks

I'm in the market for a new lens, either a 200 with vr or 300 without due to cost. I was curious what you shot that with even though you were only at 24mm.

Brad
09-22-2008, 07:37 PM
Having a range of 18-200mm is very nice. One lens can handle a lot of tasks.

JimS
09-22-2008, 08:13 PM
Yeah...it's a good lens, but begins to trail off in sharpness at about 125mm. It's a great lens because of it's range...but given a budget, I would own a 12-24, a 17-40, and a 70-200. I don't find it limiting, but there are better out there...

The canon 70-200mm series is about a sharp a lens made anywhere, and the f4 non IS is very affordable...

Someday...

Brad
09-22-2008, 08:33 PM
I have the

Canon 28-135mm IS
Canon 70-300mm IS
Canon 16-35mm wide angle

and like them a lot. Plus I borrow (gee, I seem to have it all the time) my son's Sigma 100-500mm lens.

billysinc
09-22-2008, 08:38 PM
I have a 50mm f1.8, and an 18-55 now I'm looking for something with some reach. I have a Nikon which is why I'm looking at the 55-200.

A 70-300 would be nice but from what I've been reading trying to shoot at the longer lengths without a tripod is very tough without VR. I can get a non-vr for about $150 but add VR and the cost goes to $550.

I can get a 55-220 with VR for $215 which is a little more tolerable for someone just getting into shooting with a DSLR from the world of point and shoots.

Brad
09-23-2008, 06:39 AM
Using a 300mm lens without stabilization is workable. I have used a 500mm with no stabilization and gotten crisp moon shots. Lean against something like a car or a tree and it works. Using the 500mm handheld for moving objects works well. I have done 1,800 pictures in a day at an air show with only the 500mm and been very pleased with the results.

If you can rent or borrow the 300mm, give it a try.

Patrad Fischroy
09-23-2008, 09:33 AM
You can also get a trekking pole with a camera mount head to give you some needed support without the bulkiness of a tripod. Plus it can come in handy for the descent.

Jim,
Have you ever tried using the software magic of HDR ( High Dynamic Range) processing? This is a technique where you get a number of images at bracketed settings and basically take the best parts of each image and blend them together. A simple explanation, I know. Here is a primer on it for those interested

http://www.naturescapes.net/072006/rh0706_1.htm

Some feel that it is "cheating" but it really is no worse than any other manipulation. There are some great examples of it out there ( and some that are in my opinion less so).

KD Talbot
09-23-2008, 08:28 PM
Thanks for the link, P! Will check out this tutorial much further.

KDT

Brad
09-23-2008, 09:36 PM
As I posted on another thread, I use treking poles from REI that double as monopods

http://www.rei.com/product/745686

JimS
09-24-2008, 06:12 AM
Thanks for the links on HDR. I've yet to embrace the technology for a few reasons...

The main reason I do photography is to connect with nature and to capture the scene in front of me as closely as I am seeing it. I therefore use filters, and find great satisfaction in getting the shot right in one shot. My RAW files look very much like my edited photographs, and it's alot of what gives me joy in the field.

Additionally, I have seen a few to many cooked HDRs where the local contrast is gone, causing a very computery look to the scene, which causes me a disconnect with the landscape that was origionally captured.

That being said, the software is getting better, and it will continue to do so. The shots posted in your link look natural and beautiful.

Something I have done to maximize the dynamic range in a picture is to double process the raw images, one for the sky, one for the foreground, and manually bring those together via a mask. Quick, easy, and retains all the character and contrast of the scene, without making a computer tell me what the scene looked like.

Thanks again for the link...
Jim

Patrad Fischroy
09-24-2008, 09:18 AM
I agree with you on the "overcooked" images that are out there, however even they do occasionally have some merit as an artistic representation, sometimes giving an otherworldly feel.

For the purpose of accurate representation, or in other words a "worship of the natural word", HDR can also have a place. It effectively does what you describe with the masks and two exposures, but with some intermediate steps as well. The point made about HDR that I like the most is the intent to represent a wider dynamic range of tones, more akin to what the eye can discern, using sensors (the camera) and media (the paper) that do not have the range.

In short it is a tool that can be used (competently or incompetently) to produce images. And it is only a tool.

mtruman
09-24-2008, 09:47 AM
Y
Jim,
Have you ever tried using the software magic of HDR ( High Dynamic Range) processing? This is a technique where you get a number of images at bracketed settings and basically take the best parts of each image and blend them together. A simple explanation, I know. Here is a primer on it for those interested

http://www.naturescapes.net/072006/rh0706_1.htm

Some feel that it is "cheating" but it really is no worse than any other manipulation. There are some great examples of it out there ( and some that are in my opinion less so).

Here's another HDR utility: http://www.mediachance.com/hdri/index.html I've used some of the other utilities from these guys and they tend to be quite good. Haven't gotten around to trying this one. It's only about $50 and there's a free trial so it's probably worth giving a shot if you want to experiment with HDR...

Patrad Fischroy
09-26-2008, 02:54 PM
Amazing photo....stop teasing us, we want to see more. Any photos of Crag Camp itself?

If everyone from the summit took off who fed the cat?

The observer comments have a little blub on this trip with some pictures of the camp inside and out.

Greg in RI
09-26-2008, 10:59 PM
WOW!!

Nice pix. My favorite time of year in the Whites. I have spent many a night at the camp in September. I'm jealous!! I can remember some amazing sunsets and a few sunrises with undercast. Great spot. Need I say more?

Thanks,

Greg

rockin rex
10-14-2008, 04:12 PM
Jim amazing pictures from the porch. Nothing beats a night at Crag Camp. In 2007 Seek The Peak my son and I spent the night at Crag camp. The night at Crag Camp is a memory we will hold between us for life. Those who haven't been to Crag Camp you have to check it out.