Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Hope your enjoying....

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wayne New Jersey
    Posts
    399
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 6 Times in 5 Posts

    Default Just alittle windy

    Hey did anyone hear if anyone climbed Wasington in the past couple days with this wind? I can't imagine being in winds over 150 miles per hour. I can't wrap my mind around it. Being on level ground is one thing but on top of a mountain in those winds?? If someone did summit would love to know what it was like. For the guys in the observatory is it even possible to summit in those winds?? I know there are people who climb in anything but this is EXTREME!! over 150 wow!!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,680
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 33 Times in 29 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rockin rex
    Hey did anyone hear if anyone climbed Wasington in the past couple days with this wind? I can't imagine being in winds over 150 miles per hour. I can't wrap my mind around it. Being on level ground is one thing but on top of a mountain in those winds?? If someone did summit would love to know what it was like. For the guys in the observatory is it even possible to summit in those winds?? I know there are people who climb in anything but this is EXTREME!! over 150 wow!!
    Since the 158mph wind happened after 1am, I doubt anybody was up there climbing. Even if it was during the day my answer would still be the same. Nobody could summit or walk or even stand in 150mph winds. On top of Mount Washington a 150mph wind exerts over 500 pounds of force on the average human body. For comparison, a 100mph wind exerts a mere 240 pounds of force. That's why I am very skeptical when people say the summitted in just 100mph winds.

    And that is just the force of the wind. Breathing is another problem. Imagine trying to suck in a breath of air as a 150mph tries to suck it out of your lungs.

    I almost forgot. Rain drops sting at 40mph, imagine snow and flakes of ice at 150mph!

    This doesn't take into account that these winds were recorded at 10 meters above the surface. Friction greatly increases as you near the ground. From my experience this decrease in wind speed is easily offset by gusts and lulls. Leaning against the 240 pounds of force during a 100mph wind is possible, but as the windspeed changes you need to constantly adjust your stance. Its not always the wind that knocks you down, its the lulls.
    Last edited by Bill O; 10-30-2006 at 03:41 PM.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    158!

    Holy Cow! Gratz!

    I wish I were are up there for that!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,247
    Thanks
    112
    Thanked 398 Times in 250 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    I seemed to have misplaced my trusty Hays Chart conversion table so I can't analyze all those winds, but it looks like the 1am hour averaged over 8 inches.
    Bill,

    How do you read a chart like this?
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet Personal photo web site
    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,680
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 33 Times in 29 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brad
    Bill,

    How do you read a chart like this?
    Not very well without the conversion table. There is a specially calibrated table that was made just for the MWO pitot anemometer. From what I remember 10 inches (the outside of the wheel) is equal to 140mph. But I don't think it is linear so you can't just correlate 5 inches to 70mph and so on.

    A little more background. The graph is changed once a day, its on a 24 hour loop. The red pen draws continuously as the paper spins slowly underneath. For winds above 140mph there is another chart that will cover winds up to 300mph, should the day ever come. The chart is in inches (opposed to mph) because the wind is pushing on a column of water. The stronger the wind, the higher the water column reaches.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Mount Washington
    Posts
    17
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetstream
    Hi Bill,
    the sustained and peak winds beaking the current building record.

    With that said I got a crazy idea -- I know there are audio recordings of the wind from the 19-20July96 event -- ( sumit crew: ) is there any audio / video being taken of the winds from this event? Such would be great gifts .

    -- Jetstream
    Hi Jetstream,

    Mike Pelchat from state park had his video camera at the time...here's the video!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7fDEbd8tKM

    ~SummitStaff

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lowell, MA
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Simply put "Amazing"!!!

    I had been watching the winds increase over the day. Since I am south of Mt Washington, I knew they were going to continually pick up throughout the day and night. Unfortunately I wasn't on when you hit 158.

    I'm on here everyday looking at the latest info, keep it up great work up there!!!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Roanoke, Virginia
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    When wind speeds exceed 100mph or even 150mph is this attributed to the Jet Stream being almost at ground level in relation to the mountain top?

    This weekend, the passing front was significant even in Virginia with gusts over 60mph.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,680
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 33 Times in 29 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by harrywaldron
    When wind speeds exceed 100mph or even 150mph is this attributed to the Jet Stream being almost at ground level in relation to the mountain top?

    This weekend, the passing front was significant even in Virginia with gusts over 60mph.
    Not exactly, the jet stream you are thinking of is usually found around 30,000 ft, plus or minus 10,000 or so.

    Over the weekend there was a "jet" of high wind speed in the atmosphere at the same height as Mount Washington. Most likely, this area of high winds was squeezed between the mountain below and a stable layer above so wind speeds were forced to increase.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •