Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Gearing for Winter Hiking

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SW NH
    Posts
    247
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 103 Times in 60 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KathyC View Post
    I'm sorry to ask this question, but my curiousity has the best of me...

    When you are out there and wearing all of those layers and clothes nature calls must be rough.
    Ok, men have it a bit easier, but it must be tough for the girls.

    Maybe I'm the only one that thinks of these things, but I had to ask...
    I don't know if they have anything similar in hiking gear, but I know all the women in our snowmobiling group have drop seat riding pants/bibs that make those tasks much easier.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to sdways01 For This Useful Post:

    KathyC (01-23-2012)

  3. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    1,008
    Thanks
    357
    Thanked 171 Times in 116 Posts

    Default

    Thank you for answering, that is good to know.

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Topsfield Ma
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    My buddy asked a fellow, while on Rainer, "what was the hardest part of climbing Everest" to which he replied "trying to pee through six inches of insulation with a three inch unit".

    On the serious side now.

    As for bottoms, I typically wear a pair of Marmot ski pants as my outer layer. I have to say, a pair of full side zip shell pants would be convenient for potty breaks, but more important, I put my boots on at the base after I put on my shell pants. Who would want to take their boots off to put on shell pants when it gets too cold and windy to hike without them? A full side zip pant would make it much quicker and easier. Under the shell I often wear a single mid or heavy weight baselayer. Yesterday I wore both and my wool hiking pants because I expected to be standing still at belays a few times. I could have done fine with the lightweight and wool pants, but luckily my pants breath well and are vented
    My upper body always seems colder than my legs do, until I get moving for ten or so minutes. I typically wear a midweight and a heavyweight baselayer. On top of that I wear a softshell. I bring a micro-puffy jacket for stopping. I also have a waterproof windproof breathable jacket for windy conditions.
    I check the weather before I leave the house and dress for what I think it will be like as far as layers go so I can be quicker at the base. Just the same, I bring a small duffle of other weight stuff and reassess when I get there.


    Yesterday, me and two buddys went up to climb in Huntingtons and ski down from the hut in Tuckermans. I was down to my baselayers, no hat or gloves within ten minutes of the trail head. Granted I was carrying a full ski set-up in addition to climbing gear and regular winter hiking gear, whick was a workout, but if I didn't have my skis we would have been almost twice as fast, and I would have been pretty warm below treeline anyway. Yesterday was a little weird for Washington at the end of January. At the top of the climb on top of Huntingtons completely exposed, it was calm, almost dead calm and probably twenty degrees. I didn't put on my jacket for ten or so minutes while I cooled down.

    Joe.

    Disclaimer: averagejoe works for REI. averagejoe does not speak for REI or represent REI's point of view.
    http://home.comcast.net/~onegearatatime/site/

    "Men hang out signs indicative of their respective trades: shoe makers hang out a gigantic shoe; a jewler a monster watch; and the dentist
    hangs out a gold tooth; but in the Franconia Mountains god almighty has hung out a sign to show that in New England he makes men".
    Daniel Webster 1831

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Sunny FL
    Posts
    239
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 13 Times in 10 Posts

    Default

    ^ what you described above just hit in on the most important advice one can give:

    listen to your body; if you're hot take of a layer or if your shivering put on a layer... everybody's different and you have to figure yourself out and listen to what your body is telling you

    so many people get locked into ideas like "its less than 20 degrees so I need x number of layers" and that just doesn't work



    BTW Joe how was the ice looking in those gullies?
    Last edited by smithtim; 02-13-2012 at 09:26 PM.
    'when it starts to hurt your nearly halfway and probably should get out those ropes & put your crampons on"

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Topsfield Ma
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 1 Post

    Default

    Yeah you know, not as many people hike in the winter because for a newbie it's a P.I.T.A.

    First off there is a whole slew of gear you have to own or some you may be able rent. When you are on the trail and don't have the experience to know how to dress yourself, you can carry extra layers, or wear what you have on and maybe freeze your ass off. Though you're more likely to overdress and sweat. You then think, oh these layers wick so I'm fine, only to get cold when you stop to break cause you're drenched and don't have a layer for that purpose. Not that I ever did that.

    The ice was "good" all things considered. We only went up Central Gully cause there was a slow moving party on Pinnacle. If you have a Facebook account check the pics.

    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?s...3&l=47937abb1a

    Joe.
    http://home.comcast.net/~onegearatatime/site/

    "Men hang out signs indicative of their respective trades: shoe makers hang out a gigantic shoe; a jewler a monster watch; and the dentist
    hangs out a gold tooth; but in the Franconia Mountains god almighty has hung out a sign to show that in New England he makes men".
    Daniel Webster 1831

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •