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Thread: Massachusetts Hiker Dies on Mt Washington - 1/10/12

  1. #1
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    Default Massachusetts Hiker Dies on Mt Washington - 1/10/12

    Cross posting this link from VFTT. Very sad...

    http://www.bostonherald.com/news/reg...ome&position=6
    Mark

    Keep close to Nature's heart...
    and break clear away, once in awhile,
    and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods.
    Wash your spirit clean. - John Muir


    Hiking photos: http://picasaweb.google.com/mtruman42
    Hiking Blog: http://theramblingsblog.blogspot.com/
    Seek the 2011 Peak page: Mark Truman's Pledge Page

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    That's so sad.

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    Very sad indeed. :-(
    Bob

    I never want to see a day
    That's over forty degrees
    I'd rather have it thirty,
    Twenty, ten, five and let it freeeeEEEEEEeeze!

    My Seek the Peak 2014 Photo Set

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    Mark,
    As Kathy and Bob have said it is so sad to hear this kind of news. It's been awhile since we've heard of anyone loosing their life in the Whites.

    Donna
    "If you can't find time to fix it right, when will you find time to fix it again."

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    Mike from the State Park mentioned that the last one was in 2010. Not long enough in between.

    The fellow we talked to at the summit on Monday was not really aware of the Lion Head Winter trail. And he thought there was shelter at the summit of Mt Washington. After hearing that there was shelter instead at Lakes of the Clouds it seems he went back down. He was planning on going down the Headwall - but that would have been after dark by that time. Lion Head or the shelter would have been better options - or the Auto Road.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
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    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

  6. #6
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    I know that most here are hikers and I am total awe of the hikes that I read about and see pictures. But hiking at night and especially in winter, I think is playing with your life. I'd probably get lost in the day, never mind at night and with snow yet. How can you know if you are still on the trail?

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    You're right Kathy - winter hiking is another whole level. Not a good time to not be prepared. We've just gotten into more seriously the last couple of winters and have still only done a few 4000 footers. I try to be ultra prepared each time and always think about how to be prepared for the worst situation. I'm still always nervous anyway (which is my nature) but it's so wonderful being out there that it's worth it.

    Getting stuck after dark in winter is more of a real possibility with the short days and is an even worse thing to be unprepared for. Headlights and plenty of extra batteries are an absolute necessity. As for staying on the trail - sometimes it might be easier since the trail is broken out in the snow and therefore easy to follow. If not then it can be tough during the day as well. Not always easy to find the blazes. Above treeline you generally follow the cairns but that can be difficult as well, particularly in low visibility (snowstorm, fog, etc) and it's very hard to stay oriented when everything is white.
    Mark

    Keep close to Nature's heart...
    and break clear away, once in awhile,
    and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods.
    Wash your spirit clean. - John Muir


    Hiking photos: http://picasaweb.google.com/mtruman42
    Hiking Blog: http://theramblingsblog.blogspot.com/
    Seek the 2011 Peak page: Mark Truman's Pledge Page

  8. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to mtruman For This Useful Post:

    BAXTERCA2 (01-12-2012), Jimmy Legs and Little d (01-23-2012), KathyC (01-12-2012), Snow Miser (01-12-2012)

  9. #8
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    Mark is right on. Add to those difficulties the fact that some trails are marked with a painted blaze - on the rocks. Add any snow and they can not be seen. N Kearsarge is like that. There are several open areas where the blazes are on the flat rocks on the ground. Daytime in the summer is fine. Night time is tough. Winter you don't want to be breaking trail unless you know it real well.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
    http://bradstreet.zenfolio.com Personal Photo sales site
    http://public.fotki.com/bradbradstreet Personal photo web site
    http://public.fotki.com/MWO/saved/2012/ MWO image & video archive site 2006-2012

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Brad For This Useful Post:

    KathyC (01-12-2012)

  11. #9
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    Normally, how far apart are blazes?
    Brad, is this the hike with the fire towere that you were telling me about when you were here?

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    thats why during winter i hike from the cog railroad side, a lot safer and no need for crampons

    RIP fellow hiker

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