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forestgnome
12-17-2008, 07:45 PM
This big guy dropped his antlers recently. I try not to cut off body parts in pictures, but it's hard to focus and compose on a moving animal in the dark. I saw him and his mate (probably) in the Sandwich Range on Sunday.

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l190/forestgnome/decyards083.jpg



http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l190/forestgnome/decyards082.jpg

happy trails :)

CHRIS
12-17-2008, 08:50 PM
Great pics. Patrick. Thank You for sharing.

Charlie
12-17-2008, 08:53 PM
nice once again

Steve M
12-17-2008, 10:59 PM
Very nice. What time of night was it? It looks like it was pitch black.

KathyC
12-18-2008, 04:13 AM
Ok, dumb question from a city girl...

Isn't it really dangerous to hike in the woods at night?

forestgnome
12-18-2008, 05:55 AM
Thanks, all. I was hiking off-trail higher up in the mountains and I was on my way out, maybe a half mile from the Kancamagus when I saw them. It was about 5:00pm.

Here's his mate...again, it's hard to focus under such conditions.

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l190/forestgnome/decyards025.jpg

happy trails :)

Brad
12-18-2008, 06:03 AM
Getting the focus right on the camera would be the least of my worries. Being safe would be one I would have on the list. They are known to charge when they see a human. Maybe ForestGnome is not human after all.

TrishandAlex
12-18-2008, 11:37 AM
It is common knowledge that forestgnome is a moose who has learnt how to type. Either that, or he dons his invisible cloak before venturing out to take his (consistently gorgeous) pictures. :D

Mike D
12-18-2008, 12:42 PM
Bah! The great thing about New England is that nothing in the woods will sting, poison, or eat you... without provocation.


Ok, dumb question from a city girl...

Isn't it really dangerous to hike in the woods at night?

Steve M
12-18-2008, 02:22 PM
Bah! The great thing about New England is that nothing in the woods will sting, poison, or eat you... without provocation.

Try that theory in Florida!:D

mtruman
12-18-2008, 03:39 PM
Bah! The great thing about New England is that nothing in the woods will sting, poison, or eat you... without provocation.

However in the case of a moose it isn't sting, poison or eat that you have to worry about (and provocation isn't necessarily needed).

Charlie
12-18-2008, 07:41 PM
Try that theory in Florida!:D

you mean like swimming in a swamp :eek::eek:

Charlie
12-18-2008, 07:44 PM
Patrick do you come across there antlers a lot when your out there ,i would love to have some to make some things like lamps and other things .

i may have to just go north a little more and hike around :D

Brad
12-18-2008, 09:48 PM
Being that I know of people who were killed by a moose, I am wary.

KathyC
12-19-2008, 04:22 AM
Has anyone ever run into bears? I think that I'd be more afraid of bears, but I'd probably be afraid of a porky pine too...

forestgnome
12-19-2008, 05:54 AM
Patrick do you come across there antlers a lot when your out there ,i would love to have some to make some things like lamps and other things .

i may have to just go north a little more and hike around :D

It's a needle in a haystack situation, but I enjoy being out there and I look specifically for areas where moose spend time in winter, when they are dropping antlers. So I do find antlers. I leave most of them and just photograph them, but I occasionally keep them. Some say they are neccesary food for rodents but I'm certain that is not the case because I often find them years old but only slightly nibbled, or not at all.

This one is a year old...

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l190/forestgnome/mooseyard044.jpg



This a matching pair and they are quite fresh. This is very difficult to find. Look closely and you'll see punture holes in the middle of the palm. These are battle wounds from another bulls antlers during the rut.

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l190/forestgnome/nov.jpg



happy trails :)


BTW, you can buy them on EBay...not cheap:eek: