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Water
02-22-2009, 05:00 PM
Hey everyone!
I am looking to get into hiking this summer of 09' and eventually hit up Mt. Washington to the summit. I am very excited.

I have climbed several mountains in Massachusetts, New Hampshire areas but they were only day trips. They all took between 45 min - 2-3 hours, so nothing too serious.

I am in great shape, train everyday and look forward to the challenge.

Ideally, I would like to start on some smaller mountains in New England area, spend the night in woods, camp out..etc

Once I began doing this, I will keep logs, pictures..etc of my journey's

UncleFester
02-22-2009, 07:31 PM
Sounds Awesome, I'm in a similar boat...I've done a few small day hikes but my goal is something more serious like you mentioned.

Happy Trails

ColdWeatherClimber
02-22-2009, 08:34 PM
Lots of talent here. You might try the SEARCH function for threads about climbing or mountaineering, and if you need further assistance don't be afraid to ask around.
:)

BlueDog
02-22-2009, 08:53 PM
Hmmm... might I suggest a July hike of Mount Washington (http://www.seekthepeak.org)?! :D

Before 2 years ago I had never done much hiking at all, and hadn't been camping for over 25 years. My first REAL hike, and first ever summit was MW back in July 07 for this great hike many of us do annually. You'll meet lots of great people, and have plenty of company if you like while on the trail.

Its not camping in the woods, but there are a good number of us that invade a local campground and make a multi-day event out of it.

But I'll give you a warning... there's a spirit of this mountain that will haunt you! After the first time you hike up through the ravine, climb over the rock fields and up the cone to stand on top, it'll stay with you and you won't be able to get it out of your head!

FisherCat
02-22-2009, 09:47 PM
But I'll give you a warning... there's a spirit of this mountain that will haunt you! After the first time you hike up through the ravine, climb over the rock fields and up the cone to stand on top, it'll stay with you and you won't be able to get it out of your head!


Its definitely a spirit, but not a haunt, its a freedom! And it will stay with you and take you over. Embrace it.

Brad
02-23-2009, 06:37 AM
I have taken many people to the summit of MW in the summer over the years. All said they were in great shape. One was a High School Senior who ended up more like a real senior - had to take the Cog down. The danger signal I missed going up was he was not talking enough about how he was doing and he was struggling more than he wanted to let on. I should have asked and probed more.

Another couple ran 5-8 miles a day on a regular basis - so, they said they were in shape. They did fine but they kept on being amazed at how much harder the climb was than they expected. It was the hardest thing they had ever done. And they said that for them the daily runs was not enough to be in shape for MW.

Others I knew would not make it to the summit or even close. So, we got as far as they could go - enjoyed the day and turned around. They loved it!

The best way of getting into hiking in the Whites is to hike. Start off small and work your way up. You don't always have to summit. You can come back for that later if you want to. MW for most people is a 4+ hour event of climbing irregular stairs - non-stop. It could be 6 hours going up. And some of the steps move when you do not expect it. But be ready to be grabbed by the beauty and power of the mountains - and the weather you find yourself in. You will keep on coming back.

I hike a bit in the NC mountains and it is nothing like being in the Whites. Have lots of fun and be safe.

Water
02-23-2009, 03:09 PM
cool! thanks for info

When i train normally, I always sprint uphill, I try to drain both cardiovascular systems as well as muscular endurance. I am enticing my gf to join me on these ventures

Bill O
02-23-2009, 05:59 PM
I try to drain both cardiovascular systems...

Both cardiovascular systems?

Patrad Fischroy
02-24-2009, 08:13 AM
Both cardiovascular systems?

He's got a lot of heart(s)???:confused:

Brad
02-24-2009, 08:22 AM
I try to drain both cardiovascular systems as well as muscular endurance.
He might have said "I try to drain both my cardiovascular system as well as muscular endurance" and been a little more accurate. But, we know what he meant. Just a slip of the "s".

I will just make sure I wave as he races up ahead of everyone else. I will stick to my "Charlie pace".

