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Thread: Sodium Acetate Heat Packs?

  1. #1
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    Default Sodium Acetate Heat Packs?

    Have anyone tried sodium acetate heat packs? They are clear until you click a metal thingie (yeah, that's technical) inside the bag and then it reacts, crystallizing the sodium acetate and giving off heat (130 degrees F).

    I was curious how long the heat lasts before recharging (boiling the bag in water until it turns clear again).

    Are they worth getting? I was thinking this could be a nice addition to my emergency kit.

    Kirk

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    Bought these because they were on sale and a buddy of mine had the same brand. You can usually find good deals online though on them as well. I bought them because they are reusable which would save me in the long run. But I have mixed feelings on them. If you follow the instructions to a point, then they work great. Meaning if you snap the plate to activate them in an indoor setting then stick them in a well insulated area, they stay warm for an hour or so. But the thing is, you have to keep kneeding them to keep the cyrstals active. If not, it seems to cool in like 10 minutes. If you have some large gloves where these can slip into the palms of your hands between the inner and outer layers and squeeze them that way, I have got them to work for three hours for the snow cat ride up in -10F at the top with cooling along the way. Also, if you store them somewhere where they are not insulated, I have had them crystalize without being activated due to temperature (ie, the trunk of my car). Bottom line, if you want instant long term heat that is reliable, use the charcoal type. If you want short term, instant and reusable heat, try the sodium type. But I guess what would be key here is to find someone that has em so you can try them before you buy them. But even after you try them, the outdoors classes I have taken advises that you keep the charcoal type in your emergency kit not these and to make sure you renew the charcoal type every two years to ensure they will work.

  3. #3
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    Thank you for the info. I knew (as always) I'd get an informative answer on these forums

    Kirk

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    Knapper clearly has more practical experience with these heat packs than I do. When I was a kid, I was fascinated by the heat crystals that spread out from the metal clicker. The one-off heat packs are not nearly as interesting.

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    I have 3 of the "really cool" ones. So, I will have to experiment this winter with them a bit. I got them at a log home show to use when waterskiing in the winter.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
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    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad
    I have 3 of the "really cool" ones. So, I will have to experiment this winter with them a bit. I got them at a log home show to use when waterskiing in the winter.
    This is called "cross country skiing".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike D
    This is called "cross country skiing".
    ... on the lake. If you are pulled by a snowmobile over the frozen lake, does it count as waterskiing?
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet Personal photo web site
    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad
    ... on the lake. If you are pulled by a snowmobile over the frozen lake, does it count as waterskiing?
    Technically speaking that would be iceskiing.
    Steve
    Is there really any BAD weather???

  9. #9
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    or skijoring if you have the family dog with you

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    I suggest you patent this concept right away and get some ice skis on the market.

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