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Painan
01-18-2012, 08:52 PM
Hi all, I have a few questions about layering in general, I have a few things that I have found and want to see if they are appropriate for hiking Mount Washington during the winter season.

Clothing:
Base layer: Polyester underarmour (Top/bottom)
Over-base layer (TOP + BOTTOM): EMS Techwick T3 [http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11005934&cp=3712723.3716509.10980146.3903228] and Techwick T2 [http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11122222&cp=3707807.11302151.11315569]
Insulation layer (TOP): I have a fleece vest
(Uninsulated) waterproof and breathable shell (TOP + BOTTOM): EMS SYSTEM III (pants): [http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=4358841] -- not sure about a top maybe Marmot Minimalist? [http://marmot.com/products/minimalist_jacket]
Hooded down or Prima-loft jacket: Prima-loft Ascent [http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/66223?pi=1013321&qs=3012739_g_shopping&subrnd=0] or something else... not too sure about this.

Those are my items I'm looking at getting, what do you guys think about them? Have any suggestions for anything else or if these items are completely wrong?

Thanks.

Bill O
01-19-2012, 07:35 PM
It sounds about right. Generally, I don't like underarmour brand anything. It's a personal opinion, but its for football players. EMS, REI, Patagonia and other outdoor companies all have their brand of lightweight long underwear, I'd recommend those over underarmour.

Your legs are going to be cold too. You need a base layer, an insulating layer and a shell at the least.

bikehikeskifish
01-19-2012, 09:32 PM
Your legs are going to be cold too. You need a base layer, an insulating layer and a shell at the least.
As a counterpoint, I rarely wear more than one layer on my legs. I tend to run hot. Getting sweaty is a no-no. Your mileage may vary. Mount Washington is probably not the best choice for your first winter peak (not clear if it is / will be.) Pierce is an excellent choice. Exposed enough for you to feel the fury, but treeline is < 10 minutes away.

When I do need extra on my legs, I double duty a pair of Pearl Izumi tights, and/or my Swix XC ski warm-up pants.

Tim

Bill O
01-19-2012, 09:40 PM
What you wear and what you carry are not the same thing. I agree, my legs are rarely cold too, but if you get lost and need to spend the night in the snow I'd prefer to keep my legs.

Brad
01-20-2012, 10:08 AM
When I went shopping at REI in NC for these types of things the sales clerk helped me a lot. As we were were heading to the register I asked if these would really keep me warm when it was very cold - he asked, "How cold do you expect to be out in?" When I said -45F wind chill he grabbed all the REI stuff and said "wrong aisle". And we headed to their Patagonia section. I have been very happy with those selections.

Snow Miser
01-20-2012, 04:22 PM
he asked, "How cold do you expect to be out in?" When I said -45F wind chill he grabbed all the REI stuff and said "wrong aisle". And we headed to their Patagonia section.

Good thing you mentioned that at the last moment!

Charlie
01-20-2012, 07:19 PM
i like shorts when im in the cold

1339

Snow Miser
01-20-2012, 09:46 PM
OMG Charlie. Great photo!

KathyC
01-22-2012, 07:46 AM
I'm sorry to ask this question, but my curiousity has the best of me...

When you are out there and wearing all of those layers and clothes nature calls must be rough.
Ok, men have it a bit easier, but it must be tough for the girls.

Maybe I'm the only one that thinks of these things, but I had to ask... :o

billysinc
01-23-2012, 08:40 AM
Gore-Tex Depends

sdways01
01-23-2012, 09:06 AM
I'm sorry to ask this question, but my curiousity has the best of me...

When you are out there and wearing all of those layers and clothes nature calls must be rough.
Ok, men have it a bit easier, but it must be tough for the girls.

Maybe I'm the only one that thinks of these things, but I had to ask... :o

I don't know if they have anything similar in hiking gear, but I know all the women in our snowmobiling group have drop seat riding pants/bibs that make those tasks much easier.

KathyC
01-23-2012, 07:18 PM
Thank you for answering, that is good to know. :)

averagejoe
01-27-2012, 10:43 AM
My buddy asked a fellow, while on Rainer, "what was the hardest part of climbing Everest" to which he replied "trying to pee through six inches of insulation with a three inch unit".

On the serious side now.

As for bottoms, I typically wear a pair of Marmot ski pants as my outer layer. I have to say, a pair of full side zip shell pants would be convenient for potty breaks, but more important, I put my boots on at the base after I put on my shell pants. Who would want to take their boots off to put on shell pants when it gets too cold and windy to hike without them? A full side zip pant would make it much quicker and easier. Under the shell I often wear a single mid or heavy weight baselayer. Yesterday I wore both and my wool hiking pants because I expected to be standing still at belays a few times. I could have done fine with the lightweight and wool pants, but luckily my pants breath well and are vented
My upper body always seems colder than my legs do, until I get moving for ten or so minutes. I typically wear a midweight and a heavyweight baselayer. On top of that I wear a softshell. I bring a micro-puffy jacket for stopping. I also have a waterproof windproof breathable jacket for windy conditions.
I check the weather before I leave the house and dress for what I think it will be like as far as layers go so I can be quicker at the base. Just the same, I bring a small duffle of other weight stuff and reassess when I get there.


Yesterday, me and two buddys went up to climb in Huntingtons and ski down from the hut in Tuckermans. I was down to my baselayers, no hat or gloves within ten minutes of the trail head. Granted I was carrying a full ski set-up in addition to climbing gear and regular winter hiking gear, whick was a workout, but if I didn't have my skis we would have been almost twice as fast, and I would have been pretty warm below treeline anyway. Yesterday was a little weird for Washington at the end of January. At the top of the climb on top of Huntingtons completely exposed, it was calm, almost dead calm and probably twenty degrees. I didn't put on my jacket for ten or so minutes while I cooled down.

Joe.

Disclaimer: averagejoe works for REI. averagejoe does not speak for REI or represent REI's point of view.

smithtim
02-13-2012, 09:19 PM
^ what you described above just hit in on the most important advice one can give:

listen to your body; if you're hot take of a layer or if your shivering put on a layer... everybody's different and you have to figure yourself out and listen to what your body is telling you

so many people get locked into ideas like "its less than 20 degrees so I need x number of layers" and that just doesn't work



BTW Joe how was the ice looking in those gullies?

averagejoe
02-25-2012, 10:10 AM
Yeah you know, not as many people hike in the winter because for a newbie it's a P.I.T.A.

First off there is a whole slew of gear you have to own or some you may be able rent. When you are on the trail and don't have the experience to know how to dress yourself, you can carry extra layers, or wear what you have on and maybe freeze your ass off. Though you're more likely to overdress and sweat. You then think, oh these layers wick so I'm fine, only to get cold when you stop to break cause you're drenched and don't have a layer for that purpose. Not that I ever did that.

The ice was "good" all things considered. We only went up Central Gully cause there was a slow moving party on Pinnacle. If you have a Facebook account check the pics.

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.3192145804804.163578.1300664335&type=3&l=47937abb1a

Joe.