Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30

Thread: Volunteering

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    542
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Whether there's one or two, they're all "volunteers" in the sense that they are expected to pitch in.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,145
    Thanks
    541
    Thanked 121 Times in 73 Posts

    Default

    how come they do not have the application on line to e mail it in
    i am a Summit Club member
    http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/new pictures and videos

    If your not a OBS member yet then what are you waiting for

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,679
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 32 Times in 28 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hawk
    how come they do not have the application on line to e mail it in
    You have to print and mail it in. Not sure why. Probably cuts down on junk submissions and weeds out those who aren't really interested.

    Volunteering on the summit is considered quite an honor and there is a long waiting list. Even so, I encourage you to sign up and get on the waiting list. Volunteers occasionally cancel and they need replacements on short notice.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,145
    Thanks
    541
    Thanked 121 Times in 73 Posts

    Default

    thanks i will get i right out
    i am a Summit Club member
    http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/new pictures and videos

    If your not a OBS member yet then what are you waiting for

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oneco, CT
    Posts
    94
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts

    Default

    I can't imagine that volunteering at the summit would NOT be an incredible experience for anyone. It was a wonderful experience for me!
    Everyone who was working there - bar none - WANTED to work there - WANTED to be there - and KNEW the place they were working in was unique. The atmosphere is simply charged with excitement and interest - no matter whether there are other visitors to the summit - hikers, car tourists, cog travelers - or whether you are alone with the summit staff. The place is simply fascinating and fun.
    No one is allowed to camp above treeline - because of the fragile environment, but while working at the summit you can wander out at midnight, onto the deck, and see the most incredible display of stars you may ever see. You can sneak out very early in the morning and catch a sunrise that you will NEVER forget - you and the vast surroundings - alone.
    Between the meal preparations you are allowed free-time to hike some of the many trails along the Presidential ridge or simply relax in a setting you are unlikely to duplicate anywhere else.
    If you are interested in the workings of the observatory, itself, you will have no better chance to witness this in great detail. Hands on learning is encouraged and you are more than welcome to pitch in and help - no matter what the chore.
    Yes, you need to know how to cook - and plan meals. And, hopefully, know how to use your leftovers well, to eliminate waste. That's a biggie on the summit where waste, solid AND liquid, is tracked closely. And yes, your other major responsibility is keeping the living quarters clean. A small price to pay for the privilege of being there.
    The kitchen is rather small and you can be expected to serve as many as 15-18 people, if you have a group up there (we had one group when I was there). But that group of 15-18 is like sitting down to eat with your family. You feel immediately close to all of them and they to you. We laughed, to the point of tears, at some of the stories shared around the dining room table.
    We helped to run some new wires around the summit building - learned how to read the wind charts - met people from Alaska, North Carolina, Japan, and nearby Jackson, New Hampshire - gazed out with visibilities over 100 miles - and experienced wind-blown fog at 60 miles an hour. Where else could you do all of that in one weeks time?
    To say that my time there was incredible and unforgettable is a HUGE understatement.
    I've been hiking in the White Mountains for 37 years (and hiked Mt. Washington at least 10 times) - and yet this was something NEW - another DIFFERENT perspective of that beautiful mountain. One that can be had no other way.
    So, my advice to anyone thinking about volunteering is this: DO IT!! You will NEVER regret your decision.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,145
    Thanks
    541
    Thanked 121 Times in 73 Posts

    Default

    which do you do more winter or summer

    and how does it work with what week you go ,can you pick a couple of weeks that i can go .will they help work around it .there are about 3 different weeks over the summer i cant go.

    thanks for your help
    i am a Summit Club member
    http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/new pictures and videos

    If your not a OBS member yet then what are you waiting for

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oneco, CT
    Posts
    94
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts

    Default

    I've only had the pleasure of volunteering in the summer. You are required to work a summer shift before applying for the winter. It's kind of a "shake-down" to make sure you don't go stir-crazy and that the personalities blend - at a time that, if it doesn't work out for some reason, you have options of leaving (in the winter there is only ONE trip up the mountain per week - and no one else goes up or down).
    As to the summer, I'm sure it's not the easiest thing to schedule some volunteer in for each and every week of the year, so I'm willing to bet they will do their absolute best to accommodate your specific weeks if at all possible. If your schedule is very tight with no exceptions, it might take a year or two to get in there.
    Still, no matter what - or how long it takes - it's MORE THAN WORTH IT!!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    222
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    My application is on its way!! Some of you have wrote in that you have to cook, which is no problem, but did you have help or are you alone? Do you plan the meals, bring your own recipes, or do they plan that for you?

    I make Killer cookies! Got milk?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    542
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bretton Woods Brat
    My application is on its way!! Some of you have wrote in that you have to cook, which is no problem, but did you have help or are you alone? Do you plan the meals, bring your own recipes, or do they plan that for you?

    I make Killer cookies! Got milk?
    The core of the volunteer's job is to cook dinner. You are alone unless you bring someone with you; and there are many volunteers who volunteer in pairs. Some bring their spouses (spice?), siblings or friends.

    There are two fridges, two freezers, and a pantry full of food, largely frozen meats and vegetables. Flour, sugar, spices, and other basic recipe components are there. However, if you want anything exotic and fresh (such as seafood) you have two choices: request that the volunteer coordinator put it on the shopping list, or bring it yourself.

    The crew are accustomed to eating meals ranging from extremely basic (like spaghetti and meatballs) to advanced gourmet (like Hawaiian pizza, kidding), with most meals falling somewhere in between. You don't have to be a culinary whiz, but you have to be able to hold your own. The menu is chosen by consensus between the staff and volunteer(s). Be sure to know about any trips you will be cooking for, as they usually require breakfast, lunch, dinner, and often desserts and snacks. When you cook for the crew only, dinner is all you do.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,247
    Thanks
    112
    Thanked 398 Times in 250 Posts

    Default

    From today's comments it sounds like we have 2 volunteers up doing major work on the conference room. What a great contribution! The pictures were nice to see. A picture of a "cold saw" was nice - but we could have had one of a "cold chisel" and given new meaning to the word.

    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet Personal photo web site
    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •