View Poll Results: What Type Are You?

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  • Beginner: Steady slowest pace . 500 - 1,000 feet elevation gain.

    1 8.33%
  • Intermediate: Steady pace. Longer distance .1,000 - 1,500 elevation gain.

    2 16.67%
  • Advanced: Harder, faster pace. Longer distance. 1,500 - 3,000 feet elevation gain.

    4 33.33%
  • Advanced-Plus: Overnight/plus. Steady pace. Longer distance. Elevation varies.

    5 41.67%
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Thread: What Type Of Hiker Are You?

  1. #1
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    Default What Type Of Hiker Are You?

    I'm somewhere in between Intermediate and Advanced. I have a slight handicap from a car accident I had back in 2000. I hurt really bad for a day or two after a climb, so I keep em under 3,000 feet and I only do day hikes.

    Hey.......it's better then not hiking at all.......right?

    How about you? What type of hiker are you?
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  2. #2
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    So anybody who can climb Mount Washington in a day is an advanced-plus? Since its over 3,000 vertical feet to the summit.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    So anybody who can climb Mount Washington in a day is an advanced-plus? Since its over 3,000 vertical feet to the summit.
    That one I had to come up with. I didn't know what to call it!

    The other 3 are from the book.

    I need to get out Bill....this shoulder operation has me down!
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  4. #4
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    I like the advanced-plus rating. The only problem is that includes so many people. I suppose if you are doing 3,000+ feet of gain on multiple days with a pack and long distances that would be a good indicator.

    For a single day with a daypack I'd say 5,000+ feet gets you to advanced-plus.
    Bill
    Next up: Vermont City Marathon: May, 2011
    EasternLight

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    I'm gonna say I'm also between Intermediate and advanced due to the fact that I'm not in the shape I used to be and I don't get too much elevation gain on a regular basis.
    Steve
    Is there really any BAD weather???

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill O
    For a single day with a daypack I'd say 5,000+ feet gets you to advanced-plus.
    So, if 1500-3000 ft. is advanced and 5000+ ft. is advanced-plus, then what is 3000-5000 ft.?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mk10
    So, if 1500-3000 ft. is advanced and 5000+ ft. is advanced-plus, then what is 3000-5000 ft.?
    I knew I'd have trouble with that 4th choice..........

    When I put the poll together, I checked all my books for terms used and levels of hiking. All I could find were 1, 2 and 3 (Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced, with the description of each) I thought there should be a 4th level, so I kinda made up one with the term, Advanced-Plus and the description of what it was. There should be another level, but I couldn't find one.

    So since I'm playing the teacher mk10, haha, I'll give you an Advanced-Plus. Now go to the blackboard and write, "Seek The Peak", 100 times before your dismissed from class!
    Last edited by Joey Keyz; 05-04-2007 at 05:04 AM.
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  8. #8
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    1,000 feet is just a warm-up.
    2,000 and I'm ready for a snack.
    3,000 and I'll wring out the sweat band for the 10th time.
    Now, mind you, no one is talking about how many miles it's taking them to GET that elevation gain. Usually, in my laid-back style, I don't want to commit to more than 6 miles and 4,000 feet of elevation change in one day. Not that I haven't DONE the 11 miles with 5,000 feet - but nowadays I like to experience everything along the way more thoroughly - not the ridge-runner I once was - now it's the quality that counts, not the quantity.
    The really good trips are measured in days, not feet. And the longer, the better. A long weekend, bagging a couple of peaks is great, but nothing beats a 10 day stint in the wilderness. You just come out more relaxed and in tune with the world.

  9. #9
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    The 3,000+ gain is fine with me - 9-12 miles is fine too. The "fast pace" does not cut it.
    Brad (a 6288 club member)
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joey Keyz
    I'm somewhere in between Intermediate and Advanced. I have a slight handicap from a car accident I had back in 2000. I hurt really bad for a day or two after a climb, so I keep em under 3,000 feet and I only do day hikes.

    Hey.......it's better then not hiking at all.......right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Trekker
    1,000 feet is just a warm-up.
    2,000 and I'm ready for a snack.
    3,000 and I'll wring out the sweat band for the 10th time.
    Now, mind you, no one is talking about how many miles it's taking them to GET that elevation gain. Usually, in my laid-back style, I don't want to commit to more than 6 miles and 4,000 feet of elevation change in one day. Not that I haven't DONE the 11 miles with 5,000 feet - but nowadays I like to experience everything along the way more thoroughly - not the ridge-runner I once was - now it's the quality that counts, not the quantity.
    The really good trips are measured in days, not feet. And the longer, the better. A long weekend, bagging a couple of peaks is great, but nothing beats a 10 day stint in the wilderness. You just come out more relaxed and in tune with the world.
    Your a lucky man Trekker. I wish I could do half of that!
    You go for it.........ENJOY!
    "HIKE THE WHITES"

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