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Thread: Osceolas, Aug. 2, trip report

  1. #21
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    Default Great stuff!

    You could probably cut back to one bivy if you could both fit in it. 2 nights is probably unlikely on the more popular trails you seem to be hiking. I'm sure you could lighten your load somewhat, the main objective is, after all, to enjoy the hike! Might speed you guys up a little bit, too!

    KDT

  2. #22
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    When in college I did the last summer before graduation working at a girls' camp in Maine as co-Trip Leader. Yes, I had experience but they also knew it would be better to have a male along. So, I was the token male.

    Actually was a great summer and we did some fantastic trips - I am even now still telling stories about that summer. Wonderful memories. And we were safe on the trails and on the rivers.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
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  3. #23
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    Default Old School

    "they also knew it would be better to have a male along"

    Not what today's trail hiking woman wants to hear, Brad. Might get you maced!

    KDT

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    There are times I hike alone and there are times I would not do it. It all depends on where, what day of the week and the weather forecast. We all make our own choices. When a summer camp is responsible for other people's children they may make different decisions than we do. I do like the suggestion of hiking with a whistle - no matter who you are.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by KD Talbot View Post
    You could probably cut back to one bivy if you could both fit in it. 2 nights is probably unlikely on the more popular trails you seem to be hiking. I'm sure you could lighten your load somewhat, the main objective is, after all, to enjoy the hike! Might speed you guys up a little bit, too!

    KDT
    True. Well, I need the work-out anyway. Plus, I could always pin a would-be attacker with my pack. Crush his legs with it or something.

  6. #26
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    Default very interesting thread

    First let me respond to hiking alone and with a child. Any parent who hikes alone with a child has to realize that it is their full responsibility for that childs well being no matter what. I think from what I read here Trish is fully prepared to be out there with Alex. I hike alone with my kids all the time and I always go over what to do if something were to happen to me. I have even taught my fifteen year old (when he was 9) how to drive a car so in case of an emergency he could drive for help. At 15 he drives better than me though he can't "legally" be on the road. Now for personal safety when hiking. There are books written on this subject. Bottom line is you have to follow your insinct. If you feel the person is bad, than the person is bad no matter what others might say. I have thru hiked the A.T., Long Trail and many other miles and have met MANY unusal people. I have hiked 25 miles in a day and come to a shelter only wanting to stop for the night but have not felt comfortable with who was there and headed on. Problem here is when that unusal soul gets between you and your child. For me then it is all bets off. Only the parent at that moment knows what is best. When I hike with my kids I am always watching who I cross paths with just as Trish did. When she saw the guy for the 2nd time her radar went off. I can't say what would be best but I would have probably looked for the nearest hiker and explained what was happening. Maybe even hike out with them if it was really bad. Again there is no right answer here. It comes down to that exact moment to what is best. Well I think I have written enough. These are just issues I deal with ALL the time.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockin rex View Post
    First let me respond to hiking alone and with a child. Any parent who hikes alone with a child has to realize that it is their full responsibility for that childs well being no matter what. I think from what I read here Trish is fully prepared to be out there with Alex. I hike alone with my kids all the time and I always go over what to do if something were to happen to me. I have even taught my fifteen year old (when he was 9) how to drive a car so in case of an emergency he could drive for help. At 15 he drives better than me though he can't "legally" be on the road. Now for personal safety when hiking. There are books written on this subject. Bottom line is you have to follow your insinct. If you feel the person is bad, than the person is bad no matter what others might say. I have thru hiked the A.T., Long Trail and many other miles and have met MANY unusal people. I have hiked 25 miles in a day and come to a shelter only wanting to stop for the night but have not felt comfortable with who was there and headed on. Problem here is when that unusal soul gets between you and your child. For me then it is all bets off. Only the parent at that moment knows what is best. When I hike with my kids I am always watching who I cross paths with just as Trish did. When she saw the guy for the 2nd time her radar went off. I can't say what would be best but I would have probably looked for the nearest hiker and explained what was happening. Maybe even hike out with them if it was really bad. Again there is no right answer here. It comes down to that exact moment to what is best. Well I think I have written enough. These are just issues I deal with ALL the time.
    Thanks for your vote of confidence, Rex. And I'm impressed with your hikes! One of my life goals is to hike the AT.

    Luckily these peakbagging trails seem to be full of hikers all the time. Had we been alone on the trail, I would have been extremely worried at that encounter. However, there was a group of 8 coming back from East Osceola about half a mile or so behind us, as well as that couple who passed us a few minutes after our encounter (who had also seen ax man, and had spoken with him previously at the Osceola summit). We had also been passed by two couples who I knew were going to hang out ahead of us at the main peak. In short, I knew there were folks ahead and behind us, and that comforted me a bit.

    HOWEVER, in retrospect, the safest thing I could -- and should -- have done would have been to hike back to the main summit with that couple who passed us shortly after meeting axe man. I felt comfortable in the moment not to, but now, looking back, that would have been the smartest thing to do and I'm kicking myself over it. I knew there were many people behind us, but still, that would have been the best thing to do.

    I'm glad you hike with your son. I feel giving kids this experience (minus the Paul Bunyon encounters) is one of the best things we parents can do for them.
    Last edited by TrishandAlex; 08-05-2008 at 09:21 AM.

  8. #28
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    Maybe the guy was into lumberjack competitions and hiked with his axe for training. I mean gymnasts are known to go on runs with their pommel horses, and bowlers often carry their ball around for training.
    Bill
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