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Thread: Looking to get into hiking/mountain climbing

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O View Post
    Both cardiovascular systems?
    lol my mistake... to clarify

    I try to drain both the aerobic and anaerobic systems when I train in order to get both benefits to increase my cardiovascular systeM!

    not just endurance, not just sprinting.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad View Post
    He might have said "I try to drain both my cardiovascular system as well as muscular endurance" and been a little more accurate. But, we know what he meant. Just a slip of the "s".

    I will just make sure I wave as he races up ahead of everyone else. I will stick to my "Charlie pace".
    I don't plan on rushing at all. I just meant, I train hard otherwise so I look forward to the challenge. that's all. I want to take my time and enjoy it for sure

  3. #13
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    I'm a small guy, 5'6" and 140 lbs. My strength to weight ratio is high meaning I'm strong for my size and weight. I get away with not training very hard but I wouldn't recommend this to anyone. I would imagine the bigger you are the harder it could be on you. Last year I started walking 3 miles a day and doing bleachers about a month before I headed up there and did well. The key for me is I pace myself early. I found the pace where I was breathing hard but not letting my heart race. I knew where my body was comfortable an was able to keep it there for the entire hike up. Drinking lots of water and eating energy bars, trail mix, and snacking all the way up helps a lot also.
    Steve
    Is there really any BAD weather???

  4. #14
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    My technique is to go with someone who seems to know everyone we bump into on the trail and insists on photographing them. That way, I get plenty of rest stops. ;-p

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by corey.mcentyre View Post
    My technique is to go with someone who seems to know everyone we bump into on the trail and insists on photographing them. That way, I get plenty of rest stops. ;-p
    It doesn't hurt that he's made it to the top 50 times or so and knows the route pretty well too
    Mark

    Keep close to Nature's heart...
    and break clear away, once in awhile,
    and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods.
    Wash your spirit clean. - John Muir


    Hiking photos: http://picasaweb.google.com/mtruman42
    Hiking Blog: http://theramblingsblog.blogspot.com/
    Seek the 2011 Peak page: Mark Truman's Pledge Page

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtruman View Post
    It doesn't hurt that he's made it to the top 50 times or so and knows the route pretty well too
    You're talking about Emma, right?!
    Summit Club Member
    Seek the Peak 11
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    My 48: Washington (07/07, 07/08, 07/09, 09/09, 07/10), Lafayette (08/08, 08/09), Lincoln (08/08, 08/09), Pierce (07/10), Carrigain (09/10), Cannon (10/10), Jackson (11/10), Field (11/10), Tom (01/11)

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDog View Post
    You're talking about Emma, right?!
    I would love to hike with Emma - but I know I could not keep up with her.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
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  8. #18
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    Meh, I'm a rather slow hiker (in pace, people, not mentality ) which can be annoying if I'm with people who think they need to puch the group (including leaving them behind and not taking rests)

    So, I'm working out more so I can make my May hike in a good pace, and gonna get a few lil' peaks in before then. Hopefully I'll be able to do Bear this weekend, wx and work permitting.

  9. #19
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    What I do is lead every time. I go slow, but methodically, and steadily. My best friend is fast paced, so I make him follow me. haha
    Only one way to go.. Up!

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad View Post
    The best way of getting into hiking in the Whites is to hike. Start off small and work your way up. You don't always have to summit.

    This is simple but sound advice.

    I have known many superior athletes, including marathon runners, that got beat up both mentally and physically attempting to climb Mount Washington.

    One of the most important things I have learned about hiking is the balance aspect. You always seem to have one foot on a high rock and another foot below on a tangled root. This idea of having one leg much higher than the other on various terrain is very difficult for many people.

    The other thing I have learned though hiking is that most of it is in your head.

    There are so many things to overcome:

    vertical feet
    length of hike
    weather
    who you are with
    weight of your pack
    enough water
    terrain
    how you feel

    These things I have picked up from my Dad, who is 83 and still climbing.

    The balance of a hiker and what they are thinking during the hike are crucial to a pleasant experience.

    Good luck and see you on the trail!
    Doug


    Charter Member of The J. Rayner Edmands Fan Club






    Seek the Peak 2012: http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040

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