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Thread: Brad Washburn's Mapping Project for the Presidential Range

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    Default Brad Washburn's Mapping Project for the Presidential Range

    Can someone direct me to an internet reference and/or book reference which provides details about Brad Washburn's mapping project for the NH Presidential Range?
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    Bill
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O View Post
    Thank you Bill for the link to the Google search engine. Before posting my question I had tried that route and only had limited success. Perhaps my search terms were imperfect? I would like to know some details about techniques he used. I thought perhaps the MWO or the AMC might have written something at the time he was doing his mapping, which I think was in the early 1980s?
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    Have you looked into the book: "The Last of His Kind" by David Roberts?

    It is a biography of Brad Washburn. It might have something you are looking for. I have not read it.
    Bill
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O View Post
    Have you looked into the book: "The Last of His Kind" by David Roberts?

    It is a biography of Brad Washburn. It might have something you are looking for. I have not read it.
    I have not taken a look at that particular book. I'll see if my local library has a copy, and if not I'll request a copy through the ILL (IntraLibraryLoan) system. Thank you for taking time to post this!
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    I keep forgetting to post a follow-up to my original posting about this topic. What originally piqued my interest was a small metal rod/pipe that I saw embedded in a rock at the summit of Mt. Jefferson. This is shown in the photo below (please ignore the insect that insisted on being in the photo!)


    Originally, I thought that this metal pipe was the remains of a USGS survey marker, and that the surrounding metal disc had been removed by someone as a souvenir. However, I later learned that this metal pipe was one of many that had been inserted at various locations in the Presidential Range as part of Brad Washburn's mapping project which was conducted during the 1980s.

    During the course of my research I contacted Larry Garland (AMC cartographer) who kindly led me to two references which provide detailed descriptions of Brad Washburn's mapping project for the Presidential Range. These citations are shown below:

    _ Smith, Alan A. Mapping the Mountain: Ten Years of Cartography on Mount Washington, in Appalachia, vol. 48, no. 2 (Boston: Appalachian Mountain Club, December 1990), pp. 18-30.

    _ Smith, Alan A. Mapping the Mountain: Ten Years of Cartography on Mount Washington, Part Two, in Appalachia, vol. 48, no. 3 (Boston: Appalachian Mountain Club, June 1991), pp. 69-80.

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    Shown below is some text excerpted from the December 1990 edition of Appalachia which talks about the metal pipes. Perhaps some readers might find this to be of interest.

    "When we could, we put our triangulation points at existing USGS markers. But when there were none, we put in a new one, or drilled a hole and inserted a short length of pipe, on which targets or prisms could be mounted. Then, at the end of the project, we filled in each of those holes with strong cement the color of the rock, in which was embedded a three-inch stainless steel pin, protruding only half an inch above the surface. Those pins can be used as survey stations in the future."

    ". . . some of the USGS markers we expected to find had been stolen . . . by souvenir hunters. But our pins will be very difficult to extract . . ."

    "For the job, we had a set of rock-drilling bits, a heavy-duty electric drill, and a sixty-five-pound horribly awkward gasoline-powered electric generator, laughingly called "portable." When all that gear could be delivered to the site by car, or by helicopter, drilling a hole was easy. The chips had to be blown out, but then the pipe could be driven home, and a target set in place. Frequently, however, the drilling equipment had to be delivered to some remote location on foot, and for that purpose Brad designed a special pack frame for the generator. The whole load was about seventy-five pounds, a severe test of volunteer enthusiasm! Then, of course, there was the other pack, with the rock drill and the plumbing supplies for handling those pipes, but that was only about sixty pounds!"
    Last edited by 1HappyHiker; 08-10-2012 at 11:09 PM.
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    HH, do you know ( or know of) Brian Fowler? I'm not sure, nor would I be in a position of knowledge, to judge whether Brian's ongoing mapping work is either/ neither contiguous or/nor continuous WRT the Washburn effort, but indeed there is ongoing work mapping MW and the Presidential Range.

    There is an item ISBN # 987-0-9708324-7-4 titled Surficial Geology of Mt Washington and The Presidential Range, New Hampshire 2010, By Brian K Fowler. Publisher Durand Press Lyme NH, www.durandpress.com

    May be of interest to you, maybe not. I'll ask Brian for his business card when I see him next... he is up here quite frequently.

    heck, Brian Fowler may be one amongst us, the one with his headlamp trained on a fundamental piece of glacial evidence.

    Personal messages OK??

    Breeze

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    Breeze, I don't know Brian Fowler personally. However, I do know of his work, and of his book which you referenced.

    And yes, please feel free to send me a private message at any time.

    Thank you for posting your reply!
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