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Thread: NH Mt Lion Sighting

  1. #1
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    Default NH Mt Lion Sighting

    CONTACT:
    Mark Ellingwood: 603-271-2461
    Jane Vachon: 603-271-3211
    September 18, 2009


    POSSIBLE MOUNTAIN LION SIGHTING IN NEW HAMPSHIRE

    CONCORD, N.H. -- The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department today reported that one of its staff members, following up on a routine report of a mountain lion sighting, saw what is believed to be a mountain lion in a rural area of Barnstead, N.H.

    Mountain lions are known to exist in the wild in states no closer than Iowa and Florida, so it is not thought to be a dispersing wild animal, but rather is most likely an illegally released pet.

    "Survival of this type of animal is typically extremely low as they normally do not have the developed abilities to catch prey on a consistent basis, and/or may have been de-clawed," said Fish and Game Wildlife Division Chief Steve Weber. "If the animal does survive, we would expect to collect hard evidence of its existence in the form of a picture, tracks, scat and/or DNA evidence."

    Mountain lions were extirpated from their range in the Eastern United States by the late 1800s, with the exception of the endangered Florida panther. According to the nonprofit research organization cougarnet.org, there have been four confirmed reports of mountain lions in the Northeastern U.S. since 1938.

    "The Fish and Game Department receives numerous reports of mountain lions every year," said Weber. "We still have no documentation to confirm their presence. While we do not believe this is a harbinger of a recovering population of mountain lions in New Hampshire, it does add one more credible report to several others we have received over the years."

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    Copyright 2009 New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, 11 Hazen Drive, Concord, NH 03301. Comments or questions concerning this list should be directed to jane.vachon@wildlife.nh.gov.
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    Very good news clip. I suppose caution should be exercised, because if it's not a released pet, it would have all of it's wild hunting instincts. And I would hate to be on a trail one day and be tackled from behind by one of them.
    Bob

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    A friend of mine is in East Hampstead, NH and she was telling me she was in the woods a few weeks ago and saw one. She said it was smooth fur, tan, with a big thick tail that curved up at the tip and was black.

    Now there's another sighting near where she lives.

    Interesting...

    Kirk

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    This is most likely a case of a released pet. Someone bit off more than they could chew. Unfortunatley the poor animal has to suffer this winter when it can't provide for itself. I studied cases like this in college and it happens way to often.
    Think Snow

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    Quote Originally Posted by donnellyvj View Post
    This is most likely a case of a released pet. Someone bit off more than they could chew. Unfortunatley the poor animal has to suffer this winter when it can't provide for itself. I studied cases like this in college and it happens way to often.
    If it is a released pet, hopefully they can capture it unharmed and send it to a zoo somewhere so it can live comfortably it captivity.
    Bob

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    Twenty, ten, five and let it freeeeEEEEEEeeze!

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    Life would be a lot more exciting if mountain lions were re-introduced into this region. Even more so if they were re-introduced into Fairfield County, Connecticut.
    Bill
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    I do Agree!
    Think Snow

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    Default Mt Lion(s) in PA

    Several years ago, while still employed in law enforcement (read trained observer), my son, cousin and I were out hiking a logging road in Clinton County, near Hammersley Fork, PA. A Mountain Lion leaped from the embankment, onto the logging road and for the next 30 seconds to a minute, nose down, circled a spot on the road. It was totally unaware of us standing there approximately 200 feet away. It looked just like the Nittany Lion of PSU fame complete with a tail as long as its body. All three of us saw it and agreed what we saw was a Mountain Lion.

    I reported the sighting to the Forest Ranger at Kettlecreek State Park. I was politely informed I was mistaken, what I had seen was a Bobcat. Well, I have photographed Bobcats and this was no Bobcat. And, it was not a feral cat. It was a Mountain Lion. There is no doubt in my mind they are making a come back, at least here in PA. For some reason, possibly to avoid a political state vs. feds turf war, they continue to deny the existence of Mountain Lions here in PA.

    I guess that makes our sighting the fifth confirmed Mountain Lion sighting in the Northeastern United States since 1938.
    Last edited by MOAB149; 10-11-2009 at 10:59 AM.

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    I believe they are here too. Just look at all the other animals that have made huge come backs in recent years.
    Bob

    I never want to see a day
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    I'd rather have it thirty,
    Twenty, ten, five and let it freeeeEEEEEEeeze!

    My Seek the Peak 2013 Photo Set

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    Life would be a lot more exciting if mountain lions were re-introduced into this region. Even more so if they were re-introduced into Fairfield County, Connecticut.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    That wouldn't last long. They freak out now about bears & have them quickly captured & then released in Litchfield, County.

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