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Gorque
07-01-2009, 08:24 AM
For the past month in Connect&Cut, save for a few days, we've been experiencing continual overcast and greater than normal rain. I had read an article some years back describing how the strength or weakness of the polar system could have a marked effect upon the weather in the northern tier of the U.S., with the stronger system pulling the boundary north and vice-versa for a weak one.

Is anyone of the above correct in general and is it also responsible for what has been occurring in Connect&Cut?

Brad
07-01-2009, 10:02 AM
I was thinking this morning we need to spend money to make Global Warming happen faster. I am tired of wearing a fleece around all the time.

Gorque
07-01-2009, 11:27 AM
I don't mid the temps in the 70's during the day and high 50's to low 60's at night, in fact I like it in that range. All this weather is putting a severe dent in my outdoor plans, whether it be outdoor projects or outdoor fun. The dang rocks on the trail have become down-right dangerous with all the growth on them do to the moisture.

mtruman
07-01-2009, 04:41 PM
I was thinking this morning we need to spend money to make Global Warming happen faster. I am tired of wearing a fleece around all the time.

Gee, I'm surprised. I figured you'd be looking for any excuse to wear your fleece :rolleyes:

Bill O
07-01-2009, 06:20 PM
I think we had 22 days with rain in June and mostly cloudy skies everyday.

We're basically stuck in a spring pattern. The jet stream is still generally to our south and a Hudson Bay low has been parked over Ontario spinning off waves of low pressure every other day. Typically this time of year a strong Bermuda High is beginning to form, forcing the jet stream north bringing more stable and warm weather.

If you're interested do a search for "the year without a summer", which I believe was in 1816. Who knows if this year will shape up to be the same.

Knapper
07-01-2009, 06:50 PM
I am not exactly sure what is being asked about this polar system, it is a bit more complex than that. Around the world there are semi-permanant highs and lows which are dominant large scale weather patterns known as long wave troughs and peaks. Some of these you might be familiar with are (for highs): Siberian High, Pacific High, Bermuda High, Azores High, and the Antarctic High (and for lows) Aleutian Low and the Icelandic Low. These areas of high/low pressure build and weaken and based on their strengths, steer storms and jet streams. Sometimes these features create a blocking pattern that persists leaving some parts of the world/country in a pattern for prolonged periods of times. Currently, New England has a few things against it (or for it if you want the rain); a blocking high over Europe, a weak Bermuda High, a strong Hudson Bay trough and a weaking of the jet stream. This large scale systems allows shortwave (or weather makers) to move around them to produce areas of dry weather with the highs and wet weather with the lows. This pattern that we are in is not the uncommon and is actually sort of anticipated in the weather community. The three months that are consistant are January (the January thaw), June (June gloom), and September (usually what causes indian summers). But how soon we forget. Last summer, although a bit warmer at times, was actually wetter in most places, including the summit. Our precipitation last year was 1.64 inches above normal where as this year for June, we were only 0.91 inches above normal (with normal being 8.36"). Just hang in there, as history has shown, better weather is ahead.

Gorque
07-01-2009, 06:59 PM
Thank you both for taking the time to reply with insightful answers. You've answer my question. :)

Bill O
07-02-2009, 09:59 PM
No changes in the upper level pattern for at least the next week. Upper level low is parked over southern Ontario/Quebec

mtruman
07-02-2009, 10:22 PM
If you're interested do a search for "the year without a summer", which I believe was in 1816. Who knows if this year will shape up to be the same.

I think this may be a bad omen. Right after reading this post last night I went back to the book I'm currently reading - Tying Down the Wind by Eric Pinder (great book). About 5 pages from where I picked up I came to his account of 1816 - "the Year without a Summer". May have been a bit worse than what we are experiencing since the other name was apparently "Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death". Let's hope we're not seeing history repeating itself...