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M_Six
12-05-2008, 11:09 PM
Wow, 48 summits every month?:eek:

My legs ache just thinking about that.

KD Talbot
12-06-2008, 02:31 PM
Try this link:

http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/articles/2008/12/06/grid_hikers_take_on_48_40000_ft_mountains/

More about it here:

http://www.48x12.com/

KDT

M_Six
12-06-2008, 09:35 PM
Ugh, I can't believe I messed that up. Typed in the text instead of the URL. D'oh!! :o

Thanks for covering for me, KD.

Steve M
12-07-2008, 07:48 AM
Great article. It gives me something to look forward to when I retire.:)

TrishandAlex
12-07-2008, 07:54 AM
I'm doing the grid! Of course, it will take me many, many years to finish, since I've only done two of the mountains twice at this point. :p

KD Talbot
12-07-2008, 09:59 AM
I've been at it for 10 years, but I never really thought about the grid. I'm well into my 4th round of the 4ks, though I haven't officially finished my 3rd. Have to go back to Owl's Head for that and I'm waiting for calendar winter to do that one. Now, I may have close to 4 rounds, but I've hiked the same mountain in the same month a lot of times, so it doesn't help me towards the grid.

I swore off lists a while back, then got caught up in the winter 4k list. :mad:

Finishing a list sets you free. Free to hike for the pure enjoyment of being out there and absorbing the nature. I go to the mountains because it cleanses me. A purification, if you will. The mountains are my church, hiking is my religion.

Hiking simply to complete a list takes the fun out of it for me. I was stuck on the 4k list for a couple of years, then when I finished it I got to visit a lot of other smaller mountains I would not have considered climbing before. Then I realized I loved just being out there, that lists and numbers took away from the experience. In retrospect I wish I had never known there was a list to complete.

KDT

mtruman
12-07-2008, 01:04 PM
I've been at it for 10 years, but I never really thought about the grid. I'm well into my 4th round of the 4ks, though I haven't officially finished my 3rd. Have to go back to Owl's Head for that and I'm waiting for calendar winter to do that one. Now, I may have close to 4 rounds, but I've hiked the same mountain in the same month a lot of times, so it doesn't help me towards the grid.

I swore off lists a while back, then got caught up in the winter 4k list. :mad:

Finishing a list sets you free. Free to hike for the pure enjoyment of being out there and absorbing the nature. I go to the mountains because it cleanses me. A purification, if you will. The mountains are my church, hiking is my religion.

Hiking simply to complete a list takes the fun out of it for me. I was stuck on the 4k list for a couple of years, then when I finished it I got to visit a lot of other smaller mountains I would not have considered climbing before. Then I realized I loved just being out there, that lists and numbers took away from the experience. In retrospect I wish I had never known there was a list to complete.

KDT

Sounds like words of wisdom. When we got hooked on hiking a few years ago I immediately started thinking about the lists. For me there always has to be a goal. When we did our first trip in the Presidentials two summers ago I was initially really excited about how many 4Ks we were going to be able to knock off in a week. When we got up there my entire attitude changed. The day we were going from Madison to Lakes we skipped several of the summits (including Washington - which would have been my first time on top) because it was such an awesome day and the summits didn't seem important in and of themselves. I've never regretted the decision. I hope I'll finish all 48 some day and go back to the top of many including Washington many more times - but not because of the list, because they are such incredible places to be. I've enjoyed everything about every mountian that I've been lucky enough to be on since that day - no matter what the height. Can't wait for the next one...

TrishandAlex
12-07-2008, 02:57 PM
I understand what you guys are saying, but I enjoy lists because it gives me the extra motivation to get out there and see everything. I feel I'd enjoy doing the 4Ks over and over because I would fully appreciate the change of the seasons on the same trails. Doing other lists will probably bring me to mountains I woudn't think about otherwise. In addition, I enjoy the "game" aspect, and the distance and elevation are getting my body into shape.

That being said, I will also enjoy smaller hikes, with Alex (and hopefully Sage), where we don't go that far and can therefore take forever looking at everything we want to see. We'll probably do a lot of that kind of thing this winter, when harsh conditions will often keep us at a lower elevation.

KD Talbot
12-08-2008, 03:53 PM
Sorry, I guess I sound like I'm knocking lists, and I really don't mean too. After all, the 4k list is what got me started. I just don't want to be tied to a list if I can help it, but that's just me. Everyone should hike their own hike.

Here's some more:

http://home.earthlink.net/~ellozy/ne-hundred-highest.html

http://www.nhmountainhiking.com/hike/lists/nh100.html

http://www.nhmountainhiking.com/hike/lists/nh3000.html

http://www.adk46r.org/

http://adirondack100highest.com/default.aspx

http://www.peakbagger.com/list.aspx?lid=21408

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_England_Fifty_Finest

http://www.peakbagger.com/list.aspx?lid=41407

http://www.franklinsites.com/hikephotos/nhossipee10.php

http://www.belknapsportsmensclub.com/check_off_list.htm

http://www.firelookout.org/towers/nh/nh.htm

http://www.cohp.org/vt/vermont.html

http://www.peakbagging.com/Peak%20Lists/MEco2.html

Well, I think I covered New England and New York, at least.

KDT

mtruman
12-08-2008, 04:45 PM
Sorry, I guess I sound like I'm knocking lists, and I really don't mean too. After all, the 4k list is what got me started. I just don't want to be tied to a list if I can help it, but that's just me. Everyone should hike their own hike.

Here's some more:

...

Well, I think I covered New England and New York, at least.

KDT

And is there a name for the "list of lists" that you just presented Kevin? The "Everything That's Climbable in the Northeast" list perhaps? Is it possible to do this list in a kilt (or - <gasp> - even less)? :)

TrishandAlex
12-08-2008, 07:55 PM
KDT, no need to apologize -- I can see the silly side of "the grid," definitely. The more I think about it, the more ridiculous it seems....however, I still want to do it, I still think the idea is fun. And I can laugh at myself as I say I want to do it, because I know I have an OCD type personality and probably most who want to do the grid ALSO have some kind of OCD personality...:D.

Patrad Fischroy
12-09-2008, 12:27 PM
It is funny, but lists just never seemed to be important to me. Here in Colorado, I have climbed a few peaks with a friend that has got the "centennial list", top 100, completed as well as almost all of the the top two hundred. Me, I only tag along when he is doing a high 13'ner. I like those because they are right up there and do pose a challenge, but since they are not 14'ners, they don't have anywhere near the traffic on them. I guess I have put the 14'ners on a sort of "anti list". But then that is still a list of sorts.

Bill O
12-09-2008, 12:54 PM
Aren't there over 1,200 13'ers in CO? Some of them still don't have names.

Patrad Fischroy
12-09-2008, 12:59 PM
Oh yeah, and if I don't get them all, so what? The fun is just getting out there.

Bill O
12-09-2008, 01:47 PM
You're right though, 13'ers in CO are virtually empty. In the minds of most people out there they might as well be 10 feet tall when compared to a 14'er.

On my list anything over 4,000m is considered high altitude....which includes 13'ers.

mtruman
12-29-2008, 04:21 PM
I finally got around to reading both the article and the 48x12.com website this weekend (yes, I'm a bit behind in my reading). While I had initially thought that the grid was an amazing (or insane depending on how you look at it) feat I had no idea how much crazier it could get.

The primary guy that the Globe article was about (Ed Hawkins) was the second person to complete the grid (there are only 8 official completions). He didn't do his first hike (of any kind) until he was 46 years old. Did his first 4K at 47 and this was the start of his first grid. He is now 62 and not only has he done the complete grid TWICE, he has completed almost 3100 NE 4K peaks as of this November. :eek: My brain can't even process this. He has done all of the NH 4Ks every year for the last 12 years (and obviously a lot more as well) and he's done them all 50 times!!! Somehow he's also found time to do 43 US highpoints and 45 Colorado 14ers and God knows what else. You have to read his accomplishment list to believe it (or not): http://www.48x12.com/edhawkins.shtml

The rest of these guys are equally amazing. While I don't ever aspire to anything approaching this (or any list at all as discussed it the rest of this thread) I would sure like to have the time and dedication that these people have to spend in the mountains.

Pete S
12-30-2008, 08:15 AM
"On April 1, 2007, Ed completed the New England 67 in every calendar month by summiting Hamlin Peak & Baxter. He was the first and currently only person to do this. He was accompanied by Dave Langley, Lars Janson, & Gloria Verrill."

I crossed paths with Mr. Hawkins and group on the last days of March in Baxter in both 2006 and 2007--- we were skiing out, and they were snowshoeing in.

