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Thread: help from my photographer friends

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orgnoi1 View Post
    Wow... this could end up being a long post from me... so for now I will say... that I agree with JimS... and when I get to work and have a couple minutes I will repost on all this...
    Looking forward to it...

    Everyone else...THANKS! Lots of great help! I used B&H back in high school when I was big into photography. Of course, it was catalog shopping or going to their store in the city. I wish my lens's from my Minolta SLR would fit on a new D-SLR.
    ~Rich

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich View Post
    Time for a new camera. What do you guys think of this deal from Best Buy.

    Canon EOS Rebel XS 10mp D-SLR w/ 18-55 lens AND a Canon 75-300 lens for $600.

    Are the Rebels a lower quality compared to the D series? I want excellent quality for under $1000. Possible? What am I shooting? Nature, family (kids), mountains, a little of everything I guess.

    Thanks for your help guys!
    OK here goes...

    First off... welcome to the dilemma that plagues just about everyone interested in getting into the dSLR field...

    The deal stated IS a good deal... but this is more a lesson about yourself than it is about the gear I guess... for myself I wouldnt buy those lenses... been there done that... but for someone who is asking if this is a good set to start up with... its great... and it will last you a long time... IF you dont plan on upgrading and arent looking to have professional image quality and pay professional image quality prices...

    What matters more than anything and always has is that the glass be as good or preferably better than the camera you choose. These days even entry level dSLRs have amazing sensor quality so with that just about any glass will work... and better glass will work REALLY well... it just boils down to what you want to spend for this hobby... will this be a hobby you will use WHILE doing other hobbies or are you planning on (like some of us) getting WAY too into it and having the bills to show for it for years...LOL

    For a newer photographer I would prefer to "sell them" on less expensive glass that will do the same as the nuclear-namebrand stuff such as Canon or Nikon... as Sigma, Tamron, and Tokina produce some really good glass. The main thing you have to remember that no matter what ANYONE tells you... YOU produce a good picture... the camera and lens dont... I have seen STELLAR shots taken with point N shoot cameras... and have seen VERY crappy pictures taken with a 1DsMarkIII and L-Lens...

    So to wrap this up in a neat little bundle for you... a Canon Rebel XS is a fine camera to start your trip down the digital SLR road... the lenses you listed will certainly be good "starter" lenses to go with... should you possibly get a higher quality lens if you can afford it?... plainly... yes... but if you cant you will certainly be ABLE to take pictures that can easily be just as good as John-Q Professional if you take the time to learn the gear you purchase... which is half the challenge right there...

    I would suggest not heeding my or anyones advice on the internet too... I would say you really should NOT do what myself and my girlfriend did and not FULLY research our initial purchase... we were both new to digital SLRs but had both shot professionally for a few years with film... we ended up buying a bunch of gear that we turned right back over and lost out on some cash in the process... so....

    I would say to follow a few of the following sites and watch both what people that are doing the shooting are saying and what the sites reviews say per each lens...

    www.fredmiranda.com <==All Brands Forums
    www.photography-on-the.net <==Canon Forums
    www.nikonians.org <==Nikon Forums
    www.northeastfoto.com <==All Brands Forums (Shameless plug for my own site for the Northeastern USA)

    If you have any specific lens Q&A I would say post up... or if you feel the need to PM send away...
    TRJ Photography
    Berkshire Scenic Railway Museum Staff Photographer
    Canon Professional Services
    Are you a photographer in the Northeastern USA? Click here for www.Northeastfoto.com

  3. #13
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    Default My 2 Cents

    Personally, I shoot canons, but I cannot asay that I would recommend them over many other brands. I know Nikons to be excellent and with the added advantage that they have maintained better backward compatability on their lenses. Remember that when you invest in DSLR, you are pretty much committing yourself to a brand unless you are willing to lose a bit of money shifting to another brand. One other thought is that if you still do have that old Minolta glass, you may want to check their compatability with Sony. I can't claim any real knowledge on that, but since Sony bought Konica-Minolta, I thought that they had retained the mounting system.

