Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Who pays for rescues in WA State?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Who pays for rescues in WA State?

    On the news last night (Portland, OR) they mentioned that to date, the rescue efforts on Mount Hood have exceeded $100,000 and, per OR law, the families may not be billed. It got me wondering about what the law is in Washington. Can anyone answer that for me? (I'm just curious because I live in WA state and have never given this any thought. I am not a climber, BTW). Thanks much.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    somerville, ma
    Posts
    68
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Smile

    even if'n they bill ya, how they gonna make ya pay? huh? it ain't like repoin' yer car. what're they gonna do? put ya back on the mountain?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thanks for your reply. What I want to know, however, is what the law actually states.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,679
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 32 Times in 28 Posts

    Default

    I have no idea, but I am almost certain the tax payers pay for the rescue. As is the case in the rest of the United States.

    Part of living in an incredibly wealthy and compassionate country is the responsibility of caring for any person in need. Whether its a lost hiker, hunter or mushroom picker to a family trapped in a burning house or the people who chose not to evacuate New Orleans.

    Many other countries have a different policy. Sometimes a rescue does not even begin until funds are secured.

    As far as the Mount Hood rescue how did they break down those costs? As far as I am concerned the cost has been nothing. Many rescuers are volunteers. Those who are not are on fixed salaries or are in the military. Much of the air support was military so they have fixed costs. The only variable is the fuel costs, but this is easily offset by quality training time gained.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,679
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 32 Times in 28 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bruno
    even if'n they bill ya, how they gonna make ya pay? huh? it ain't like repoin' yer car. what're they gonna do? put ya back on the mountain?
    Which is the case in NH. Negligent hikers have been forced to pay for rescue. At least that is the theory. I highly doubt that anybody has ever paid. Or if the state has a legal right to charge them.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    somerville, ma
    Posts
    68
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    Many other countries have a different policy. Sometimes a rescue does not even begin until funds are secured.
    whoa!! that would majorly suck. what countries do that?
    Last edited by bruno; 12-20-2006 at 12:22 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,679
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 32 Times in 28 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bruno
    whoa!! that would majorly suck. what countries do that?
    Certainly, Nepal and other very poor countries. But I have heard of this in Europe. Many climbers there carry their own personal rescue insurance. I'm guessing that when you call in a rescue you have to include your policy number
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    somerville, ma
    Posts
    68
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    Certainly, Nepal and other very poor countries. But I have heard of this in Europe. Many climbers there carry their own personal rescue insurance. I'm guessing that when you call in a rescue you have to include your policy number
    again whoa! so if ya call in and ya don't happen to have yer insurance handy or most likely ya don't have any, they say "tough luck, pal, die"?

    but this whole discussion begs the question which opens up a whole other can o' worms which is the ethics of carryin' phones and radios and beacon and such truck into da backcountry in da first place! me, i'm against it. our grandpappies didn't. i think it makes us less, well i'll say it--men. that's my honest opinion. i think all these devices take away from the adventure.

    allright, let's throwdown!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Gee, I didn't intend to veer down this path but since you brought it up, I have to wonder that for each person who gets lost, I would suspect that then wish they had a tracking device. Maybe they are purists initially, but having a device when the worst happens would be welcomed I would think. It sure would for me were I caught in that awful situation.

    As mentioned, I'm not a climber so I sure can't speak for you experts but it's just my humble opinion.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Thomaston, Connect & cut
    Posts
    277
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bruno
    again whoa! so if ya call in and ya don't happen to have yer insurance handy or most likely ya don't have any, they say "tough luck, pal, die"?

    but this whole discussion begs the question which opens up a whole other can o' worms which is the ethics of carryin' phones and radios and beacon and such truck into da backcountry in da first place! me, i'm against it. our grandpappies didn't. i think it makes us less, well i'll say it--men. that's my honest opinion. i think all these devices take away from the adventure.

    allright, let's throwdown!!
    And our greandpappies didn't converse to one another via PC's or check on the forecoming 3 day weather forecasts from NOAA either.
    When you're chewing on life's gristle
    Don't grumble, give a whistle
    And this'll help things turn out for the best. And always look on the bright side of life.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •