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Thread: It is getting closer now.

  1. #11
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    We are attempting the West Buttress on Denali in 2010! If anyone has any pointers I am all ears. I can carry 50-60 lbs (it does slow me down) but am capable of carrying 45lbs for many days without suffering much. I keep my Jandd Golith pack in my car and hike with it up hills during my lunch break. I vary the pack weight from 30-60lbs.
    I also bring a heavy pack with me when we do trips with slower people. This summer I threw 40lbs in my pack when we hiked Mt Washington with my parents. (It kept me from going to fast and it was great training!)
    Anyway, enjoy! -
    Work to live, live to play, but never live to work.
    Check out my adventures at http://www.flickr.com/photos/kfolcik/sets/

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dangergirl View Post
    We are attempting the West Buttress on Denali in 2010! If anyone has any pointers I am all ears. I can carry 50-60 lbs (it does slow me down) but am capable of carrying 45lbs for many days without suffering much.
    Crossfit.com and crossfitendurance.com

    Guided or independent?
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  3. #13
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    Thanks for the info! I checked it out and plan to read more into it later tonight!
    Work to live, live to play, but never live to work.
    Check out my adventures at http://www.flickr.com/photos/kfolcik/sets/

  4. #14
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    Default Mount Mckinley

    Dangergirl - Make no mistake - the west buttress route is indeed a long arduous climb. All I can say is train, train, train. And then train some more. Long slow workouts 1-2 hours or more - biking, hiking, slow running, mixed with some twice weekly sessions of interval training, plus twice weekly weight lifting to gain both upper and lower body strength will serve you well - try to focus on multi joint movements - squats - deadlifts etc... these are some of the things you'll see on the crossfit sites. Variety and intensity - increase both as the climb nears. Above all get out at least weekly with a heavy pack going both uphill and down. If you live in a flat area like I do, you'll need to improvise - stair climbing, step mill work, stadium steps, whatever. I live near the shore, so part of my regimen was hiking on the beach in the sand with a heavy pack, while pulling a truck tire - 2-3 miles at a clip. In addition to funny looks it will get you ready for pulling a sled on the lower part of the route up to 14k camp. Lastly - watch your nutrition and try to minimize excess body fat - look into the zone diet - it will be mentioned on the crossfit sites. It's not a fad diet, but rather a balanced way of eating regular foods, but in the right proportion of carbs-protien-fat - many small meals spaced throughout the day. I was the west buttress in late season 2007 - our team made it to 16,500 and we were turned back by unstable conditions - along with several other teams. We waited it out at 14k for 9 days until our supplies ran low. The reason I mention this is to be prepared for the mental aspect of sitting and waiting - it can really wear you down mentally - and I mean to the point where you just want to quit. I'm returning in 2009 hoping for better weather.
    Good luck - If I can answer any other questions let me know.
    Tim
    Last edited by climbabout; 12-16-2008 at 09:15 AM.

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    Good advice.

    My team hunkered down at 17,000 for almost a week waiting out the weather. Thankfully I had terrible knee pain and turned around much lower on the mountain. They did end up making it though.

    I second the zone diet. Once you figure it out its really easy to follow. Good details on crossfit. Also, many elite mountaineers are making huge improvements by following crossfit and crossfit endurance. Many dive right in and only follow those sites. Improving their strength and stamina and slashing the amount of time they train.

    For me train, train, train turned into injuries and more injuries.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O View Post
    Denali can be climbed on your own relatively cheaply. $150 park fee, $300 or so for the flight and that's it. Except for all the gear and food. I'm at a point where I'd be comfortable leading a trip there.
    I'm going out there in about two years...I'm just going to go ahead and say, Sarah Palin ruined Alaska for me...I can't wait to get there and form my own opinion..

  7. #17
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    yes, one needs to be in the best shape of their lives, but don't go overboard which could lead to training injuries which would prevent your climb and don't stop having a life because all you do is train. You could be in the best shape of your life and altitude could affect you, thus bringing your trip to an unexpected halt. Many people have climbed Everest and the following year returned only to have altitude hit them unlike the previous year. It is a gamble. Being in great shape will certainly give you a better chance, but there have been studies which have shown that those who trained for a marathon actually did worse at high altitude than a normal guy who did not train as hard. It had to do with the marathon runner's body requiring more oxygen per breath.

    One does not race up Denali. One camps their way up. As climbabout mentioned, there is indeed A LOT of down time. I have chatted with numerous professional mountaineers who have been up Denali more than a few times. As Bill O and Climbabout also hinted at, the endurance aspect is what one really needs to work on. Usually for most guided trips you will plug away for an hour then rest, then repeat. So, if your workout times are less than 1 hour, you will have to deal with another mental aspect once you get there, but that is really what it is, mental.

    I have friends who would be strong enough for Denali, but they would admit themselves that they lack the desire and mental fortitude for such an undertaking. Climbing Denali's West Buttress is indeed no glorified hike with a heavy pack, but an endurance marathon of cold, pain and playing the hurry up and wait game. I was given this nugget of advice from a mountaineer up in North Conway:

    "The ones who are most successful on mountains like Denali, are those who have no agenda, they are just there and enjoy the moment. They are not constantly worrying about whether or not they will summit." This is great advice and while I too have experienced summit fever before, I will be going with this advice in my mind's eye this coming summer.

    One more thing. I strongly agree with Bill O that one who is going to climb Denali should make him/herself very familiar with the route through photos, books, journals, informative videos and through talking with people who have been there. This is an obvious must for anyone going unguided, but is certainly a great advantage to those who plan to go guided. I have spent the last year and a half getting very familiar with the West Buttress route. It has only made me more pumped for this summer.
    Last edited by iceclimber; 12-17-2008 at 07:38 AM.
    "Commitment is doing the thing you said you'd do, long after the mood you said it in has left you." - Bear Grylls' mother

  8. #18
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    whoa mama, 1 degree up there right now. Quite a change from Orlando's current 78 degrees. That's ok, I'll be prepared. The minutes are ticking now till go time. We fly up to upstate NY tomorrow. Good thing not today by the looks of it. I just hope that a storm doesn't prevent our drive North next weekend. Merry Christmas to all.
    "Commitment is doing the thing you said you'd do, long after the mood you said it in has left you." - Bear Grylls' mother

  9. #19
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    So, how goes it everyone? Been having some cold snowy weather down here in Cato, NY. I've been sleeping out in my tent and it's been right dandy. A few more days and we'll be up in your neck of the woods. Maybe some of us will bump into each other on the mountain.
    "Commitment is doing the thing you said you'd do, long after the mood you said it in has left you." - Bear Grylls' mother

  10. #20
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    It is with great regret that I must inform all who knew about my intended trip to Mount Washington, that our trip has been postponed. We drove up from NY yesterday evening. We had a hotel booked in Woodsville (I believe) the all seasons hotel in Vermont. Well, my brother-in-law developed a serious stomach flu on the way up and by the time we arrived around 1am to Woodsville had lost quite a bit of fluids and a great deal of stamina. So, after we woke up (or should I say I woke up as he did not sleep to well) we found that he was still in dire straits so I concluded it would be best to return home rather than pursue our trip.

    Man, that was a tough call since I had done quite a bit of planning and we were both jazzed about it.

    Well, we got back to NY this afternoon. We are both obviously bummed, but what can you do? Things happen. It was a good dose of learning that the best laid plans can come apart due to uncontrollable circumstances. I think that anyone would agree that learning to deal with disappointment and plans that fall to ruin is a trait you need to get a grasp of if you are going to have fun with mountaineering.

    Mt. Washington will still be there, Lord willing. We'll have another go one day at it. I am just grateful for the snow and cold here at my Wife's parent's home where I can still camp out and get some good cold camping in while I am up here for the holidays.

    So, sadly, there will be no pictures yet. Happy new year everyone.
    Last edited by iceclimber; 12-26-2008 at 08:44 PM.
    "Commitment is doing the thing you said you'd do, long after the mood you said it in has left you." - Bear Grylls' mother

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