  4. #14
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    Talking My thoughts

    Orgnoi1 couldn't have said it better. You take good pictures not the camera or lens. I've been shooting with the Digital Rebel Xti for several years now. My lenses are the 18-55 that came with kit. I invested in the 70-300 IS zoom and a 10-22 Super wide zoom. This offers me quite a range of versatility. I'm lucky enough to work with a guy who once ran his own business a pro photographer. His info has been priceless. I think the big lesson in DSLR's is to know your equipment. These cameras offer quite a range of options to be creative and get great photos. My friend has taught me that although you can fix most anything in Photoshop, it's better to know how to get the shot you want in the field. Trying to scan through and fix hundreds of photos on the computer is boring. My only drawback to my equipment is that it all weighs about fourteen pounds. Decisions, decisions....all that camera equip. or beer?? That's why I started having MeridenFF tag along on our hikes in the Whites. He still thinks a six pack weighs 14 lbs. Anyhow, have fun with whatever you decide on and we look forward to you posting your pictures!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Great Guinness Ghost View Post
    My friend has taught me that although you can fix most anything in Photoshop, it's better to know how to get the shot you want in the field.

    Great advise here...not to soapbox TOO much but I believe that the "art" of photography has lost significant ground to the "art" of photoshop... nothing is wrong with processing and post processing a photo... but to take that photo the person should be able to get the best photo possible BEFORE they get to photoshop...in my humble opinion....
    TRJ Photography
    Berkshire Scenic Railway Museum Staff Photographer
    Canon Professional Services
    Are you a photographer in the Northeastern USA? Click here for www.Northeastfoto.com

  6. #16
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    Not to beat a dead horse, but everyone who mentioned the camera is fine, invest in the glass is absolutely correct.

    I had that exact same package when i ventured into dslr and found out too soon the 75 to 300 was complete garbage, what people don't realize is when extended out to 300, any movement or shaking of your hand is amplified by the distance and on cheap lenses like that you can't set the shutter speed low high enough because of lousy F stop, so you need a tripod if you want a crisp image... to compensate expensive lenses have an extremely low aperture of F1 or F2 so you can set the shutter speed very fast and still grab all available light. These usually run for thousands of dollars...this is why you see all the sideline guys with the long white lenses....

    Also, Canon and I think some others have lenses with Is or image stabilization, that helps immensely.

    I'd opt for a lower F stop and a shorter mm lens than a higher zoom any day.
    Get closer to your subject if you need.

    After I tossed that 75 to 300, I ended up with wide angle zoom that worked a lot better, a macro, a fisheye and finally invested in a longer zoom all with low F stops. To me that's so important.

    hope that helps

  7. #17
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    I've got the 70-300 Telephoto with IS, and it's alright. At full 300mm it tends to look a little foggy to me. But I have taken some great images with it.

    As for the 18-55 kit lens (that came with my Rebel XT), I don't really like it. I find it can't zoom in or out far enough to make it worthwhile.

    I occasionally use it on my 40D, but when I sell my Rebel XT, the 18-55 will go with it.

    Kirk

  8. #18
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    Talking

    Even the sideline guys with lenses worth thousands of dollars still use a monopod. Whenever possible I tripod my camera. For hiking the flexible Gorilla pod works great and it will hold this camera with a zoom lens. Thousands of bucks on lenses, or a few hundred on a good tripod and ballhead? Unless you're going to work for S. I. or freelance for Outdoor Photographer (good luck if that's your ambition) than I'd keep it simple 'til you're ready to make that leap.

  9. #19
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    Believe it or not... I barely EVER use a pod of any kind unless they are planned long exposures... theres a running joke on my site that I can handhold anything... I find that shooting wildlife (what I would use my 500L for mainly) even a monopod seems very limiting to me... I will some times keep it on but not extended so I can use it to drape the lens over my shoulder... I would probably use a pod if I was shooting team sports though since the shooting is very linear...
    TRJ Photography
    Berkshire Scenic Railway Museum Staff Photographer
    Canon Professional Services
    Are you a photographer in the Northeastern USA? Click here for www.Northeastfoto.com

  10. #20
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    We have touched on this before, but REI has very light weight trekking poles that double as a mono-pod. http://www.rei.com/product/745686

    I have a pair and love them for both hiking and it is rare I use them as a pod, but they are handy just in case. I had a pair and my wife liked them for walking the dog on an icy road, so I had to get another pair for me.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet Personal photo web site
    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

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