Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Question on the Aurora Borealis.... in WA

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Question on the Aurora Borealis.... in WA

    I have always wanted to see this but AK is a distance away from WA. Is it possible to see this phenomenin in WA?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Colorado, for now
    Posts
    468
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    To find out look here
    http://www.spaceweather.com/

    You can even subscribe, for a fee, to a service that will call you on the phone when there is an aurora predicted.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,679
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 33 Times in 29 Posts

    Default

    Actually, Alaska isn't very far from Washington at all.

    Yes, under the right conditions you can see the aurora in WA.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Mount Washington, NH
    Posts
    362
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 110 Times in 42 Posts

    Default

    If NH can get AURBO's (METAR for Aurora Borealis), then WA, who is equal in latitude with NH for the most part, can get them. I know for a fact that WA has seen them because while growing up in CA, I saw at least three memorable ones and that is much further south than WA. Although they might night be as brilliant as Alaska's, they are still visible by the naked eye. Although this time of year, they are the rarest of rare. They are a tad more common in winter due to earth's tilt and the longer nights. Spaceweather.com is good or we use: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/pmap/ for an almost hourly forecast map of where they will be and their strength.
    Ryan Knapp
    Staff Meteorologist/Night Observer, KMWN (Mt Washington Obs., NH)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Colorado, for now
    Posts
    468
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Right now though, we are trending toward a solar minimum, a lull in sunspot activity, and the causes of the aurorae are lowered. That said, I have seen a few spectacular photos of some activity at the South Pole.

    http://australyear.blogspot.com/2008/07/six-months.html

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Colorado, for now
    Posts
    468
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Just a heads up, there is a forecast for this weekend

    AURORA WATCH: Around the Arctic Circle, moonlight will compete with Northern
    Lights. A solar wind stream flowing from a coronal hole on the sun is due to
    hit Earth on Sept. 13th or 14th, possibly sparking high-latitude geomagnetic
    storms. Sky watchers from Alaska to Scandinavia should be alert for auroras.


    rom www.Spaceweather.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •