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  1. #1
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    Default Severe Weather Question

    Hi, I am working on a meteorology project and am focusing on the severe weather of Washington. Aside from the various statistics, would someone be able to explain the importance of the three converging weather systems? and why does Mount Washington receive the brunt of these systems?
    I wasn't able to find anything specifically on this on the website, but if I'm missing it or should look somewhere else, I'd appreciate any information.
    Thanks

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    Valerie10 (12-10-2010)

  3. #2
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    Would also be interested in reply.I was in Siberia two years ago and wonder why Mount Washington is so extreme given its longitude and latitude compared to northwest Siberia.

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    Very interesting question. I wish I had the answer for it. Can anybody answer this question for us?

    Thanks

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    Sorry I can't help you, but am interested in your fascinating question.

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    It is probably due to its geographic location, there are many areas like this dotted around the World where they can receive uncommon weather patterns.

  7. #6
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    On the summit in the Weather Room they have a map of the US with the major storm tracks over some period of time. Can't remember whether it is xx number of storms or a specific number of years. But, almost all either went over or close to or had some influence on the summit's weather. So, it gets slammed by storms more often than a normal location.

    Two or the three major directions (west and northwest) are the predominate paths. The way the Presidential range is located storms get funneled by the outlying parts of the range so the weather gets pushed to the center of the funnel - Mt Washington. Then when the weather and wind goes up and over Mt Washington itself the wind is squeezed like putting your thumb over the end of a garden hose - the water (wind) goes faster. From what I understand (and I am not a weather guy) it is a combination of factors - more storms - stronger due to the shape of the range - and higher winds. It all adds up to very tough conditions.

    Okay, weather folks - how was that for an explanation?
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
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  8. #7
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    From the FAQ page on this very site...

    1. Does Mount Washington really have the world's worst weather?

    It is the combination of extreme cold, wet, high winds, icing conditions and low visibility consistently found atop Mount Washington which earn it the title "Home of the World's Worst Weather". As William L. Putnam states in The Worst Weather on Earth, "There may be worse weather, from time to time, at some forbidding place on Planet Earth, but it has yet to be reliably recorded." Despite its relatively low elevation (6,288') Mount Washington is located at the confluence of three major storm tracks, and being the highest point in New England, it generally takes the brunt of passing storms. The steepness of the slopes, combined with the north/south orientation of the range, cause the winds to accelerate dramatically as they rise up from the valleys.
    Summit Club Member
    Seek the Peak 11
    Seek the Peak 10: Lions Head/Tuckermans Ravine
    Seek the Peak 09: Boot Spur (redux)
    Seek the Peak 08: Huntington Ravine
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    My 48: Washington (07/07, 07/08, 07/09, 09/09, 07/10), Lafayette (08/08, 08/09), Lincoln (08/08, 08/09), Pierce (07/10), Carrigain (09/10), Cannon (10/10), Jackson (11/10), Field (11/10), Tom (01/11)

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