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Thread: summit forecasts for lower elevations..?

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    Default summit forecasts for lower elevations..?

    Are there any sites which forecast wind speeds for lower elelvations? Meaning, can I find the forecast for wind speeds at 4000 feet, 5000 feet, etc?

    I always check the upper sumit forecast here at this site, but there is probably a big difference between forecasted wind speeds at Mount Washington vs. those at, say, Garfield.

    Thanks,
    Trish

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    I would just count on it being less in the forests. Once you move above treeline expect it to be the same as the summit of Mount Washington.
    Bill
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    Really? Isn't there realistically a sizeable difference between 6000 foot plus and 4000 feet? I would think so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TrishandAlex View Post
    Really? Isn't there realistically a sizeable difference between 6000 foot plus and 4000 feet? I would think so.
    In the free atmosphere without any mountains around I'd say the difference is pretty small. I'd say that terrain features may be more important. Having 2,000 feet of tree less slopes below is certainly better than 2,000 feet of forest.
    Bill
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O View Post
    In the free atmosphere without any mountains around I'd say the difference is pretty small. I'd say that terrain features may be more important. Having 2,000 feet of tree less slopes below is certainly better than 2,000 feet of forest.

    I agree with BillO. The summits forcast was produced for above treeline areas in the White Mountains. Once you are above treeline, aspect, slope and other terrain features dictate the winds far more than the elevation.

    Two examples. The guides hiking up lionhead in the winter know that the wind on lionhead itself will be just as bad as on the summit in certain wind directions...and if their clients can make it there, they should be able to get them up to the summit.

    Another, Edmonds Col is likely a windier location than Mount Washington...
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    Thanks, guys. I appreciate the info. Still learning about all this, trying to inform myself as much as possible.

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    Temperature-wise I always peek at the auto road vertical profile. Not perfect but it's a pretty good gauge of the temps at lower altitudes.

    http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/arvp/

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