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Thread: What's in your pack

  1. #11
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    Couldn't that just be from statistics? Because the expert is out there 5 days a week vs the novice who goes maybe once a month?

    Kirk

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    I was just reading that people considered to be experts in their field are far more likely to die than novices. For example, experts in avalanche safety/awareness are far more likely to be killed by an avalanche than someone traveling into the backcountry who knows nothing about avalanches.

  2. #12
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    Did you catch the Survivorman behind the scenes episode? He scouts the area days before shooting and hangs out with local survival experts for the terrain he's in, to learn what's edible as well as hazards and dangers. Makes sense, but from watching the show you'd think he just parachutes into the back country and walks out a few days later.

    He also always carries a sat phone in case it gets bad. I don't blame him, I'm all for surviving off the land, but it is the 21st century.

    It's all interesting stuff, but I couldn't build a rabbit snare to save my life, that's why I pack powerbars

    Kirk

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    Don't laugh, by from watching Suvivorman and Man VS Wild the most essential tool they carry is a knife or large multi-tool. It seems to be the only item that always goes with them on their adventures. And except for the clothes on their back needed to prevent flash freezing that is all they need. Everything else just adds another increment of luxury in a survival situation.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by spyboy
    Did you catch the Survivorman behind the scenes episode? He scouts the area days before shooting and hangs out with local survival experts for the terrain he's in, to learn what's edible as well as hazards and dangers. Makes sense, but from watching the show you'd think he just parachutes into the back country and walks out a few days later.

    He also always carries a sat phone in case it gets bad. I don't blame him, I'm all for surviving off the land, but it is the 21st century.

    It's all interesting stuff, but I couldn't build a rabbit snare to save my life, that's why I pack powerbars

    Kirk
    Just watched that one. Its to be expected that he researches the area beforehand. He needs to know what to eat and what not to eat. I have a feeling the sat phone is for insurance purposes. Man VS Wild is much worse. They have pre-arranged scenarios and the camera crew has helped him in several locations.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  4. #14
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    Default when will people/hikers learn

    This topic comes up again and again on this and other forums and yet search and rescue/ fish and game has to go out and save these people. What is needed in your pack is what will get you safely from point A to point B. Weather should ALWAYS be checked before starting out and you take along the clothes that you will need for the weather you will be facing. If you are going above tree then pack an extra fleece and throw some thin liners in and a light beanie for the head just in case. The point has been well made here many times. Always if going above tree plan that you might have to spend the night outside due to an emergency. I have seen too many people in cotton shirts, sneakers and no pack above tree and if they were to get a sprained ankle or broken leg they would be in trouble. HIKE SMART and be around for another hike.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by spyboy
    Couldn't that just be from statistics? Because the expert is out there 5 days a week vs the novice who goes maybe once a month?

    Kirk
    If done properly they should correct for this, but I doubt they did.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  6. #16
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    I've heard numerous times from safety training (for work) as well as in an outdoor wilderness survival class I took a few years ago that a disaster is a chain of events.

    Break the chain and the disaster is avoided. If you read up on any big events (like the guy from CNET who died last year in Oregon) usually early on, something was done (or not done) that started the escalation. But many times along the series of events, another bad choice was usually made. At each point, if proper actions were taken, the disaster would have been avoided.

    I think a key action a lot of people ignore is to turn around and head back to the car if something happens along their hike (provided it's easier to get back there than go to one of the huts)

    I remember hiking Camel's Hump in Vermont, and on my return back to the parking lot, a woman with 3 kids stopped me and asked if I had any food, her son was hungry. What?!?!?! They looked like they had just parked the car and decided a hike would be a fun thing to do. I had a bag of carrots and handed it to the kid, who took 1 piece, I said take a handful and put them in your pockets. The mother says "don't you have any candy or anything?" Yeah, like I'm a vending machine...

    They were in jeans and light sweatshirts, and were in for a surprise at the top, because there was about 1/2 inch of snow.

  7. #17
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    I usually pack more than the people I hike with, water bottles, emergency gear, warm weather gear, wet weather gear, food, knife, headlamp, cell phone, compass, camera. When I start training (I am not in the best shape, and have to get ready a few months before I tackle kmwn, ha) I usally carry my full pack on the nice little trails around here...I get funny looks from the people just carring a water bottle, but its worth it!

    Then again, I'm a girl, I'm used to caring around a bunch of stuff in my purse (though not too many girls carrying around their pocket knife, waterproof matches, and a few caribiners...)

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