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Thread: Autumn's First Sunrise...

  1. #11
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    We tried a neural density (or was it a polarizing) filter on the North View cam to darken the sky. I'm sure you've noticed that it gets washed out during bright sky conditions. We are probably going to juggle around our cameras instead, installing some very high quality, high res cameras in our best spots and move the others to less optimal locations once we roll those out (hint for the future).

    [Edit: that's "neutral" density... the neural ones have a hallucinogenic effect... still in R&D. ]

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimS
    I spent the night at Mispah last night, and hiked up to Mt. Pierce for both a sunset and a sunrise. I thought it a unique opportunity to catch the last sunset of summer, and the first sunrise of autumn.

    The tundra is in it's full autumn coat, and I had great light to hightlight it...
    2 questions Jim: can you post the full-size version and give me those pictures of Torin!!!

  3. #13
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    For the camera buffs here is the EXIF information on this picture. Jim, you should really upgrade your Adobe Elements 2.0 to 5.0. It is a lot better version.

    Exif Sub IFD

    * Exposure Time (1 / Shutter Speed) = 4/10 second = 0.40000 second
    * Lens F-Number/F-Stop = 13/1 = F13.00
    * Exposure Program = manual control (1)
    * ISO Speed Ratings = 200
    * Exif Version = 0221
    * Original Date/Time = 2007:09:23 05:47:58
    * Digitization Date/Time = 2007:09:23 05:47:58
    * Shutter Speed Value (APEX) = 86634/65536
    Shutter Speed (Exposure Time) = 1/2.50 second
    * Aperture Value (APEX) = 485024/65536
    Aperture = F13.00
    * Exposure Bias (EV) = 0/2 = 0.00
    * Flash = Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
    * Focal Length = 24/1 mm = 24.00 mm
    * FlashPix Version = 0100
    * Colour Space = sRGB (1)
    * Image Width = 720 pixels
    * Image Height = 480 pixels
    * Focal Plane X-Resolution = 3504000/885 = 3959.32
    * Focal Plane Y-Resolution = 2336000/590 = 3959.32
    * Focal Plane X/Y-Resolution Unit = inch (2)
    * Custom Rendered = normal process (0)
    * Exposure Mode = manual exposure (1)
    * White Balance = auto (0)
    * Scene Capture Type = standard (0)
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
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  4. #14
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    All,

    In addition to the exif Info, I used a 4 stops of gnd filters (2 two stop filters) and a polarizer filter.

    Brad...
    I just got a new computer and am saving up for Photoshop CS3...I can't justify the price of elements in the mean time...

    Mike,
    I just got a new computer, and will finally be able to get my pictures in one place and find the Torin shots soon!
    "I've learned that everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but that all the happiness and growth occurs while you're climbing it."
    ~Andy Rooney

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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike D
    We tried a neural density (or was it a polarizing) filter on the North View cam to darken the sky. I'm sure you've noticed that it gets washed out during bright sky conditions. We are probably going to juggle around our cameras instead, installing some very high quality, high res cameras in our best spots and move the others to less optimal locations once we roll those out (hint for the future).

    [Edit: that's "neutral" density... the neural ones have a hallucinogenic effect... still in R&D. ]

    Mike, A straight Neutral density filter, one without graduation, will just slow the camera down, and make it work harder for the right exposure. They do sell round, screw on GND filters, that might work...or new high quality cameras could work as well!
    "I've learned that everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but that all the happiness and growth occurs while you're climbing it."
    ~Andy Rooney

    Follow my photography on Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/pages/Jim-Sa...y/156147782386

  6. #16
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    That's great stuff Jim, thank you very much. I've been using a Nikon N80 for years and am making the switch to digital. On my N80 I did make frequent use of a ND filter and found it quite good. Sunrise and sunset provide such great colors, yet they can be the hardest to capture, and they do provide such soft, vibrant light. As I make the conversion to digital I will definitely keep your excellent points in mind>
    Thanks!

  7. #17
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    There is another method that could be used, albeit via "photoshopping". It can be done in a couple of ways. The technique is called high dynamic range or HDR. It can be done in photoshop or another program by the name of photomatrix. Basically you take 3 exposures, bracketing the "correct" exposure. generally -2, 0, and +2 stops. Then combine the three exposures into one photo via the software. The different exposures allow the camera sensors to grab different parts of the image within their best range of response. You can "cheat" abit by taking a "raw" image from the camera and "expose" it in the same 3 steps to give a similar effect.

    One result of using this over the graduated filter is that in the casr of Jim's shot, he could avoid the darkness of the top of Eisenhower..

    Please let me be clear, I am in no way trying to criticize that shot, it continues to take my breath away whenever, I look at it. I just wanted to let some of you all have another tool in the chest.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrad Fischroy
    There is another method that could be used, albeit via "photoshopping". It can be done in a couple of ways. The technique is called high dynamic range or HDR. It can be done in photoshop or another program by the name of photomatrix.
    I just installed Photoshop CS 2 on my old laptop and was wondering what kind of memory does it take to run the HDR process?

    There's nothing wrong with photoshopping. If Ansel Adams had Photoshop, he would have used it. They did it all the time back in the dark room through burning, dodging, and many other physical touch-ups.
    Bill
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrad Fischroy
    There is another method that could be used, albeit via "photoshopping". It can be done in a couple of ways. The technique is called high dynamic range or HDR. It can be done in photoshop or another program by the name of photomatrix. Basically you take 3 exposures, bracketing the "correct" exposure. generally -2, 0, and +2 stops. Then combine the three exposures into one photo via the software. The different exposures allow the camera sensors to grab different parts of the image within their best range of response. You can "cheat" abit by taking a "raw" image from the camera and "expose" it in the same 3 steps to give a similar effect.

    One result of using this over the graduated filter is that in the casr of Jim's shot, he could avoid the darkness of the top of Eisenhower..

    Please let me be clear, I am in no way trying to criticize that shot, it continues to take my breath away whenever, I look at it. I just wanted to let some of you all have another tool in the chest.

    Dark Eisenhower is certainly not taken as a criticism, and honestly I apprecaite any thoughts that you may have. I, for instance, don't really like the upper right corner...

    As for HDR...It is a tool, but I hate it. It seems to render everything a midtone, makes for unnatural skies, and things always move. Yes, I have seen some done well, but for someone trying to render a scene as close to natural as possible, I'll stay away from this technology...
    "I've learned that everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but that all the happiness and growth occurs while you're climbing it."
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    Follow my photography on Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/pages/Jim-Sa...y/156147782386

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimS
    As for HDR...It is a tool, but I hate it. It seems to render everything a midtone, makes for unnatural skies, and things always move. Yes, I have seen some done well, but for someone trying to render a scene as close to natural as possible, I'll stay away from this technology...
    I guess I haven't seen too many HDR shots. The ones I have seen do have an un-natural look. But, just for arguments sake. Isn't HDR much more realistic in terms of what the human eye can see? What's the range of light that the human eye can see as compared to a digital camera or B&W film?
    Bill
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