Water
02-24-2009, 01:37 PM
Both cardiovascular systems?

lol my mistake... to clarify

I try to drain both the aerobic and anaerobic systems when I train in order to get both benefits to increase my cardiovascular systeM!

not just endurance, not just sprinting.

Water
02-24-2009, 01:38 PM
He might have said "I try to drain both my cardiovascular system as well as muscular endurance" and been a little more accurate. But, we know what he meant. Just a slip of the "s".

I will just make sure I wave as he races up ahead of everyone else. I will stick to my "Charlie pace".

I don't plan on rushing at all. I just meant, I train hard otherwise so I look forward to the challenge. that's all. I want to take my time and enjoy it for sure

Steve M
02-24-2009, 07:09 PM
I'm a small guy, 5'6" and 140 lbs. My strength to weight ratio is high meaning I'm strong for my size and weight. I get away with not training very hard but I wouldn't recommend this to anyone. I would imagine the bigger you are the harder it could be on you. Last year I started walking 3 miles a day and doing bleachers about a month before I headed up there and did well. The key for me is I pace myself early. I found the pace where I was breathing hard but not letting my heart race. I knew where my body was comfortable an was able to keep it there for the entire hike up. Drinking lots of water and eating energy bars, trail mix, and snacking all the way up helps a lot also.

corey.mcentyre
02-24-2009, 09:15 PM
My technique is to go with someone who seems to know everyone we bump into on the trail and insists on photographing them. That way, I get plenty of rest stops. ;-p

mtruman
02-24-2009, 10:44 PM
My technique is to go with someone who seems to know everyone we bump into on the trail and insists on photographing them. That way, I get plenty of rest stops. ;-p

It doesn't hurt that he's made it to the top 50 times or so and knows the route pretty well too :rolleyes:

BlueDog
02-25-2009, 09:07 AM
It doesn't hurt that he's made it to the top 50 times or so and knows the route pretty well too :rolleyes:

You're talking about Emma, right?! :D

Brad
02-25-2009, 10:01 AM
You're talking about Emma, right?! :D
I would love to hike with Emma - but I know I could not keep up with her.

MelNino
02-25-2009, 10:11 AM
Meh, I'm a rather slow hiker (in pace, people, not mentality :D ) which can be annoying if I'm with people who think they need to puch the group (including leaving them behind and not taking rests)

So, I'm working out more so I can make my May hike in a good pace, and gonna get a few lil' peaks in before then. Hopefully I'll be able to do Bear this weekend, wx and work permitting.

ColdWeatherClimber
02-27-2009, 04:46 PM
What I do is lead every time. I go slow, but methodically, and steadily. My best friend is fast paced, so I make him follow me. haha

Stets
02-28-2009, 01:16 PM
The best way of getting into hiking in the Whites is to hike. Start off small and work your way up. You don't always have to summit.


This is simple but sound advice.

I have known many superior athletes, including marathon runners, that got beat up both mentally and physically attempting to climb Mount Washington.

One of the most important things I have learned about hiking is the balance aspect. You always seem to have one foot on a high rock and another foot below on a tangled root. This idea of having one leg much higher than the other on various terrain is very difficult for many people.

The other thing I have learned though hiking is that most of it is in your head.

There are so many things to overcome:

vertical feet
length of hike
weather
who you are with
weight of your pack
enough water
terrain
how you feel

These things I have picked up from my Dad, who is 83 and still climbing.

The balance of a hiker and what they are thinking during the hike are crucial to a pleasant experience.

Good luck and see you on the trail!

Brad
02-28-2009, 05:02 PM
Stets,

What you described is "tough on the knees" going up. You are going up irregular stairs for 4 hours. Some steps are very small vertical rise. Others are 2 feet or more. Some are just toe holds or less. Some move. So there is tension throughout your body in a different sort of way.

Coming down slams the hips - and knees - and legs - and other unheard from before parts of your body. The two directions are very different. Up is lifting and aerobic. Down needs to be a smooth flow instead of individual steps.