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Thread: Garmin GPSMAP 60CSX gps

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorque View Post
    With the GPS capability of many smart-phones, are the days of the dedicated GPS unit over. As long as one can get a cell-phone signal, Google maps of the area can be downloaded and cached beforehand. If a cell-phone signal cannot be received, the smart-phones, with an app, will display accurate longitude and latitude for use with a map. Any thoughts for or against?
    On the Pro argument I would say the Smart-phone option is good because you will always have the updated maps and points of interest(POI) data. with dedicated GPS units you only have your last updated map and with the expense of thos, you might not keep them as up to date. This is really good around town finding restaurants and other services.

    On the Con side I harbor the suspicion that most all-in-one devices don't really do any one this in an optimal manner. Generally, in order to fit all thise features into one package, some sacrifices must be made. I am not all that familiar with too many smart-phones, but do they offer a large library of user collected waypoints? Usually I like a device that is specifically designed for the task at hand. Besides, this way I get more stuff!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorque View Post
    With the GPS capability of many smart-phones, are the days of the dedicated GPS unit over. As long as one can get a cell-phone signal, Google maps of the area can be downloaded and cached beforehand. If a cell-phone signal cannot be received, the smart-phones, with an app, will display accurate longitude and latitude for use with a map. Any thoughts for or against?
    I am PRO on this. I have been thinking of getting a GPS unit, but once Verizon releases the Palm Pre, which has built-in GPS, I plan on using that. I will just cache the maps I need before heading into an area where I will most certainly lose data coverage.

    The only down side is that I hear the Pre's battery life will be shortened while using the GPS, but that's why they sell extra batteries. And in the car, I plan on just keeping it plug in.

    On the Pre subject, people are really beginning to write some amazing Apps for the WebOS, so I am sure many will have some really cool features utilizing the GPS.
    Last edited by Snow Miser; 12-22-2009 at 12:19 PM.
    Bob

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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorque View Post
    With the GPS capability of many smart-phones, are the days of the dedicated GPS unit over. As long as one can get a cell-phone signal, Google maps of the area can be downloaded and cached beforehand. If a cell-phone signal cannot be received, the smart-phones, with an app, will display accurate longitude and latitude for use with a map. Any thoughts for or against?
    I wish the smart phone was a little better option but for hiking I don't think they're quite ready to replace a dedicated GPS. For one thing the standard Google Maps app doesn't support the terrain view (and even if it did it's not a real topo map). I also don't believe that there's any way to get Google Maps to pre-cache the maps so you still need a cell signal. I'm sure that with the improving capabilities of the smart phones that there will be other sources for better maps and GPS apps to go with them. Don't get me wrong - I love my new Droid Eris and Google Maps is awesome on it and I use the app constantly - just not for hiking. The Google My Tracks app is also really good for recording track logs and syncing to Google My Maps on the web and importing into Earth.
    Mark

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  4. #24
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    You said it right in your post, "good reception" that excludes the White Mountains.

    I did buy AccuTerra for my iPhone. It's an offline GPS, but you have to buy the topos for each state, and it's a bit pricey for an iPhone app. But, it does let you go offline and use it (unlike Google Maps).

    Also, true GPS's like the Garmin GPSMap 60CSx are rugged and water resistant.

    There are newer models like the Colorado and now there's even more new models, so really it depends on how you're going to use it, and if you're going to keep it in a pocket until needed or clipped to a pack.

    I carry my iPhone when I'm out in the woods, but it's usually shut off, since reception is very spotty. Don't want to kill the battery searching for a tower.

    Kirk

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    BTW: Here's the link to AccuTerra

    http://www.accuterra.com/

    The issue I found is the battery life on the iPhone isn't great to begin with, and with the screen lit up, it really eats the battery (as does haven't the GPS running).

    On my handheld Garmin, it's rated to go 18 hours on 2x AA batteries.

    Of course be smart about it, if you're breaking for lunch for a 1/2-1 hour, turn the unit off - just remember to turn it on when you start up again, so you can log your progress

  6. #26
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    Gotta agree with the folks here about smartphone GPS's. I've owned a few smartphones with built in GPS capability and while nice in the car for directions I wouldn't use it for a hiking GPS. Battery life goes away quickly, the chipset isn't up to par with a good hiking GPS so trees and heavy cover make getting a satellite lock difficult, and finally the mapping software itself either has to load via a cell signal or even if it is preloaded I haven't found one specifically with hiking trails on them for my phone.

    Mark........Droid Eris, nice. I have the HTC Magic running Android. I love it.
    Last edited by billysinc; 12-23-2009 at 09:48 AM.

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    I have to thank you guys for the recommendations on using a single GPS unit over one in a smartphone for hiking. It's good to be on the forums here to get advice from those that have experience with things like this. I will have to check out some of the models mentioned above, and order a Christmas present for myself. Thanks again!
    Bob

    I never want to see a day
    That's over forty degrees
    I'd rather have it thirty,
    Twenty, ten, five and let it freeeeEEEEEEeeze!

    My Seek the Peak 2014 Photo Set

  8. #28
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    Great list of pro's and con's. Thanks.
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    And this'll help things turn out for the best. And always look on the bright side of life.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by billysinc View Post
    Gotta agree with the folks here about smartphone GPS's. I've owned a few smartphones with built in GPS capability and while nice in the car for directions I wouldn't use it for a hiking GPS. Battery life goes away quickly, the chipset isn't up to par with a good hiking GPS so trees and heavy cover make getting a satellite lock difficult, and finally the mapping software itself either has to load via a cell signal or even if it is preloaded I haven't found one specifically with hiking trails on them for my phone.

    Mark........Droid Eris, nice. I have the HTC Magic running Android. I love it.
    Actually the battery issue for the phone is probably the biggest one. Lucky to get 4-5 hours using the GPS with My Tracks. The good thing about the dedicated GPS is that not only is the battery life longer, but it's easy to carry spares (particularly AAs).

    I hadn't heard about AccuTerra before Kirk's post. Looks pretty interesting. Now they just need an Android version. I agree with you Billy - I love the Android phone. Getting better all the time with the increased focus from the software community on new apps and the big focus from Google on improvements. Can't wait for Android 2.0 (or 2.1) on the Eris and all the additional goodies that that will bring. VZ says sometime next month...
    Mark

    Keep close to Nature's heart...
    and break clear away, once in awhile,
    and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods.
    Wash your spirit clean. - John Muir


    Hiking photos: http://picasaweb.google.com/mtruman42
    Hiking Blog: http://theramblingsblog.blogspot.com/
    Seek the 2011 Peak page: Mark Truman's Pledge Page

  10. #30
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    FWIW... I've got a Garmin Oregon 400T and an iPhone 3GS. Battery issues aside, I've purchased the Groundspeak iPhone App for Geocaching so I could get cache info anytime/anywhere. I've done some side-by-side tests of using both devices simultaneously to actually navigate to caches and I'd be really hard pressed to say which one is better.

    I'll continue to carry both and I think in an emergency one of my first steps would be to take a photo of myself with the iPhone and immediately post or mms it to someone, as that would show condition, place and include the GPS coords of where I was.
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