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Thread: Jefferson (2); The Link Trail ate my camera (September 6)

  1. #11
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    How was your homeschooling experience, Acrophobe?

    So far, so good for us. We've been doing formal academics with Alex for a year now, at her request. She was a very early reader and has always had a need for structure. Sage is still too young for anything very formal, so I just go over basic phonics with her right now.

    We love homeschooling. They wake up when they wake up, we do all our schoolwork in the morning, then they have the afternoon for outside play, extracurricular classes (of which there are probably too many) and playdates.

    Flexibility is key. We want the kids to work at their own pace and follow their own interests as much as possible. We will homeschool as long as everyone continues to be happy with it. We like that they can avoid school fads, bad school food, and bully issues. (We're secular, so none of this is for religious reasons). They have good friends, both homeschooled and regular-schooled.

    Back to hiking -- when they're older, and only if Sage also one day shows a love for hiking, we could take many months off and do a few long trails, or go hut-to-hut hiking in the Italian Alps. Or do some other trip that suits everyone's idea of a good time. Homeschooling enables us to potentially take off and venture outside for weeks/months.

    Bottom line is that we have more options. Our family likes to have options, neither my husband nor myself have ever taken kindly to being hemmed in.

  2. #12
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    Sorry about your camera. Just think in one or two thousand years some scientist is going to find that thing and get a glimpse into what life was like back in the 21st century.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by billysinc View Post
    Sorry about your camera. Just think in one or two thousand years some scientist is going to find that thing and get a glimpse into what life was like back in the 21st century.
    and just think of the animal in the hole is now taking pictures of all his friends
    so just think of what the scientist will think

    and better it the camera and not you that is in the hole
    i am a Summit Club member
    http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/new pictures and videos

    If your not a OBS member yet then what are you waiting for

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by billysinc View Post
    Sorry about your camera. Just think in one or two thousand years some scientist is going to find that thing and get a glimpse into what life was like back in the 21st century.
    True, didn't think of that.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrishandAlex View Post
    I didn't expect to receive so many responses on this post. I appreciate the kindness of you folks.
    Well what are friends for?? We have to watch out for each other!!
    Diane
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    Give me the outdoors, and I will show you the world!!

  6. #16
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    How was your homeschooling experience, Acrophobe?
    Well, actually, I've recently found myself regretting the fact that I was homeschooled for the whole way. I never had any friends growing up, and even now find difficulty in social situations. It, in my opinion, really doesn't prepare a young person for life beyond high school - homeschooled students tend to be less able to deal with the occasional unpleasant person that we all have to deal with, are less independent, and just less able to deal with affairs that reach beyond the home. I'm just starting tertiary education now, and I find myself dreading it more then anything else I've ever done - mostly because it's just a radical departure from the stuffy and secure confines of a home school enviroment that is all I've ever known.

    But that's just my opinion - by no means should you think I'm trying to rain on your parade. Indeed, I think homeschooling could in fact be quite beneficial during a child's formulative years.

  7. #17
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    Hi Acrophobe,

    I'm sorry you had that experience. I don't know your age, but is it possible your social situation came from not knowing many other homeschoolers? Early homeschooled kids had it tough, I think. Not too long ago, there weren't many families doing it.

    There are a TON of homeschoolers where we live near Boston, and events/social gatherings happen multiple times a week. Alex and Sage have three sets of dear friends (siblings within three families). We visit each family weekly, for hours at a time. The girls also have a myriad of outside activities where they're with other kids on a regular basis.

    Also, FYI, there have been actual studies (early 2000s) done on the "social" aspect of homeschoolers. The results conclude that homeschoolers tend to be more friendly, more able to enjoy the company of kids of all ages, and more politically active. They also, on average, outscore the "school" kids on standardized tests. And, from what I've personally seen and witnesseed -- homeschooled kids/teens seem to be pretty happy.

    I had a public school education, and I feel the same way you do, but toward "building" school. I had a stuffy building education, was only taught how to take a test, was given vast quantities of misinformation paraded as fact, had to deal with social issues one only finds in school (bullies and no parental/authority intervention), and wasted a vast majority of time having to memorize what others felt important. I was a straight-A student, but I didn't feel I learned anything except how to successfully cram for a test.

    When it came to college and grad school, I had the time of my life. Much, much different than K-12.

    So the moral? The outcome of any educational situation most likely depends on the circumstances surrounding the process. If you were an isolated homeschooler, you'll probably feel negative about the experience. If you were a bored and bullied public school kid, you'll probably feel negative about THAT experience. And so on. Luckily, today there are many choices and opportunities, so we can each create the "right" environment for our kids -- whatever "right" means to each of us, individually.


    ETA: Acrophobe and anyone else, I'd be happy to continue this conversation via pm. I suggest this because I realize, after posting the above, that the thread could move way off-topic. Don't want to make trouble with the moderators. )
    Last edited by TrishandAlex; 09-07-2008 at 10:03 PM.

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