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Thread: Late July 08 Presidential Traverse

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    Post Late July 08 Presidential Traverse

    Hey guys, I've been lurking on the forums for a while, I finally decided to sign up.

    I whipped together a page detailing my plans for tackling the Presidential Traverse... On it, I have very detailed plans, pictures of my equipment, etc... I'd like some Criticisms on my Equipment and whatnot.

    http://thetrailwiki.org

    TheTrailWiki.org is a website i've started up. Pretty straightforward if you wanna check out the rest of the site.
    Last edited by h2oeco; 07-06-2009 at 03:31 PM. Reason: To remove a broken link at ThomasW's request.

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    I'm not exactly sure that you need a b.b. gun, but whatever floats you boat. When I was backpacking at Philmont my crew only needed a small plastic trowel to dig cat holes so I doubt you will need that big shovel.

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    BB gun?? Leave that military shovel at home and get a plastic trowel at Wal-mart for a buck. Don't forget to wrap the handle with plenty of duct tape.

    No camping on Franklin. You'd have to continue to Nauman to set up camp. Not far from Mizpah which is on your next day's plan.
    ~Rich

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    When you say walking down the Cog, do you mean as in along its descent or on the actual tracks? It would be much easier to descend using the trails, such as the Jewell, but that's up to you and how far you plan on going down, as long as its below treeline. Someone else may know this better than I, but I'm not sure at certain times of the year if anyone is able to use the tracks for hiking, especially in the high-tourist month of July.
    "LIVE FREE OR DIE...DEATH IS NOT THE WORST OF ALL EVILS." Gen. John Stark. "by reason of much foule weather and Extreme Bad Woods to travel in..." From the letter of my Great Uncle, Samuel Willard (accompanied by my grandfather Henry), to Governor Dummer on August 16, 1725, explaining the reason for his return, being instructed to "range all the country", of the Wawobadenik (White Mountains) July 19-August 16, 1725. I am a 13th generation New Englander and proud of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich
    No camping on Franklin. You'd have to continue to Nauman to set up camp. Not far from Mizpah which is on your next day's plan.
    We Wouldn't be Camping near the summit, as far as we know, we can't see anything wrong with our site based on This Page, But this is exactly why I thought to post here, you guys know better than we.

    Regardless, I've adjusted the page as an alternative to use the Nauman Platform.

    BB Gun? Suggested by my counterpart, I think right after that girl was killed down south a couple months ago. Constructively, I removed it.

    Quote Originally Posted by FisherCat
    When you say walking down the Cog, do you mean as in along its descent or on the actual tracks?
    Along its descent no doubt. We assumed that there were clearings nearby and that at some points the track is raised. At no point do I aim to walk on the tracks, my luck I'll break something!

    Also, I haven't ordered maps yet from the AMC or MWO that show individual trail names, I've seen a thread of a similar nature posted here on how he can't find any good pages that outline which trails are which, I'm a very visual person and looking at maps is my thing.

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    Along its descent no doubt. We assumed that there were clearings nearby and that at some points the track is raised. At no point do I aim to walk on the tracks, my luck I'll break something!
    You may still find a trail like Jewell better, there aren't many "clearings" there, just a mass of uneven, scattered rock & boulders like you would find elsewhere on the summit cone, yet, the choice is stll yours.
    "LIVE FREE OR DIE...DEATH IS NOT THE WORST OF ALL EVILS." Gen. John Stark. "by reason of much foule weather and Extreme Bad Woods to travel in..." From the letter of my Great Uncle, Samuel Willard (accompanied by my grandfather Henry), to Governor Dummer on August 16, 1725, explaining the reason for his return, being instructed to "range all the country", of the Wawobadenik (White Mountains) July 19-August 16, 1725. I am a 13th generation New Englander and proud of it.

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    Walking on the tracks in July would not be possible. First because the train is running constantly and I think it's illegal. Second If you were on Jacobs ladder while a train was coming that would surely not be good.

    I agree with Fishercat, the Jewell Trail is your best bet because it is a trail. The cog area isn't really conducive to hiking on.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasW
    We Wouldn't be Camping near the summit, as far as we know, we can't see anything wrong with our site based on This Page, But this is exactly why I thought to post here, you guys know better than we.

    Regardless, I've adjusted the page as an alternative to use the Nauman Platform.

