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Thread: Describe the worst weather you've ever experienced on Mt Washington!

  1. #11
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    Default Always plan and play it safe.

    Weather Archive information below from August 18th. The wind seemed to have peaked when we had a mile left to Lakes and the temp dropped to 14 degrees with the wind chill. 90 MPH winds just knocked us off our feet (I was scared...we had our 11 year old boys with us) in August! We couldn't see 10 feet in from of us and when we found Lakes (thanks for the help Jake) it was like we hit the lottery. We carry a lot more equipment after that trip! Comment of the morning before the hike: we do not need winter coats it?s going to be beautiful...luckily, we made the kids bring all their winter gear. We didn?t make it to the top of Mount Washington that day. Lesson learned...we have done three hikes since with no issues and made it to the top this year. I?m a frequent viewer of this blog and love it.

    Maximum Temperature: 36?F

    Minimum Temperature: 29?F

    Peak Wind Gust: N 94 mph

    Average Wind Speed: 54.1 mph

    Liquid Precipitation: 0.44"

    Snowfall: Trace

  2. #12
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    Anthonyplt, glad you guys made out okay that day. Your experience just goes to show us all to always be prepared for the worst. Most likely the day will turn out as expected, but once in a while it doesn't.
    Bob

    I never want to see a day
    That's over forty degrees
    I'd rather have it thirty,
    Twenty, ten, five and let it freeeeEEEEEEeeze!

    My Seek the Peak 2014 Photo Set

  3. #13
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    Brad, I agree with you. 35-45 MPH wind is a struggle. I've begun hiking just recently and things are pretty heavy from time to time.

  4. #14
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    About 3 years ago. We were 1/2 way between the summit of Mt. Washington, and lake of the clouds. No mans land...and thunder/lightning storms rolled through. They struck all over the place. It was insane. It was fascinating to experience, but I wouldn't wish it on anyone. Wife doesn't let me be in charge of the forecast before we go on hikes anymore

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    Brad (12-16-2010)

  6. #15
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    Labor Day weekend several years ago, took my cousin's husband who is in his 50's. He had always wanted to hike MT W but living in PA had never gotten the chance. Hiked in some of the heaviest fog I have ever experienced in all my years growing up in, and now travelling home to, the Whites. Could not see hand in front of face.( Took a nice slider into a crevice on that rock slab as you are going up the Ammo too, surgically repaired knee was the leg that went right in. No injuries! Super slippery rocks) Once we got past Lakes then the wind started to hit us head on, cold and fast, as it came out of the north for a good ol' NWCO (North West Clear Off). By the time we summited, all clouds had blown off and we could see the Atlantic before we had to head down. That wind was biting and froze any moisture present into hoar-frost all over our clothes and faces. All that low pressure I swear gave me a ringing headache. It wasn't the worst weather I've experienced, I've certainly had worse on lesser peaks in the Whites.

    Probably the most life threatning weather was a thunder-lightning storm that almost vaporized us on a Mt Jefferson hike in July 1989, fresh out of high school. Caps Ridge Trail. Never will forget that one. I remember the lightning hitting rocks above treeline and hearing it sizzle around as it sought out an outlet into the ground. That one really was a hair-raiser!
    "LIVE FREE OR DIE...DEATH IS NOT THE WORST OF ALL EVILS." Gen. John Stark. "by reason of much foule weather and Extreme Bad Woods to travel in..." From the letter of my Great Uncle, Samuel Willard (accompanied by my grandfather Henry), to Governor Dummer on August 16, 1725, explaining the reason for his return, being instructed to "range all the country", of the Wawobadenik (White Mountains) July 19-August 16, 1725. I am a 13th generation New Englander and proud of it.

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