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Thread: What to wear

  1. #11
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    Come prepared for anything and everything. Your day pack should essential be backed for any kind of condition as well as protection for an overnight in the worst case scenario since it takes hours to help someone and you don't want to be sitting out in the open while you wait. April is in what we call the shoulder seasons (spring and fall) and are usually when we have the most rescues. This is because people start off in 40+F weather at the base thinking it is like that at the top and get caught in 10-20F (or worst) weather at the top with higher winds making it feel colder. Most wear tennis shoes and cotton which are the enemy up here. And some of the largest snow storms I have experienced up here have occured in either April/May and October/November. Also take caution coming up any trail because the excessive snow is causing avalanches and sluff off in locations that have not seen activity in neary 30-40 years. If you read the avalanche report today, you'll see what I mean. Bottom line, be careful, be prepared, and be aware.

    Ryan Knapp
    Staff Meteorologist, KMWN

  2. #12
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    CHECK AVALANCHE DANDER FIRST!

    Personally, if the danger is not rated low I stay well away from anything that is known to slide. That would include the winter route up to Lion Head, a trail designed to avoid avalanche danger on the summer route.

    Consider hiking Boot Spur Trail. It is longer, but it is safer, has steadier grades, and it's incredibly scenic. Along the way is an outlook called Harvard Rock. I witnessed an avalanche from this safe viewpoint, which is perhaps a mile away. The noise of that avalanche was amazing. I will never go anywhere near avalanche danger because of that experience.

    I assume that Tuckerman Ravine will be more full of snow than in recent years. There will be many people skiing the bowl in mid-April, especially on a weekend. The easiest route to the summit just might be TRT to the bottom of the bowl, and then follow the skiiers, as they will have kicked steps into the snow all the way up to the snowfields, where you can continue to the summit. As you look up, to the right is about the most popular/easy way up. I've only done this once with my snowboard, on May 1st, 2002 (?). There was so much snow in the bowl that part of the lip was gone. It was just a steady slope of snow from bottom to above where the lip usually is. These conditions may be the case this April.

    For clothes, I agree about layers. Bring extra shirts and hats so you can change out of your sweaty shirts and hats once you get to the top. Bring extra neck gators and mitts.

    happy trails
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    by Patrick LaFreniere
    new site: www.pbase.com/myworld

  3. #13
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    What's your plan if a sunny, warm 40 degree day turns into a windy 25 degree day or colder? I'm not talking about clothing, but your lack of ice axe, mountaineering boots and crampons.

    It was probably easy stomping up the trail in the soft snow, but if that freezes up on you that is a big problem.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  4. #14
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    Absolutely, they should have traction. I don't use mountaineering boots or ice axe, but I would recommend them.

    When I went, I used snowshoes and my snowboard boots (warm and comfy) on the well-packed TRT all the to the bowl. Then I traded the snowshoes for 10pt. crampons, which also fit well over the snowboard boots, for the ascent up to the snowfields, then back to snowshoes to the summit. So, I essentially had three different modes of travel, and luckily, the ride down was the most pleasant and exhilarating ride of my life.
    Last edited by forestgnome; 03-09-2008 at 10:34 AM.
    nature photography of the White Mountains
    by Patrick LaFreniere
    new site: www.pbase.com/myworld

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by KD Talbot


    Nuff said!

    KDT
    Excellent! I've never seen the famed arch, just missed it once.
    nature photography of the White Mountains
    by Patrick LaFreniere
    new site: www.pbase.com/myworld

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