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pipesmoke
01-07-2009, 10:12 PM
Rumor has it the gas stove is being considered for replacement and we, for two, would like to encourage the powers to be to save it. It has it's idiosyncrasies but does a nice job. It seems the big issue is lighting and with a little practice that goes well. For all you cooks out there that agree with us jump in and offer your views. Thanks Charlie and Jeanine

Bill O
01-08-2009, 07:31 AM
Sorry, I vote against saving the current stove. It is inefficient and does a poor job cooking. Try cooking a turkey when the flame constantly gets blown out from the wind. With new volunteers coming every week it doesn't make sense for them to spend half the time learning how that dinosaur works.

Perhaps, more important than nostalgia is making the observers and guests happy. Burnt cookies lead to unhappy observers. Unhappy observers leads to high turnover and high turnover leads to bad observers. Burnt cookies also leads to unhappy guests. Unhappy guests don't return to the summit.

The observatory should do everything it can to make the summit a more modern, comfortable and efficient place to live. Not to mention, the new stove is also going to be 100% gas. It has to be, electricity is too expensive on the summit.

Rich
01-08-2009, 09:03 AM
Burnt cookies lead to unhappy observers. Unhappy observers leads to high turnover and high turnover leads to bad observers. Burnt cookies also leads to unhappy guests. Unhappy guests don't return to the summit.

I love turnovers. But, not burnt.

pipesmoke
01-08-2009, 11:15 AM
After 7 years and numerous trips without a burnt turnover I say keep the Stove. Nothing to do with nostalgia, it is more stove than it will be replaced with.

Bill O
01-08-2009, 11:33 AM
There's nothing like having the wind blow out the flame and filling the living quarters with propane. Which won't happen with a modern stove with electronic ignition. No fire department can come to the summit in the winter so anything that improves their safety is important.

I heard the new stove would be a modern six burner with all the features of its predecessor...and more. I'm not sure what you'd be giving up with a modern stove.

BlueDog
01-08-2009, 11:40 AM
Though I haven't volunteered on the summit, I'm not an observer, but I have indulged in a cookie or two during Seek the Peak.

I'm on the side of Bill O here, and mainly, if those that use it every day, the observers, think its time for a new one, then I'd say give them the tools they need to make their lives easier and more comfortable.

The issue has been posted and discussed in the past on this forum. As I see that you've just joined us yesterday.... first, welcome! Second, how about an introduction? Sounds like you may have first hand experience with the stove in question? Just seems like kind of an oddball issue to join the forum and jump in on with your first post, that's all. :)

Bill O
01-08-2009, 12:05 PM
....and mainly, if those that use it every day, the observers, think its time for a new one, then I'd say give them the tools they need to make their lives easier and more comfortable.


Good point, the summit is their home for over half the year. I'm all for anything that makes their lives more comfortable. A volunteer is just there for a week, its a working vacation for them.

RI Swamp Yankee
01-08-2009, 12:23 PM
Maybe it should be saved ...... in the museum. Having read a bit about the unique features of the current stove perhaps it could be used as a carnival type fundraiser. For $2 a try, light the stove in under a minute WITHOUT 2nd degree burns and win a prize. :eek:

Bill O
01-08-2009, 12:42 PM
That thing would be great in the museum. Or it could fetch a premium price on the antiques market. People would be amazed at how the observers lived way back in 2008.

I heard that stove actually used to be just a four-burner, but it had so much caked on grease they were able to add two more.

Another good carnival game would be "guess the temperature." Just turn the knob and guess what temperature it is inside the oven.

pipesmoke
01-08-2009, 01:11 PM
I surrender. I enjoy these trips too much. Never played politics well.

KD Talbot
01-08-2009, 06:43 PM
Charlie, I remember you and Jean. I used to bring my truck to you when I lived in Hampstead. We met again at a volunteer cook out a year or two ago. Jean remembered my (ex) wife.

