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Thread: Southern Mountain giving Mt Washington a run in wind speed

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    Default Southern Mountain giving Mt Washington a run in wind speed

    Looks like we have some competition from the southern Appalachians for highest wind speed. Except the one they put up on top of the mile high swinging bridge at Grandfather Mountain, only goes up to 224 mph still 7mph short of the rockpiles world record. It also has a built in feature that keeps it from freezing up, but then again they dont have as many foggy days where the rime ice accumalates like our Mt Washington

    Here is the article link from a WInston Salem, NC newspaper

    http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Sa...J_BasicArticle
    Dave Johnson

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlpineHikerFan71
    Looks like we have some competition from the southern Appalachians for highest wind speed. Except the one they put up on top of the mile high swinging bridge at Grandfather Mountain, only goes up to 224 mph still 7mph short of the rockpiles world record. It also has a built in feature that keeps it from freezing up, but then again they dont have as many foggy days where the rime ice accumalates like our Mt Washington

    Here is the article link from a WInston Salem, NC newspaper

    http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Sa...J_BasicArticle
    That link doesn't seem to work...let's see if copying and pasting this one does:

    http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Sa...J_BasicArticle

    I live in Winston-Salem (hometown for the paper article above), and have a house that's very near to Grandfather Mountain; the house is on Beech Mtn (bragging rights of highest incorporated town on the east coast).

    The mountains of NC (esp. Grandfather and Mt. Mitchell) have a lot in common with those of NH. The all-time high at MWO is 72; the highest I found for Mt. Mitchell, back almost 80 years (although missing a big chunk of the 1940s and 1950s) was 81. As already shown, they can also get rather windy.

    Even a lot of North Carolinians don't know about the mountains here. I've often left Winston-Salem in the 70s and arrived to Beech in the teens, which isn't much for you northeasterners, but still a pretty big change in temp for just 2 hrs in the car in North Carolina, which definitely doesn't have a 'cold reputation.'
    Last edited by treant985; 02-20-2007 at 12:22 AM.

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    I went to the Grandfather Mtn website and looked at their old data. They've got high wind gusts for most days, back 50 years. Here are the highest they've recorded, although it's skewed towards recently due to better equipment over the years:

    Code:
    DATE       GUST
    01-25-2006 203.55
    04-18-1997 195.50
    02-28-2006 195.05
    04-03-2005 194.35
    04-02-2005 192.05
    10-29-2006 192.05
    The wind gusts have such weird decimals because they're measured in knots by their anemometer, then converted to MPH later.

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    To get a idea what these mountains are like here are some pictures of hikes I did with my 2 grandchildren.

    Grandfather Mt.
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstre...9_grandfather/

    and
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstre...6_grandfather/

    Mt Mitchell
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstre...7_mt_mitchell/

    and
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstre...6_mt_mitchell/
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet Personal photo web site
    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

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    Nobody really talks about Grandfather Mountain because their data is so suspect. The old anemometer location was totally un-scientific.

    Approaching 200mph a couple times a year...come on. If that was really the case this forum probably wouldn't exist. Let's just wait and see what their new anemometer reports.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    Nobody really talks about Grandfather Mountain because their data is so suspect. The old anemometer location was totally un-scientific.

    Approaching 200mph a couple times a year...come on. If that was really the case this forum probably wouldn't exist. Let's just wait and see what their new anemometer reports.
    According to these articles, it seems that you are right on the mark:

    http://www.boston.com/news/local/new..._wind_gauging/

    http://www.dancaton.physics.appstate...GFMweather.htm

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    The Winston/Salem article also mentions how recording wind speeds at those ranges is very inaccurate.

    That's not exactly true. With a 3-cup Davis anemometer that may be the case, but with a static-pitot tube that argument is dead wrong.

    The pitot tube is what airplanes use to measure their air speed, typically well above 200mph. They are accurate enough to allow planes to be spaced on approach. They are also accurate enough to allow the F-15's to fly over a stadium at the precise moment the National Anthem ends. Sure, GPS is involved, but airspeed is very important.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    Nobody really talks about Grandfather Mountain because their data is so suspect. The old anemometer location was totally un-scientific.

    Approaching 200mph a couple times a year...come on. If that was really the case this forum probably wouldn't exist. Let's just wait and see what their new anemometer reports.
    Bill,
    you are correct. Last time I was there and hiked Grandfather mountain looked up at the building there and that is where the anemometer is located so whent he winds blow up agaisnt the building the speed increases.

    Sorry to out friends in NC, it is a beautiful area down there and have been vacationing in Banner Elk, NC but the wind speeds of the past I really cannot buy into. Like Bill said let see what the anemometer reads and then see. I do know that it can get quite windy down there though and am sure they have had wind speeds that are high but let see what the new anomemeter reads in the future.

    But congrats to a beautiful area of the southern Appalachians down there. Sad to see the acid kill the firs on top of Mt. Mitchell as well, another great place.
    Dave Johnson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    Nobody really talks about Grandfather Mountain because their data is so suspect. The old anemometer location was totally un-scientific.

    Approaching 200mph a couple times a year...come on. If that was really the case this forum probably wouldn't exist. Let's just wait and see what their new anemometer reports.
    I agree that several 190+ readings in a year is pretty unlikely. However, isn't it true that MWO has never observed another 180+ since that day with 231? I'm just going on memory from an old weather book by Ludlum, so I'm not sure. Was the 231 gust measured with a pitot?

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    Quote Originally Posted by treant985
    I agree that several 190+ readings in a year is pretty unlikely. However, isn't it true that MWO has never observed another 180+ since that day with 231? I'm just going on memory from an old weather book by Ludlum, so I'm not sure. Was the 231 gust measured with a pitot?
    I think that is true, unless it was in April, because nothing outside April is over 180mph.

    The 231 was recorded with a modified 3-cup, not a pitot. Well, it worked on the same principal as a 3-cup.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

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