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View Full Version : Cresent Moon, Jupiter and Mercury at sunset



forestgnome
12-29-2008, 07:17 PM
This was taken just after sunset tonight. I'm not sure if focus was slightly off or if the gusty wind shook the tripod a bit.

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l190/forestgnome/092copy1800.jpg


The moon will be out tomorrow and Wednesday at sunset. On Wednesday it will join Venus for a nice conjunction. Get out there and shoot!

Steve M
12-30-2008, 12:47 AM
That might not be safe. I will have to consult Javier on that one.

CHRIS
12-30-2008, 07:08 AM
Wonderful picture. Thank you.

mtruman
12-30-2008, 09:10 AM
What a beautiful shot. The color transitions are amazing!

BlueDog
12-30-2008, 02:48 PM
That might not be safe. I will have to consult Javier on that one.

OK... THAT made me laugh!

M_Six
12-31-2008, 08:50 PM
I tried my (very cold) hand at some sky photography tonight. I learned some lessons.

1. I need to know my camera better. With little light available, it was tough fumbling around with the controls.

2. It's impossible to set your camera with gloves and after a few minutes with temps in the teens, it's impossible to set your camera without gloves.

3. I need a taller, steadier tripod.

4. The camera really needs to acclimate. Avoids steamy lenses and mirrors.

Nonetheless, here are a couple. In one you can see a plane's lights. It was a 3 second exposure, so you can see where the lights flashed a few times as it was passing.

http://bimmermail.com/moon02.jpg

http://bimmermail.com/moon01.jpg

Brad
01-01-2009, 10:38 AM
I tried my (very cold) hand at some sky photography tonight. I learned some lessons.

1. I need to know my camera better. With little light available, it was tough fumbling around with the controls.

2. It's impossible to set your camera with gloves and after a few minutes with temps in the teens, it's impossible to set your camera without gloves.

3. I need a taller, steadier tripod.

4. The camera really needs to acclimate. Avoids steamy lenses and mirrors.

Nonetheless, here are a couple. In one you can see a plane's lights. It was a 3 second exposure, so you can see where the lights flashed a few times as it was passing.

Mark,

Nice pictures. I keep a small pencil like mag-lite in my camera pack to see things when it is dark. When on Bulb and the camera is counting the seconds that display only shows up on the top control panel. So, the flashlight is needed. It is small enough to be able to shield it from the lens.

I also keep a very thin knit pair of gloves in my camera pack just to give some protection. They help but you still get cold and you can operate the camera with them on.

The main tripod I use is a Sunpac 7575 which is very solid. Many tripods come with a hook underneath between the legs. If you have a bungie cord or a strap, you can hang something there to hold things down if the wind is strong.

The only problem I have had is the lens freezing up and not focusing in extreme cold. Move them by hand a bit and they were fine. Everyone says to let the camera and lens acclimate and you will have less trouble.

Taking pictures at night is a very different challenge. Your shots came out well. If you got the shutter speed up to at least 1/100th or 1/160th of a second you would get more clarity of the moon. When it is not a full moon it is hard to get enough light. But, it is fun to try.

Here was my attempt at the moon last month - with a 6 second exposure.

http://images45.fotki.com/v1422/photos/8/8235/6917527/CRW_9066-vi.jpg

faegilr
01-01-2009, 09:09 PM
Also, you could put a film of red over the flashlight, that way, you would retain your night vision.

Steve M
01-02-2009, 12:54 AM
Is that an airplane I see in the second pic?

forestgnome
01-02-2009, 06:44 AM
It's a great first try! And Brad, really nice image there!

A few more tips:

*I use a headlamp ($15.00 Energizer) It has a red led light option. No hands needed and it doesn't hurt your night vision.

*Try fingless fleece gloves inside a winter mitt. Since I only use my thumb and index finger on my right hand, I customized a pair of gloves with sizzors. I just wip out my hand, work dials, then shove it back into the mit for recovery.

*I use a cable release, which I put right into the mitt. If not, use the timer to avoid having your hand on the camera to avoid shake.

*I keep a weightless plastic supermarket bag in the pack. It can be hung from the tripod hook, mentioned by Brad, and filled with a rock, etc.

*Practice doing the whole operation in your home at night(lights out), from set-up to shooting a streetlight, or even the moon, through a window.

*My Canon rebels both give an inacurate look on the viewscreen concerning lightness. The pic is always quite darker then it shows on the viewscreen.

*For white balance, it seems like AWB works best until the sky is midnight blue, then Tungsten seems to be more true. Try different WBs.

clear skies :)

h2oeco
01-02-2009, 07:13 AM
Brad,

Re: cable release, timer, etc., I don't know what Canon you use, but I learned a while back that Nikon makes a $20 wireless remote release for my camera (D-80). Works well, and requires no contact with the camera or tripod, and once things are set up, no cold hands. Perhaps Canon makes something similar for your camera, or maybe a 3rd party does.

Ed

Bill O
01-02-2009, 07:47 AM
That might not be safe. I will have to consult Javier on that one.

He'll let us know a few weeks after the fact. When everything works out in his favor.

Brad
01-02-2009, 11:42 AM
The cable release is a must for any night time pictures. Pretty much if I use the tripod, I use the cable release. Any shake will show up.

I like the headlamp idea with the red lens setting. I would have to change hats though as it would not work well with my Australian hat.

The supermarket plastic bag is a great answer for doing the tripod weights. I had not thought of that solution - but I will start using it. A water bottle or a rock could easily be used for the weight.

Steve M
01-02-2009, 06:02 PM
The cable release is a must for any night time pictures. Pretty much if I use the tripod, I use the cable release. Any shake will show up.

I like the headlamp idea with the red lens setting. I would have to change hats though as it would not work well with my Australian hat.

The supermarket plastic bag is a great answer for doing the tripod weights. I had not thought of that solution - but I will start using it. A water bottle or a rock could easily be used for the weight.

I have found the same thing trying to take night time photos'. I am going to look into a remote for my camera.

KD Talbot
01-02-2009, 09:48 PM
You don't really need a remote or a cable release. Just use the timer. Press the shutter and by the time it counts down to ten there will be no jitter.


Is that an airplane I see in the second pic?

Steve

In one you can see a plane's lights. It was a 3 second exposure, so you can see where the lights flashed a few times as it was passing.

M_six

Steve, you've really got to stop reading at 2am. : )
KDT

Brad
01-03-2009, 04:49 PM
I have used the timer - but find the cable release far better. When trying to take the same picture with 3 different settings the extra time to wait for the timer can mess it up - a bit.

Steve M
01-04-2009, 01:36 AM
It's amazing to me even as steady as I think I am I find I can't be still enough.