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Thread: First-timer experiences

  1. #11
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    I have to add that when I hiked MW for the first time, my best friend and I tagged along with a group of her friends from NYC (should have known better). A group of novices paid the self proclaimed 'hike coordinator' to lead the trek. I knew I would be doing my own thing when she had told us the night before that it might be raining in the morning, so it looked like we should start out around 1pm! I told them I was heading up at 7, with or without anyone else. When we started the hike the next day (at 7am), she promptly disappeared and we didnt' see her again till the summit. 2 city boys got left behind, so we decided to hang back with them. I shared my knowledge of the Mt range etc, and found out half way up that they don't hike. I was a little peaved with their 'hike leader'. We met up with her at the summit where she rested for way too long before heading back down. Again, she took off and we didnt' see her till the bottom. Apparently no one told her that you're only as fast as your slowest person and she might have wanted to at least stop at points to wait for others to catch up. I was disgusted. People like her shouldn't hike with a group, let alone get paid for it. It didnt' ruin my experience however, since I prepared on my own, studied the trail map, knew the turn around time and was totally realistic about what to expect.

  2. #12
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    Addicted,

    A person asked to join a small group of us several years ago and we agreed. She would not stay with the group and it was extremely frustrating. We did not know where she was - did not know if she took the correct turns. It was the last time I hiked with her.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet Personal photo web site
    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

  3. #13
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    thats why i thank Ed and Brad for being good hiking partners , they would stop as soon as i was just about out of sight and wait until i got to them .and then they did not take off right away they waited until i was ready to go .
    they are true hiking friends
    next year will be different i will keep up with them
    i am a Summit Club member
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    If your not a OBS member yet then what are you waiting for

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie View Post
    next year will be different i will keep up with them
    But maybe they will have to keep up with you
    Bob

    I never want to see a day
    That's over forty degrees
    I'd rather have it thirty,
    Twenty, ten, five and let it freeeeEEEEEEeeze!

    My Seek the Peak 2014 Photo Set

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snow Miser View Post
    But maybe they will have to keep up with you
    Took the words out of my keyboard. Charlie improved a lot this past year. If he does that again I am in deep trouble.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet Personal photo web site
    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie View Post
    thats why i thank Ed and Brad for being good hiking partners , they would stop as soon as i was just about out of sight and wait until i got to them .and then they did not take off right away they waited until i was ready to go .
    they are true hiking friends
    next year will be different i will keep up with them
    Charlie mentioned several things I feel strongly about.

    1. Stay together. Put the slowest up front - or make sure the first person can see the last one. For a larger group we gave each kid a number and they would count off every once in a while.

    2. When things get stretched out too much, wait for the slower ones to catch up. When you go through a slower stretch the lead person can go faster since that is gone - but the people in the rear are still going slowly. So, set the pace so the slow ones can get through the hard part before picking up the pace.

    3. When you slow or stop to allow others to catch up, wait for them to be rested also. Many times we see lead people stop, let the others catch up, then they take off again. The slower ones never get a rest break. This is another reaosn for putting the slowest person up front. Everyone gets a break and the result is the group ends up going faster.

    2 cents from an olde camp trip counselor.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet Personal photo web site
    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad View Post

    2. When things get stretched out too much, wait for the slower ones to catch up. When you go through a slower stretch the lead person can go faster since that is gone - but the people in the rear are still going slowly. So, set the pace so the slow ones can get through the hard part before picking up the pace.
    Brad brings up awesome points, and one addendum that I would add to the one quoted above is that you could allow the slower/less experienced one to take the lead and you stay behind them. That way they can set the pace.

    When my family would take newer hikers up any summit for the first time they would usually put an experienced member of our family in the lead of the group and then another to bring up the rear. That works onl;y if you would have enough people, of course.
    "LIVE FREE OR DIE...DEATH IS NOT THE WORST OF ALL EVILS." Gen. John Stark. "by reason of much foule weather and Extreme Bad Woods to travel in..." From the letter of my Great Uncle, Samuel Willard (accompanied by my grandfather Henry), to Governor Dummer on August 16, 1725, explaining the reason for his return, being instructed to "range all the country", of the Wawobadenik (White Mountains) July 19-August 16, 1725. I am a 13th generation New Englander and proud of it.

  8. #18
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    I have a friend that hikes with me often. She broke her elbow a while back and is still afraid of falling. We always let her set the pace going down, so she doesn't feel rushed and we dont have to keep looking back to see where she is. Thankfully I have good hiking buds who aren't in a hurry and will hike slow, fast, whatever we all feel like doing. Short breaks, long breaks, etc. When we did MW, there were the 4 of us that stuck in a group. Of course it was rainy and bad visibility as we did that last .5 mile, but I kept turning around to make sure I could see all 4 raincoat colors behind me. The last guy had on yellow, so as long as I could see that yellow coat, I knew we weren't leaving anyone behind.

  9. #19
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    Default One bad decision can lead to many bad decisions

    I have hiked Washington many times but I had one hike where I made one bad decision and that one decision lead to many other bad decisions!! This could have caused me my life. I left Pinkham in the early afternoon with a pack that weighed around 50 pounds hoping to be able to stay at Hermit. I did not check to see if a spot was available but just thought I would check when I got up there and if a spot wasn't available I would head over to Lakes and the dungeon for the night. Well sure enough since it was May ( prime ski time in the bowel) there were no spots. The climb up with a full pack had tired me out and I should have known better than to head up over Lions head heading towards Lakes. As soon as I passed over Lions head the winds picked up and the temps dropped. I had left Hermit at 5 thinking I had plenty of time but my pace with a heavy pack was very slow. Just as I reached the Alpine Garden My body shut down. Hypothermia was setting in quickly and my brain was beginning to play tricks. Instead of turning around I pushed on. Just before Tucks I collapsed. It took everything I had to get up. Here I was alone, no one around and my body was going into major hypothermia. After pulling myself up I still didn't turn around. My brain at this point could not make the right choices. I made it to Tucks as it was beginning to get dark and again bad decision. I decided to try and make it down Tucks( trail was closed) knowing if I made it I would be in good hands at HoJo's. I made it as far as South Gully and the trail ended in a 50 degree slope. I was going no further. I set my tent up knowing that if the winds picked up I would be blowen off the headwall into the bowel. I woke safe and sound ( thank God) the next morning and was able to make my way down to the Ranger station at Hermit. Moral to the story. Never push beyond your comfort level and listen to your body. When hypothermia sets in wise decision making goes out the window. I was lucky but hypothermia has taken many a life on this mountain. Respect the mountain.

  10. #20
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    Hi
    Whether you plan to have extended stopovers along the way or just resting for the night and moving on in the morning, consider doing this: when you cross over state lines, drop in at the information centers (which will not be too far from the boundary) and browse through the brochures there. They will always have coupon books available for that state (some are nationwide) for hotel discounts. Also, large roadside billboards advertise hotel rates as well (only seen this in the US).

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