For the curious: Charlie hiked the AT from Springer Mountain to Katahdin when he retired. He and his wife are regular volunteers.

You give in too easy. I have been all for keeping the old stove. I hate change. I don't adapt well.

Note: None of the previous posters has done much cooking on it if any, except maybe Bill, who probably mostly cooked for himself, though he may have eaten a lot of burnt cookies.

I never had a problem with it. In fact, I liked to cook on it. It had character. Like me. It is quite functional as long as you have a clue.

KDT

JimS
01-08-2009, 07:25 PM
Charlie and Jeanine:

First off, hi to some of the finer of the many fine volunteers that the summit has in their consistently excellent arsenal. Hope all is well with you!

I think you'll find many a split emotion among staff and volunteers...many love the old stove...any have turned out some fine meals on it!

Not me though ;)

Bill O
01-08-2009, 08:09 PM
I'm just in the fan club, I don't have any real say in this matter. Its up to the staff with possibly some insightful tips from the volunteers who do most of the cooking.

Steve M
01-08-2009, 10:34 PM
I'm with Bill also. I have experienced the stove and if you are a serious cook or chef who wants their food to be beyond expectation then the last thing you want is a stove that won't perform. Many volunteers go up wanting to treat the observers to special meals and it is frustrating to have to battle with the stove and play the guessing game on the oven temperature.

I say either auction it off to the highest bidder or put it in the museum (right next to the exhibit where Nin goes flying by the window). :D

Charlie
01-09-2009, 06:31 PM
Many volunteers go up wanting to treat the observers to special meals and it is frustrating to have to battle with the stove and play the guessing game on the oven temperature.


well said steve if and when i go up to cook i would want a stove that will work well so the food i cook comes out the right way with out checking on it all the time

RI Swamp Yankee
01-10-2009, 09:01 PM
There was a thread in July about the stove:
http://www.mountwashington.org/forums/showthread.php?t=3945

This post seemed relevent:


My arm hairs have grown back in! :eek:

which was in reply to this one:


.. The burners must be lit with matches or a long lighter and timing is the key to not losing your eyebrows, though I had no issues with this, I could see it as a possible problem......

timechime
02-06-2009, 08:49 AM
Haven't been on the forums for awhile....saw that the stove issue has come back to the fore on its own.

I spent a week volunteering and I remember keeping hungry observers waiting for their dinner as it cooked at half speed. I never got it quite right with the timing and tended to work the range top more so I could have control over the heat. I did lose the flame on several occasions and used up at least one box of matches sticking my hand into a gas filled box. I was never sure if I'd have any hair on my arms after each attempt!

I had gone so far as to research a range for the summit but lost contact with those in charge of the ultimate decision. I'm still on board to help.

After reading this thread, I'm thinking perhaps the old stove SHOULD be put on display. Maybe they can use it in the visitors center. :eek::D

Brad
02-06-2009, 07:54 PM
My wife is a serious cook and today we were talking about trying to get her to volunteer for a week some summer. The "we" did not include my wife as we were in the snowcat on the way to the summit. If she heard about the stove's condition, I can not imagine she would go. Cooking well means too much and not having reasonable equipment just does not cut it. It does not have to be excellent - but it should work.

h2oeco
02-06-2009, 10:20 PM
I've now spent three volunteer weeks at the summit, and have had no trouble with the stove/oven (though the hood fan did freeze solid at one point) - by way of example, back in November, I made roast leg of lamb, a cake, pizza, etc., and plenty of other things, all without a hitch...

A new stove would be nice, but I suspect that there are other priorities these days...

Ed

KD Talbot
02-07-2009, 11:14 AM
I'm with Ed. Never really had an issue with the stove. Anew stove would be fine, but I don't see an issue with the old one.

KDT

MsCntry
02-07-2009, 05:36 PM
Well for the time being they are stuck with what they have, at least until the snow melts!!:D