    BB Gun? Suggested by my counterpart, I think right after that girl was killed down south a couple months ago. Constructively, I removed it.



    Along its descent no doubt. We assumed that there were clearings nearby and that at some points the track is raised. At no point do I aim to walk on the tracks, my luck I'll break something!

    Also, I haven't ordered maps yet from the AMC or MWO that show individual trail names, I've seen a thread of a similar nature posted here on how he can't find any good pages that outline which trails are which, I'm a very visual person and looking at maps is my thing.
    Steve
    Is there really any BAD weather???

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    Military shovel not needed. They're great for making foxholes to dodge mortar fire, but a small plastic trowel will be adequate for your sanitary needs.

    Mosquito head gear is probably overkill.

    Your clothing list is obviously missing some items. But a warm hat and light gloves are essential all summer long.

    I'm not gonna lie, I wouldn't bring many of the items on your list. But its your preference. Best to learn what works and what you don't need. You'll narrow down your camping style over time.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

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    Default The Cog

    I forgot about the Cog.

    The right-of-way is only to be used during emergencies. Its private property.

    There may be a clearing in the trees, but there is no trail. Please stay on the trails at all times. Above tree line your feet can do severe damage to the gentle tundra.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

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    Default Rules

    I've posted this about a thousand times so far, I don't get sick of it, but I'm sure others do. The rules you have found basically cover below tree line camping. Here's more detailed rules for the Presidentials:

    CAMPING

    Presidential Range-Dry River Wilderness

    Wilderness regulations, intended to protect Wilderness resources and promote opportunities for challenge and solitude, prohibit use of motorized equipment or mechanical means of transportation of any sort. Camping and wood or charcoal fires are not allowed within 200 ft. of any trail except at designated campsites.
    Hiking and camping group size must be no larger than 10 people. Camping and fires are also prohibited above the treeline (where trees are less than 8 ft. tall), except in winter, when camping is permitted above the treeline in places where snow cover is at least 2 ft. deep, but not on any frozen body of water. Many shelters have been removed, and the remaining ones will be dismantled when major maintenance is required; one should not count on using any of these shelters.

    Forest Protection Areas

    The WMNF has established a number of Forest Protection Areas (FPAs)—
    formerly known as Restricted Use Areas—where camping and wood or charcoal fires are prohibited throughout the year. The specific areas are under continual review, and areas are added to or subtracted from the list in order to provide the greatest amount of protection to areas subject to damage by excessive camping, while imposing the lowest level of restrictions possible. A general list of FPAs in this section follows, but since there are often major changes from year to year,
    one should obtain current information on FPAs from the WMNF.

    (1) No camping is permitted above treeline (where trees are less than
    8 ft. tall), except in winter, and then only in places where there is at least
    2 ft. of snow cover on the ground—but not on any frozen body of water,
    and not on the east face of Mt. Washington's summit cone from Boott
    Spur to Nelson Crag (the area above Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines,
    including the Alpine Garden area). The point where the above-treeline
    restricted area begins is marked on most trails with small signs, but the
    absence of such signs should not be construed as proof of the legality of
    a site.

    (2) No camping is permitted within a quarter mile of any trailhead,
    picnic area, or any facility for overnight accommodation such as a hut,
    cabin, shelter, tentsite, or campground, except as designated at the facility
    itself. In the area covered by Section 1, camping is also forbidden within a
    quarter mile of Glen Ellis Falls.



    Forget building any fires, get a small, lightweight white gas backpacking stove if you don't already have one. I lost track, you had so much gear. Try to keep the pack under 25-30 lbs, that would be enough gear for a winter attempt! I have trouble getting myself over those hills on day hikes, never mind over 30 lbs of gear.

    I agree with the others, lose the shovel and gun, too much added weight, and besides, shootin' an attacker with a bb gun would just pis_ them off. You'll be 99 99/100ths% safe. Millions of hikers hike millions of miles every year and there was only a couple of incidences.

    The mosquito headgear I'd keep. It weighs nothing and the mosquitos and blackflies can still be miserable at that time of year. I hate using bugspray, but it's a personal preference. You probably won't need anything above tree line, but that isn't always true. It's when you stop that they swarm. Makes fall and winter hiking much more enjoyable in the Whites.

    KDT

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