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Thread: My failed Mt. Liberty overnighter :(

  1. #11
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    All great tips, here's something that works for me. I always bring along a couple of one gallon ziplock bags and I basically forget about trying to dry my clothes, I just wring out the sweat from them, put them in the ziplock bags and store them in the bottom of my pack. Then I just put on something dry. Basically I use them to keep my wet pieces away from my dry pieces. Without them the sweat just ends up making everything else in the pack wet. Which stinks when you need it later.
    Drying wet stuff in below freezing temps is tough without a fire and stuffing them in the bottom of your sleeping bag works but also usually results in a damp bag.

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    Charlie (02-07-2010)

  3. #12
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    Default Wool

    Wool, wool, wool...and wool

    I wear wool long undies and lightweight hiking pants. I also sweat like crazy and I just plan to get wet. The wool underwear insulates when wet and my ragg wool gloves can be covered in snowballs and they are still warm when I stop. Like others here, I have multiple sets of clothes that I change when I'm done for the day. Usually I don't even try to wear the wet clothes again...stuff them in the bottom of the pack until he trip is over.

    I usually stay in a shelter overnight in the winter and the biggest benefits are 1) the nails and pegs to hang clothes and 2) the fact that they usauly face south or east (i.e. sunfacing) and the clothes will dry out a bit in the sunlight. I find that extreme cold (like last weekend) will freeze the sweat and you can shake out a lot of ice (freeze-drying!). This is all a nice plus, but I don't count on it.

    A light layer of wool insulates and breathes and I have had little trouble staying comfortable when I stop for 10-15 minutes.

    BTW: I keep my camelback inside my shirt (next to skin) to keep the water and hose from freezing. Works down to -10F, but it does make me look "busty"

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    Charlie (02-07-2010)

  5. #13
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    Thanks for all the tips. Depending on weather and if my flexor muscles are without pain I'm going to do a simple day trip perhaps back up Liberty or maybe North Peak to work on these details later this week.

    I clearly started off with to many layers ; as I was in fear of getting cold and not being able to warm up. I will adjust and try again to perfect the technique.

    The other problem with winter hiking is finding people to go; I seem to end up solo much of the time. This of course leads to very conservative behavior when up on the hill for obvious reasons. I figure a few more dayhikes and I'll be ready to comfortability stay overnight. I have the equipment just perfecting the technique is the issue.

    Again, much thanks for the comments many of which will go to good use on my next trip!

    -Chris
    Chris Caisse Photography
    http://chriscaisse.com

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KD Talbot View Post
    If that was happening, I'd stop and change the shirt.

    KDT
    absolutley agree and I have done such before... and as silly as it may seem I always carry a small hand towel with me in my pack just in case I need to clean something off


    BTW NEpilot I did not see it listed here or maybee I just read by it... what was your skin / base layer made of? reason I ask is cotton is the devil most people seem to say silk undershirt and then something like a polypro type shirt over it
    Last edited by smithtim; 02-05-2010 at 07:27 PM.
    'when it starts to hurt your nearly halfway and probably should get out those ropes & put your crampons on"

  7. #15
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    Default Polypro

    I've been using polypro shirts for years. I just got a Smartwool shirt and It will be my first choice from now on. I hiked 16 miles yesterday in it and stayed warm and dry all day.

    KDT

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    Charlie (02-07-2010)

  9. #16
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    i was out side working with a snow blower in that snow storm yesterday for 11hr and all i had on was a wicking short sleeve shirt and a gortex rain coat on and i was sweating but warm
    i am a Summit Club member
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  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by KD Talbot View Post
    I've been using polypro shirts for years. I just got a Smartwool shirt and It will be my first choice from now on. I hiked 16 miles yesterday in it and stayed warm and dry all day.

    KDT
    Thanks I'll have to check into trying one next time I'm up in the mountains
    'when it starts to hurt your nearly halfway and probably should get out those ropes & put your crampons on"

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