An April summit of Baxter and Hamlin is an epic journey. Remeber,no overnight camping is allowed in Baxter after March 31. So, after awakening at Chimney Pond on April 1, they climb Baxter and Hamlin, descend to Chimney, get their overnight gear, then have about another 15 miles to go ( down to Roaring Brook and out the Tote Road to the cars at Abol bridge)---

Pete

krummholz
12-30-2008, 04:51 PM
Gerry Roach's book "Colorado's Thirteeners" lists 637 peaks in CO from 13,001 on up (through the 14ers and up to Mt. Elbert). But those are the ones that meet his requirement of having a 300+ foot rise from any col with a neighboring peak. There are a lot more with less of a rise. The book only goes into detail on route descriptions for peaks above 13,800. There's an awful lot of great mountainous terrain that does get largely overlooked. The Colorado Mountain Club books go into more detail for the lower peaks. Personally, I've barely scratched the surface with a couple of 13ers around Breckenridge.

Patrad Fischroy
12-30-2008, 07:57 PM
Another book by Roach

http://www.amazon.com/Colorados-Thirteeners-13800-13999-FT/dp/1555914195/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1230684187&sr=8-1

Lists 34 peaks from 138000 on up to 13999.

I have been trying to do these as an informal (anti)list of sorts. I like his style of guide book.

krummholz
12-31-2008, 10:07 AM
Yes, Gerry Roach has a great style for a guidebook! I've read his books so many times that certain of his phrases stick in my brain, like "The introduction is over" and "Consider your future"---both phrases he uses to describe a point along a route when you are soon going to be facing much more difficult terrain, and you might want to think carefully about what you are about to embark on.

TrishandAlex
12-31-2008, 10:44 AM
Yes, Gerry Roach has a great style for a guidebook! I've read his books so many times that certain of his phrases stick in my brain, like "The introduction is over" and "Consider your future"---both phrases he uses to describe a point along a route when you are soon going to be facing much more difficult terrain, and you might want to think carefully about what you are about to embark on.

Those two phrases are wonderful! Am now going to incorporate those into my hiking lingo (giving credit to Roach, of course).

TrishandAlex
12-31-2008, 10:48 AM
The primary guy that the Globe article was about (Ed Hawkins) was the second person to complete the grid (there are only 8 official completions). He didn't do his first hike (of any kind) until he was 46 years old. Did his first 4K at 47 and this was the start of his first grid. He is now 62 and not only has he done the complete grid TWICE, he has completed almost 3100 NE 4K peaks as of this November. :eek: My brain can't even process this. He has done all of the NH 4Ks every year for the last 12 years (and obviously a lot more as well) and he's done them all 50 times!!! Somehow he's also found time to do 43 US highpoints and 45 Colorado 14ers and God knows what else. You have to read his accomplishment list to believe it (or not): http://www.48x12.com/edhawkins.shtml



Yes, Ed Hawkins in quite an inspiration. I've never met him, but I hope to someday. I hope to one day be able to do what he's doing, perhaps when both girls have left for college (I'll have major empty nest syndrome, I'll need something to take my mind off their absence anyway).

I love that he didn't even start hiking until his late 40s. I love that hiking is something anyone of any age can do. Gives me hope that I can get into and stay in premium physical shape, even into my 40s and 50s and 60s and 70s and beyond (I'm 38 now).

mtruman
12-31-2008, 11:36 AM
Yes, Ed Hawkins in quite an inspiration. I've never met him, but I hope to someday. I hope to one day be able to do what he's doing, perhaps when both girls have left for college (I'll have major empty nest syndrome, I'll need something to take my mind off their absence anyway).

I love that he didn't even start hiking until his late 40s. I love that hiking is something anyone of any age can do. Gives me hope that I can get into and stay in premium physical shape, even into my 40s and 50s and 60s and 70s and beyond (I'm 38 now).

Yes, it is encouraging that there are as many serious hikers as there are out there in their 50s, 60s, 70s and beyond. If my knees and other sometimes creaky and painful joints don't get much worse than they are now in my 50s I'll hopefully be among them. I didn't start hiking until about the age that Ed did. He got a bit of a jump on me however and did more in his first year or two than I may do in the rest of my life (which is OK). The good part is that the more I hike (and even just walk) the better those achy joints seem to feel. Hope that's always the case...