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Thread: Spring '08 Presidential Traverse

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scared But Eager
    Elevation gain seems like a wash so why north to south? Is it b/c Crawford's an easier way down than Valley Way? And how does Airline compare to Valley Way?
    I was thinking of a winter traverse where north to south is more common. In summer it doesn't matter.

    I've never done Airline, just Valley Way. One route is on a ridge, one is in the valley. Next time I'm in that area I want to do Airline. If the weather is poor Valley Way might be the better route with less exposure.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scared But Eager
    Elevation gain seems like a wash so why north to south? Is it b/c Crawford's an easier way down than Valley Way? And how does Airline compare to Valley Way?
    Either way is fine. For a multi-day the length of hike first/last day is probably the deciding factor. Crawford Path and Valley Way are both pretty straight forward either up or down. Airline is not much different in difficulty from Valley Way. It is less protected in spots (and accordingly has better views). Weather is probably the deciding factor in that choice.
    Mark

    Keep close to Nature's heart...
    and break clear away, once in awhile,
    and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods.
    Wash your spirit clean. - John Muir


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  3. #13
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    Default Re:Why North to south?

    It's been my experiance and personal preferance to get the tough stuff
    over early... thus North to South. Do carefull recon of maps (mark those escape routes) before starting, do your home work, it's a good idea to have folks down below incase support is needed, use common sense! the mountains will be there, thay are not going anywhere.
    and keep an eye on the weather!... it changes so quick up there...
    that being said Enjoy!

  4. #14
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    Default Dumb question about escape routes

    Plans going well - have a hiker buddy who's committed to join me, and another considering. As I have told my friends in seeking recruits, if the weather is threatening, we are not going. (Well, maybe Valley Way up to Madison Hut like the Boy Scout troop, but I have no desire or intention to be above tree line in anything remotely approaching bad weather.) Also have friends prepared to be support down below.

    Here's a dumb question about escape routes. I remember the comment about Huntingdon's Ravine NOT being an escape route. And I have the Washburn map as well as the maps that came with the White Mountains trail guide. I also remember reading about a plastic map, I think. My question is, what is the actual physical technique or method for marking these things, especially given that if you need an escape route you might be in a white-out? What do people recommend, and what do the smart people do?

    And what NOT to do?

    Thanks, fellas.

    Eric

  5. #15
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    mtruman, I really enjoyed that album of wonderful images of a hike summer hike.

    The northern slopes of Northern Presidentials are more likely to have ice than the western slopes of the Southern Presidentials. Other than that consideration, I'd go either way.

    happy trails
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    by Patrick LaFreniere
    new site: www.pbase.com/myworld

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scared But Eager
    Here's a dumb question about escape routes. I remember the comment about Huntingdon's Ravine NOT being an escape route. And I have the Washburn map as well as the maps that came with the White Mountains trail guide. I also remember reading about a plastic map, I think. My question is, what is the actual physical technique or method for marking these things, especially given that if you need an escape route you might be in a white-out? What do people recommend, and what do the smart people do?

    And what NOT to do?

    Thanks, fellas.

    Eric
    Experience comes into play here. You sound well prepared, but it would be wise to spend quite a bit of time studying the maps and escape routes and committing as much as possible to memory. Photos would help too. You're right, I can't imagine pulling out a map in a white out with 80mph winds. I think somebody mentioned cheat sheets with escape routes and major landmarks. Its much easier to pull that out of your pocket than an entire map. Something laminated, maybe one for each team member.

    When you fly an airplane, pilots and their computers, spend quite a bit of their time constantly analyzing different emergency scenarios. What do I do if I lose an engine on takeoff, where is the nearest airport, how far can I glide? This allows them to immediately react if an emergency occurred.

    It would be wise in a traverse to be doing the same things. You've reached Madison Hut and the weather turns bad...easy choice to head back down. You're an hour south of Madison and the weather turns...now what do you do? Constantly be making mental notes of where you are on the mountain and what the best options are.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    You've reached Madison Hut and the weather turns bad...easy choice to head back down. You're an hour south of Madison and the weather turns...now what do you do? Constantly be making mental notes of where you are on the mountain and what the best options are.
    Sage advice! This way of thought keeps you in better mental control of your situation, so if the weather starts to get ugly you've already been thinking about your best present options. It will also help you enjoy your hike even if the weather is beautiful because you'll be more at ease, and you'll become more familiar with the different areas that you hike through.

    happy trails
    nature photography of the White Mountains
    by Patrick LaFreniere
    new site: www.pbase.com/myworld

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